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I would imagine this depends greatly on the shelter, its organization and the staff.

Yeah, but Lynn was referring to the specific shelter where this happened. She said she's familiar with the layout of this specific shelter.

Cate
I find it very hard to believe that they didn't see their dog at the shelter when they supposedly came looking for the dog on THREE occasions. If they only went once, perhaps they missed her while she was being treated for cuts (even though shelter officials state that people in search of lost pets are taken into the hospital too), but they went 3 times and didn't see her? Sounds like crap to me.
I also think it's a bull crap story that they were worried about the dog choking a on a collar so they didn't put it on her. If true, they could've bought a break-away collar, microchipped or tattooed the dog. There is absolutely NO reason for a dog to be outside with out identification.

I feel bad for them, but it's their own fault that they and Bella (and Zina who's still lost) are in this situation.

Kristen and
Kali CDX, CGC, TDIA, TT
www.kristenandkali.com
I do wonder about the idea of someone at the shelter wanting the dog. That would explain the hardcore attitude ... the best thing for the dog, too, since how could a dog loose without a collar be well cared for?

There's another factor in all this that I've not yet seen commented on (though I haven't read all the way down the thread yet): the dog was intact; when the rightful owner finally located her, she was "in a pen waiting to be spayed".
I have a strong suspicion that somebody at the shelter deemed the dog's owner irresponsible because the dog wasn't spayed.
I also think it's a bull crap story that they were worried about the dog choking a on a collar so they didn't put it on her.

Why is it so unbelievable? I have the exact same concerns about my dog because of a previous incident, which is why he doesn't wear a collar inside. He also doesn't wear a collar outside while on momentary pee breaks. I don't leave Orson out back unattended, but I do often let him out, turn around to stir my pot or fix a drink or whatever, and let him back in 1 minute later.
If true, they
could've bought a break-away collar, microchipped or tattooed the dog. There is absolutely NO reason for a dog to be outside with out identification.

I hope you're not saying that because this owner let them in a fenced yard out without collars that she deserves to lose them.

Cate
The problem with a lawsuit is that the costs of defense will come out of the shelter's budget (I assume). Win or lose, the ones that really get hurt by a lawsuit are the animals (less money availble to care for them).

And bad publicity also hurts the animals. How many people are NOT going to donate to this shelter or be particularly eager to be associated with them as a result of this?
We have a local fund drive that involves area restaurants donating a share of profits from certain days in the year to the local shelter. You can bet that if I owned a restaurant that I wouldn't be too eager to get involved with a shelter like that. I would probably avoid patronizing business that supported the shelter.
The answer was to straighten it out right at the start. The shelter should have admitted to mistakes - even if they don't totally agree that they made them. Announce some policy changes as a result of this. Larger signs directing people of their policies and protocols.
And since they still had physical possession of the dog, it should have been returned to the original owner. Make her pay fees so there's no net loss of income for the shelter. Give the other people another dog and don't charge them if that's what it takes. They had no connection to this dog.

Even if the signed papers indicated that the dog belonged to the new owners and was just being held at the shelter to be spayed or whatever, you can bet that they would have been demanding their money back if the dog died on the operating table. If that happens while my dog is at the vet, no one gives me any money back.
~~Judy
anything beyond the standard shake, play dead, and so on.

i stole one of Melanie's ideas: "what's in the boox?" that's harriet's cue to go look in the toybox (like i need to encourage her to dig out all her toys). i inadvertently taught her to commando crawl ("sneaky-sneaky") and to woo-woo on command (tell me your troubles). she also gives a quick, boinky nose kiss when you make a smacky kissing noise. dunno if it qualifies as a trick, but when you tell her to get "snuggly" she curls up and puts her head in your lap (handy for when you want to tuck her in at night).
elliott's a little slow in the trick department. he stands on his tippy toes when you tell him to "grow for it" and walks backward when you tell him to "reverse."

shelly (perfectly foul wench) and elliott and harriet http://home.bluemarble.net/~scouvrette
dunno if it qualifies as a trick, but when you tell her to get "snuggly" she curls up and puts her head in your lap (handy for when you want to tuck her in at night).

I think anything that you can get the dog to do on command that's out of the ordinary can help demonstrate ownership.
Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

In fiscal 2003, personal bankruptcies grew by 7.8%. Corporate bankruptcies fell 7.4%.
I have a strong suspicion that somebody at the shelter deemed the dog's owner irresponsible because the dog wasn't spayed.

Can you imagine having a dog with a show career or one that's a great breeding candidate escape, be spayed, and then adopted out to someone else? Yeesh.

Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

In fiscal 2003, personal bankruptcies grew by 7.8%. Corporate bankruptcies fell 7.4%.
I have a strong suspicion that somebody at the shelter deemed the dog's owner irresponsible because the dog wasn't spayed.

Then that to me is a problem. Yes spaying/neutering is good but when a dogs owner is deemed irresponsible for such then IMO the whole s/n thing has gone too far. JMO and I am sticking to it.
Gwen
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