My wife wants a parrot that will accept the entire family and not bond to one person.
Any ideas? The family is Me, my wife, and 2 girls 14 and 17.

Thanks.
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My wife wants a parrot that will accept the entire family and not bond to one person. Any ideas? The family is Me, my wife, and 2 girls 14 and 17. Thanks.

From our limited experience with different species, first choice would definitely be a Caique. They're good natured, love to play, and (at least judging from the three we've had) do not bond to one person over another.
Second choice would be a Green Cheek Conure. We've also had three of these, and only one of them bonded more to one person. The other two did not.
Species to stay away from in this regard: Cockatoos and Senegals.
I think I'd endorse a conure as a family bird. We rescued a little neglected sun conure last March, and he's equally happy with either me or my husband. In fact, he seems to welcome just about any visitor giving him attention/affection.
Another bird to steer clear of... African Greys. I adore our Grey, but it's taken a lot of work, patience and a ton of band-aids to encourage him to be a two person bird (he fell in love with my hubby). Now he's loves us both, he'll go to my husband first for love, and come to me first for reassurance/protection.
Also, I'd be careful of Amazons. Our yellow-nape is a pleasure, but I work with her just about every day (for nearly 4 years) to keep her that way. However, she's only a pleasure to me and my husband. She's overbonded to us, and now does not care for strangers (okay, she tries to bite them to see their reaction then she laughs). She's a lot of fun, hysterical to watch, and the best cuddle-bird on the planet... but only with me and my hubby.
Just my input...
Amy
I agree with Amy, a Conure is a great family bird. Do you have any experience with parrots in general?
My wife wants a parrot that will accept the entire family and not bond to one person. Any ideas? The family is Me, my wife, and 2 girls 14 and 17. Thanks.

One-person birds are made, not born/bred. If everyone takes an active role in handling the bird, it will not (overly) bond to one person in the family/flock.

Mark Chandler
Superior, CO
http://www.MileHighSkates.com
I agree with Amy, a Conure is a great family bird. Do you have any experience with parrots in general?

Don't forget Pionus.
Really, wondering what basis you exclude the Senegals?

Bob Wheeler

Check out our web site,
A few new features and new pictures.
http://www.onemorebird.com /
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Really, wondering what basis you exclude the Senegals?

Well, I prefaced the comments with a disclaimer that our experience is limited. We've had only two Senegals and both underwent a personality change at around four years of age. While they didn't become completely anti-social, they lost most of their desire to be with us (or any other humans).

From what we've read it's a common occurrence with this particular species.
My wife wants a parrot that will accept the entire ... Me, my wife, and 2 girls 14 and 17. Thanks.

One-person birds are made, not born/bred. If everyone takes an active role in handling the bird, it will not (overly) bond to one person in the family/flock. Mark Chandler Superior, CO http://www.MileHighSkates.com

This has been my experience. I have seen and handled all kinds of birds in pet shops, both young and older birds. When they are well tamed and regularly see different people they do fine with anyone who will pay attention to them. It's after they are given a permanent home, that they learn to be a one person bird.
First make sure you want a Parrot, too many people buy one, then decide it's not for them. After you are sure you really want to make the commitment, all of you should go shopping. If you can all handle the bird at the store or breeders, and you all pay attention to the bird at home, then the bird should remain a family pet. Birds have very good memories. Our Blue Crown Conure always liked our Daughter. She long ago moved out, but any time she comes by for a visit now he always wants to sit on her.
If at first you don't succeed blame someone else and seek counseling.
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