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I have run into a lot of folks who say the same, but I also let them know that with proper work these birds work through that stage. I have 6 Senegals out here right now, one baby of two years old, a few breeders and two old folks who fit that group you speak of. Today they are sweet attentive and properly worked are good companions. I have also rehomed 8 or
9 from a former breeder friend of mine who passed away several years ago, Italk to these folks a lot and they are happy with the re-trained beast from the black lagoon. Just takes a differnt style to work with them at their level. :0)
Bob W

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My wife wants a parrot that will accept the entire ... Me, my wife, and 2 girls 14 and 17. Thanks.

From our limited experience with different species, first choice would definitely be a Caique. They're good natured, love to play, ... more to one person. The other two did not. Species to stay away from in this regard: Cockatoos and Senegals.

You obviously know nothing of Senegals. They are the most even tempered friendly birds that I own. Noise is also a non-issue.

ZQ
Really, wondering what basis you exclude the Senegals?

Well, I prefaced the comments with a disclaimer that our experience is limited. We've had only two Senegals and both ... to be with us (or any other humans). From what we've read it's a common occurrence with this particular species.

I hadn't heard that about senegals (or paid attention to it) until recently. My senegals passed that stage without me even knowing that there was supposed to be a problem.
ZQ
One-person birds are made, not born/bred. If everyone takes an ... person in the family/flock. Mark Chandler Superior, CO http://www.MileHighSkates.com

This has been my experience. I have seen and handled all kinds of birds in pet shops, both young and older birds. When they are well tamed and regularly see different people they do fine with anyone who will pay attention to them.

Because they have no time to bond in the few minutes that anyone pays attentiont to them.
It's after they are given a permanent home, that they learn to be a one person bird.

Gee, you really think that after they live somewhere with a limited number of people that they have time to develop a bond?
You are so intellectual. Your experience show that a bird only bonds with people when it is given the time to do so - pure genius.

ZQ
How about an Umbrella Cockatoo, see the post I put in called "Umbrella Cockatoo for sale"
How about an Umbrella Cockatoo, see the post I put in called "Umbrella Cockatoo for sale"[/nq]These "generally" are a VERY poor choice for new bird owners. There is a reason so many are always for sale. This does not mean they can't be a great pet, I have seen several who were, but they take the "right owners". When I was looking for my Macaw we saw them at every shop that sold large birds. I remember one that stood out was on a stand at a shop.

We both were handling it, it was very friendly. A guy came over and picked her up, and was playing with her, he mentioned she was his. I said I thought she was for sale, he said no he knew the people who owned the shop, and just brought her down there to interact with other birds, and people. Sure seemed to work as the bird was very friendly to us.
Another was owned by a guy who ran a Construction sales business. He had one he kept at work. I saw him walking around with it started talking to him. He let us both handle the bird, she also was very friendly. The owner said she spent a lot of time with him in his office so she was always around "people". He said with one exception she always took to people. The problem with these birds though can be NOISE, and lot's of it. Many people just can't deal with it, and do not know how to handle it, and the birds get passed from one home to another. Of course all birds are individuals, and all are not the same, but I would not recommend a Too as a bird for someone "new to birds".

If at first you don't succeed blame someone else and seek counseling.
Actually it all depends on the bird, they have their likes and dislikes in all breeds. When picking the bird you should take the whole family and allow then all to interact with it and see which one will work out for everyone including the bird.
Actually it all depends on the bird, they have their likes and dislikes in all breeds. When picking the bird ... and allow then all to interact with it and see which one will work out for everyone including the bird.

First impressions are a good sign, but the likes and dislikes of both birds and family members can change with time. A spouse can agree to having birds to please their mate, and that can lead to disaster later.
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