Last week, finally, I was able to get through to Defenders of Animal Rights, and I got an appointment to bring Lucky in on Monday for them to enter into their adoption program. There is a $70 surrender donation, which I would be glad to give if I can be assured of her best interests. They said it would be OK if I visited her once in a while at the shelter, to take her for a walk, and for that I would give them additional donations. My fear is that I have heard they will sometimes euthanize dogs that do not appear to be generating interest for adoption. They told me that they would notify me if she displayed dangerous aggression, and would allow me to take her back, but otherwise she would be PTS.
The main reason for my seeking a new home for Lucky has been that she and Muttley were not getting along very well. At first, there were few problems, and I was able to leave them both with free run of the house for a few hours. Then, it seemed that they would play roughly, and it would escalate to what looked like more serious fighting. They would attack each other, with teeth bared, and hackles raised, accompanied by growling, barking, and yelping. They would both grab each others' neck, tail, legs, etc, but did not bite hard enough to cause visible wounds.

More recently, I have noted that it seems like Muttley is trying to limit Lucky's access to me, as if he is jealous of my attention to her. I always have tried to give them equal treatment. Yesterday, I decided to allow their play to continue, rather than always crating one or the other. Once in a while I would tell them to knock it off, and I also tried giving both of them high value treats while they both sat. I even had them share a few pieces of steak on the same plate, and there was also a large bone on the floor, which they took turns chewing on. Sometimes Muttley would grab it out of Lucky's mouth, but it did not seem to cause any severe reaction.

Sometimes it seemed like they were play-fighting to get my attention, as they looked at me and stopped briefly when I called them. But it seemed that Muttley did not want Lucky to go past him to get close to me. When I asked them if they wanted to go out, they both immediately ceased hostilities and waited by the door as I put on their collars and leashes. Most of the time while walking them together, they either ignored each other while they each did their dog things, or else they would walk side by side, almost cheek to cheek. They will pee or poop at the same time, and don't seem to try to cover each other's markings.
But finally, last night, they both seemed to relax a bit more, and they were both lying on the floor near each other when I went up to bed. Previously, I would have crated one or the other, or kept my bedroom door closed with one dog in and the other dog out. Later that night, both dogs came upstairs and slept quietly on the floor. This morning, I was awakened when both dogs got on the bed, but they seemed content to be there with me, rather than interacting with each other.
Eventually, they got more active, and "chewed on" each other, but it seemed more like a grooming behavior; neither dog seemed to be aggressive, and their tails were wagging. They accomplished their objective of getting me out of bed, and taking them for their regular morning walk. When I let them loose in the fenced area, they each just did their own business of peeing and pooping and eating vegetation. They did not run after each other and play-fight, as they usually would, and they were happy to have their leashes back on to continue their walk.
Now Muttley is snoozing on the bed while Lucky is asleep on the floor. It seems like, perhaps, they have now accepted each other. When they are so well behaved like this, I get second thoughts about surrendering her to adoption. I'm sure she will be happier here if I don't need to keep her in a crate for extended times. It is difficult managing two dogs, but really not that bad as long as they are not (literally) at each others' throats. Maybe they have finally worked out some dominance issues, and I wonder now if they will actually miss each other if I separate them.

I know I will miss Lucky if I surrender her to DoAR, but I want to do what is best for her, as well as me. I'd feel a lot better if I found a home for her with someone I knew, or at least nearby, so I could see that she is happy and being well cared for. At the shelter, she would probably be isolated in a fenced run, and I know she gets anxious and barks and whines when I leave her for a while. She seems to enjoy being close to people. So, based on these recent experiences, my decision has become more difficult. What do you think?
Paul, Muttley and Lucky
More recently, I have noted that it seems like Muttley is trying to limit Lucky's access to me, as if he is jealous of my attention to her. I always have tried to give them equal treatment.

You are the "resource" and the source of food and all good things. Muttley isn't capable of reasoning his way to the appropriate conclusion - which is that there will always be enough food, etc. She may be a playmate for him some of the time, but other times, she's competition.
I even had them share a few pieces of steak on the same plate, and there was also a large ... on. Sometimes Muttley would grab it out of Lucky's mouth, but it did not seem to cause any severe reaction.

This wasn't a good idea. You set them up to have a horrendous fight over that bone, and Muttley knows now that it's acceptable to take things from Lucky.
You were warned, and warned, and warned in here about stuff like this.
Now Muttley is snoozing on the bed while Lucky is asleep on the floor. It seems like, perhaps, they have now accepted each other.

They may have worked things out, but there's no telling for sure, especially at a distance through usenet.
When living in a multiple dog household, IMO it is best to always feed separately, don't give ONE high-value treat - like the bone on the floor - and all those other things you were told again, and again, and again.
What do you think?

I think what you need to realize about doing one-man rescue is that it isn't always possible to find a home for all the dogs that can be pulled off the street. Therefore, this choice will come up again in future: Do you keep the dog yourself for an unspecified length of time, perhaps for life? Or surrender it to be possibly PTS?
flick 100785

I respect your advice, and that of others, who may have warned me about such things being an issue. However, I was watching their interactions carefully, and they did not seem to get snarky about the bone. It's an old one, anyway, so it's not a very high value item. I have read in "How to Talk to Your Animals", by Jean Craighead George, that "food belongs to the one that claims it first, no matter what its status". I saw that in action several times, where Muttley lay next to Lucky while she chewed on the bone, but when she dropped it, he snagged it, and it was his turn. Maybe rules are different when the dog is carrying it? Anyway, it did not create a problem, and in fact may have desensitized them to resource guarding.
Now Muttley is snoozing on the bed while Lucky is asleep on the floor. It seems like, perhaps, they have now accepted each other.

They may have worked things out, but there's no telling for sure, especially at a distance through usenet. When living ... like the bone on the floor - and all those other things you were told again, and again, and again.

When I give high value treats, I have them sit and take them separately. They are getting better about waiting their equal turns. I have separate food dishes, but I fill them both, and they take turns eating from either one. There is one water dish, which does not seem to be a problem.
What do you think?

I think what you need to realize about doing one-man rescue is that it isn't always possible to find a ... keep the dog yourself for an unspecified length of time, perhaps for life? Or surrender it to be possibly PTS?

I don't intend to get involved again in a rescue, at least not one started by Helene. But there is always the chance that a stray dog or cat could show up somewhere, and I might need to accept the consequences of taking action, or doing nothing. For now, if Lucky and Muttley continue to get along (they are now both lying quietly on the bed), I think I will keep her, but continue to seek possible direct rehoming. I think she has a better life as it is, than being confined in a run at a shelter.

Thanks,
Paul, Muttley and Lucky
You know this just infuriates me. You take the dog in take care of it then when things get a bit rough you dump her off. Typical behavior of someone who doesn't know what the hell they are doing. Everyone had told you time and time again what you need to do but you don't listen. It's like talking to a brick wall.
You are the SUPPOSED to be the leader here..take the time and make it so. You control the food, treats & play time. Work at it before dumping the dog off on someone else. If the dogs were truely fighting there would be blood it sounds more like rough and tumble play to me and it just needs mediated much better.
NOW THIS BEHAVIOR IS JUST ASKING FOR A FIGHT TO BREAK OUT..I even had them share a few pieces of steak on the same plate..keep this up and you are going to have a bloody fight.
I don't even feed my dogs close to each other they deserve peace and quiet while eating. The two older ones eat on opposite ends of the kitchen and the pup eats in her kennel and if any of them approachs the others bowl while eating they get yelled at to back off. They know not to bother each other and it's because I've spent the time teaching them it's not acceptable.
Celeste
I don't intend to get involved again in a rescue, at least not one started by Helene. But there is ... or cat could show up somewhere, and I might need to accept the consequences of taking action, or doing nothing.

I suggest for you to do nothing next time, regardless of who instigated the "rescue". Next time leave it to those who make it their business, either non-profit or animal control.
For now, if Lucky and Muttley continue to get along (they are now both lying quietly on the bed), I ... a better life as it is, than being confined in a run at a shelter. Thanks, Paul, Muttley and Lucky

Then I think you are even more of a fool. You don't want a second dog, you have said it yourself over and over again. You do stupid things all the time with two dogs that could result in a horrible incident. Steak on ONE plate? How daft do you have to be. You finally got a place for her with people that know what they are doing(presumably), don't pass up this opportunity because it may not come again if you do have an incident.
Nick
This wasn't a good idea. You set them up to ... and warned, and warned in here about stuff like this.

I respect your advice, and that of others, who may have warned me about such things being an issue. However, ... is carrying it? Anyway, it did not create a problem, and in fact may have desensitized them to resource guarding.

There is one thing you are very, very good at, and that is rationalizing just about anything you do. Why do you bother to ask for advice?
You have two large dogs, each of whom is capable of doing significant damage to the other, and you aren't very good at reading their body language. You should be doing everything possible to minimize the likelihood of a confrontation, not deliberately (or stupidly) setting the stage for one and then waiting to see what happens.
When I give high value treats, I have them sit and take them separately. They are getting better about waiting ... they take turns eating from either one. There is one water dish, which does not seem to be a problem.

My dogs have always been fed separately, with dishes on opposite sides of the room. And the rule is, if one finishes first, the others are to be left to eat in peace. No swapping, no taking turns, no pushing aside. (Someday you might have to give one a special diet. That is not the time to decide to change the rules. Enforce the rules now.)
FurPaw

"Every gun that is made, every warship launched,
every rocket fired, signifies in the final sense
a theft from those who hunger and are not fed,
those who are cold and are not clothed."
- Dwight D. Eisenhower
To reply, unleash the dog.