Okay bug experts..big fat June bugs just appeared dive-bombing my porch light. I caught a couple and gave them to the savannah. He chomped them right down, so apparently they taste good. Are they okay for lizard food?

Cindy
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Okay bug experts..big fat June bugs just appeared dive-bombing my porch light. I caught a couple and gave them to the savannah. He chomped them right down, so apparently they taste good. Are they okay for lizard food? Cindy

Oops, posted under husband's ID.
Cindy
GR << branded this on the
forehead of the ether on 04/09/2004 09:37 PM:
Okay bug experts....big fat June bugs just appeared dive-bombing my porch light. I caught a couple and gave them to the savannah. He chomped them right down, so apparently they taste good. Are they okay for lizard food?

==

Shouldn't be anything wrong with the bug itself, but the usual disclaimer is "how can you be sure it hasn't been exposed to pesticides??". In a more flippant mood, I would answer "because its still flying", but that's just me. There are several common 'crop pest' insects that have evolved into 'super-bug' status by developing a resistance to pesticides, and those could conceivably carry a significant load of contamination without showing ill effects.... Tobacco budworm comes to mind. Anyway, the bug is probably fine, but you don't know where its been.
DC
Shouldn't be anything wrong with the bug itself, but the usual disclaimer is "how can you be sure it hasn't ... effects.. Tobacco budworm comes to mind. Anyway, the bug is probably fine, but you don't know where its been. DC

Thank you! Is it safe to assume that if the lizard will eat the bug, the bug itself is not poisonous to the lizard? Or are they smart enough to know what's bad for them?
Cindy
Thank you! Is it safe to assume that if the lizard will eat thebug, the bug itself is not poisonous to the lizard? Or are they smart enoughto know what's bad for them?

Doubtful. A lizard will eat a firefly if given the chance, and those kill lizards. Feeding responses are based on bug-like motion. Logically, any residual hereditary knowledge the lizard might have of toxic feeder insects would be based on those found in the Savannah's indigeous territory.
fr0glet
There are several common 'crop pest' insects that have evolved ... carry a significant load of contamination without showing ill effects..

A recent study found that approximately 80% of all common bugs can now be classified as "super-bugs" ...those who contain a large amount of pesticide residue(s) due to resistance. June Bugs are one of them.
Thank you! Is it safe to assume that if the lizard will eat the bug, the bug itself is not poisonous to the lizard?

Wrong!
June Bugs are very resistant to pesticides...upwards to concentrations of 10% Sevin Dust, and 15% Dursban, Diazinon, Malathion. At one time, concentrations as little as 3% of ANY of these would wipe out June Bugs. In a nut shell, a June Bug is near the top-tier as far as pesticide residues and resistance goes.
First the most obvious:
A Savannah monitor is not native to the US, therefore it would have no way of determining what is a viable food source for its survival; nor what is "safe" to eat. It isn't the insect per se, it is the movement that attracts the monitor.
Second:
Can YOU tell a pesticide resistant strain of insect by looking at it?

Although many animals do learn what is and isn't safe food items, certain variables such as pesticide build-ups are NOT something that can be determined by an animals sense of smell or taste. It is true that a Savannah monitor has a strong constitution, but not when it comes to pesticides.

Then there are those insects, even if they aren't a walking chemical lab, that are just poisonous to (in your case) lizards. Firefly's come to mind, as are many other species of beetles.
~Wade
I don't think it's time for actual "June Bugs" to show up yet. And they are not usually found at night. Just some type of night beetle? A June Bug is green, looking like an oversized Japanese Beetle.

Roger
(Email Removed) (Roger Helms) rambled on about:
I don't think it's time for actual "June Bugs" to show up yet. And they are not usually found at night. Just some type of night beetle? A June Bug is green, looking like an oversized Japanese Beetle. Roger

I think I know what bug Cindy is talking about. I think its the brown ones that come out at night, buzz your porch lights, and get everywhere. The brown ones are actually Masked chafers, /Cyclocephala sp./. I found this link:
http://insects.tamu.edu/fieldguide/bimg140.html
griffin
griffin branded this on the
forehead of the ether on 04/10/2004 01:08 PM:
I don't think it's time for actual "June Bugs" to ... Bug is green, looking like an oversized Japanese Beetle. Roger

I think I know what bug Cindy is talking about. I think its the brown ones that come out at night, buzz your porch lights, and get everywhere. The brown ones are actually Masked chafers, /Cyclocephala sp./. I found this link: http://insects.tamu.edu/fieldguide/bimg140.html griffin

==
The brown ones are what we always called "June bugs" back in Texas. Here in the Mid-Atlantic states, they have the green ones like Roger describes. We did frequently see a green beetle in Texas that looked very similar, but it was actually a Calosoma beetle, a very GOOD beneficial insect to have around the place, much too valuable to use as a feeder, as the adults and larvae are aggressive predators on caterpillars. Here in SW VA, we have scads of 'wild' Trichogramma wasps that do a hell of a job for us too.
DC
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