We just had to put our oldest family dog down. She was 18 years old, but her long life was finally in constant pain.
Our problem is our other dog: a 7-year old Huskie, who has grown up with, and never been without, the older dog. The Huskie is now using the bathroom, both #1 and #2, in the house, when we are home. Rather than come get us, as she used to do, she goes to another room (not very far from us, though) and let's loose.
Are there any books or publications that address the bereavement behavior of the remaining dogs?
Or does anyone have any experience or advice to offer? Thanx,
Bill
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"riversnew" (Email Removed) whittled the following words:
We just had to put our oldest family dog down. She was 18 years old, but her long life was ... address the bereavement behavior of the remaining dogs? Or does anyone have any experience or advice to offer? Thanx, Bill

I'm so very sorry for your loss. I know my 4 year old is just now getting over the loss of the Matriarch from a year ago. I'm not sure how to address this, but my best guess is to get her another companion.
We just had to put our oldest family dog down. She was 18 years old, but her long life was finally in constant pain.

I'm sorry. But it sounds like you made a good decision and did the right thing by her.
Our problem is our other dog: a 7-year old Huskie, who has grown up with, and never been without, the ... us, as she used to do, she goes to another room (not very far from us, though) and let's loose.

Did your Huskie ever have her own signals, or was she following the lead of your older girl? At this stage, I'd put her on a schedule - taking her out when you think she needs to go and praising her when she does.

Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
It could be a signal issue but I would also take her to the vet for a checkup to be sure nothing else is going on.
Celeste
She has always had her own signals. The older dog was the one that had to be on a schedule and Mysti (the huskie) always let us know what she needed, when she needed it. We're still on the same typical seudo schedule; that is, she is let out after meals, after sleeping, after we come in from a run, etc. That hasn't changed. It's just that now, instead of coming to get us in between those times, she just does it..
She has always had her own signals. The older dog was the one that had to be on a schedule ... hasn't changed. It's just that now, instead of coming to get us in between those times, she just does it..

Don't let her wander off until she gets through it. Whether it is caused by grief or something else (and I would agree with others that a vet check is in order), the more she goes in the other room, the harder it will be to break her of the habit. If she is always with you, she will either tell you she needs to go or you will see her looking for a spot and you can interrupt that and take her out. I like to tether dogs that aren't reliable to me with a leash around my waist or tied to my belt loop. I have both hands free but the dog can't get into any trouble.

Paula
"Anyway, other people are weird, but sometimes they have candy, so it's best to try to get along with them." Joe Bay
We just had to put our oldest family dog down. She was 18 years old, but her long life was finally in constant pain.

I'm sorry. And how fortunate you were to have her for so long!
Our problem is our other dog: a 7-year old Huskie, who has grown up with, and never been without, the ... address the bereavement behavior of the remaining dogs? Or does anyone have any experience or advice to offer? Thanx, Bill

I second Paula's tethering suggestion.
FurPaw

To reply, unleash the dog
My condelences on your loss.

Debbie the Dogged das at spamcop dot net
"Poodles are space aliens who think they've disguised themselves as dogs." - Paghat the Ratgirl