A show of hands will do.
Who wants to give people like Todd Stosuy (and other members of the "reality-based" community) the power to determine what constitutes a responsible breeder?
http://www.insidebayarea.com/ci 6218465?source=rss

Handsome Jack Morrison
Prouder than ever to not be a member of the "reality-based" community.
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A show of hands will do. Who wants to give people like Todd Stosuy (and other members of the "reality-based" community) the power to determine what constitutes a responsible breeder? 6218465?source=rss Handsome Jack Morrison

This is some seriously scary stuff. There is proposed legislation in DC that is very similar in wording.
I've been encouraging friends and family in CA to contact their reps and let them know that they are opposed.
Beth
I've been encouraging friends and family in CA to contact their reps and let them know that they are opposed.

I'd really like to know if anybody's got some workable ideas about what to do about the rather serious pet overpopulation problem. It's pretty much out of control and it's turning into a public policy problem (cf. "negative externality").
Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

Prouder than ever to be a member of the reality-based community
A show of hands will do. Who wants to give ... a responsible breeder? 6218465?source=rss Handsome Jack Morrison

This is some seriously scary stuff. There is proposed legislation in DC that is very similar in wording. I've been encouraging friends and family in CA to contact their reps and let them know that they are opposed. Beth

From what I have read about this law, it does seem like a serious and arbitrary attack on individual freedom. Yes, most pets should be spayed or neutered, but it should be my decision, not the government's. However, I think it would be acceptable to promote responsible pet ownership by increasing the cost of licensing an intact animal by the approximate cost of a spay/neuter. There are reasons to keep an animal intact, other than breeding, and that should be recognized, and allowed for any responsible individual. The additional revenue can be used to provide low cost vet care and education.
Paul and Muttley
The additional revenue can be used to provide low cost vet care and education.

Or maybe the additional revenue can be used to pay for the costs of cleaning up the mess caused by pet overpopulation. Right now that's being paid for by taxpayers and insurance premiums. Or maybe you're one of the putzes who thinks that pet overpopulation doesn't affect anybody but the breeders and the animals?
I pay more to register intact animals - $5 more per dog. Woohoo! If it were to go up enough to cover the costs incurred by slovenly pet owner behavior you'd see the same kind of "You're not the boss of me!" crap you're seeing right now in response to the California proposal and you'd see more people not bothering to register their intact dogs.

Smart but libertoonian Tyler Cowan has said that Americans should be required to show basic economic literacy before being allowed to vote. I disagree - I think there's a basic right to vote and his proposal is basically fascist. Still, it's pretty depressing that people don't have better tools at their disposal for helping them frame and evaluate policy problems.
So, what *do* you do when a large bunch of people refuse to take responsibility for their actions and they displace the costs of their irresponsibility onto the broader population?
Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

Prouder than ever to be a member of the reality-based community
I'd really like to know if anybody's got some workable ideas about what to do about the rather serious pet overpopulation problem. It's pretty much out of control and it's turning into a public policy problem (cf. "negative externality").

Good question. It's so easy to shoot down ideas. I think the proposed legislation is bad too. That makes me all the more interested if there's legislation that would work better.
Perhaps it would be good to study what's being done in my part of New England. It's practically impossible to adopt a puppy here. There's not much selection of older dogs in the shelters either. I've known people to drive to shelters in Georgia to get a mutt. Shelters import dogs from the Carolinas and Puerto Rico. This is all good news.
I'd love to see the puppy mills shut down, but the legislation would have to be awfully precise to separate the puppy millers from the responsible breeders, and I don't think anyone wants law makers who don't know anything much about dogs writing the legislation.
Lia
LbnZ2dnUVZ (Email Removed):
Perhaps it would be good to study what's being done in my part of New England. It's practically impossible to adopt a puppy here.

Yes we're one of the areas imported from. I was shocked, in a pleased sort of way, to learn that. IIRC, it had to do with the shelters doing the neutering before an animal could be adopted? Rather than adopting out with a spay/neuter contract, as we do here.

Catherine
& Zoe the cockerchow
& Queenie the black gold retriever
& Max the pomeranian
& Rosalie the calico cat
Yes we're one of the areas imported from. I was shocked, in a pleased sort of way, to learn ... the neutering before an animal could be adopted? Rather than adopting out with a spay/neuter contract, as we do here.

It must be a combination of things money to do the neutering at the shelter, money to adopt out fairly healthy dogs with heartworm treatment and vax, money to pick up strays immediately (you almost never see a dog unattended), money for education, etc. I'm not even sure where the money comes from. Cubbe's $80 adoption fee seemed high to us coming, as we did, from Florida, but the money can't all be in adoption fees. There aren't that many dogs to adopt! Her yearly tag only costs $15. I'm not sure where the money is coming from, or if it has to do with money at all. But someone's doing something right.
Lia
Perhaps it would be good to study what's being done in my part of New England. It's practically impossible to adopt a puppy here.

Yes we're one of the areas imported from. I was shocked, in a pleased sort of way, to learn ... the neutering before an animal could be adopted? Rather than adopting out with a spay/neuter contract, as we do here.

That's the case in CA as well. The dogs have to be spayed/neutered before adoption. It has cut down the number of dogs in shelters, but not enough, unfortunately.
Paula
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