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Sounds like this may be more a case of the shelter not wanting to give a refund or have a refund showing on their books *or* someone at the shelter really wanted that dog so he/she gets preference over the former owner.

The latter possibility makes me feel sick to my stomach, that someone could earmark my dog for themselves or their friends, and adopt him out after hiding him from me.
Cate
Unless your dog is lost in Austin, Houston, Dallas/Fort Worth, San Antonio and possibly Corpus Christy I wouldn't expect the itty bitty towns to have a clue that microchips even exist. Sad but true.

unlike a tag, a chip is fairly permanent. if you *do* find the dog, you can prove it's yours. no, it's not perfect, but nothing is. doing nothing, because nothing is perfect, is not acceptable to me.

shelly (perfectly foul wench) and elliott and harriet http://home.bluemarble.net/~scouvrette
Unless your dog is lost in Austin, Houston, Dallas/Fort Worth, ... have a clue that microchips even exist. Sad but true.

unlike a tag, a chip is fairly permanent. if you *do* find the dog, you can prove it's yours. no, ... nothing, because nothing is perfect, is not acceptable to me. shelly (perfectly foul wench) and elliott and harriet http://home.bluemarble.net/~scouvrette

I definitely agree. Which is why Reznor is gonna get chipped Feb. 14.
Gwen
good! considering the good arguments against keeping collars on unattended dogs,

Perhaps this is a stupid question, but why are you not suppose to keep a collar on unattended dogs? David

I do. But there is a chance/possibility that your dog could choke to death in a case in which the collar got hung. One thing that recently went around was two dog households in which one of the dogs while playing gets their teeth/mouth hung in other dogs collar. The other dogs chokes to death because the owner can not get the collar off in time.
Gwen
Sounds like this may be more a case of the shelter not wanting to give a refund or have a refund showing on their books

which would be a ludicrous excuse IMO.

Sounds ludicrous but isn't that farfetched really. Shelters who exist on county funding, particularly in a county that doesn't devote much money to the shelter, often face cutbacks depending on their quarterly reports. I know of shelters who lose a portion of their funding each year if their "return" rate exceeds a certain number per quarter. I think they are allowed 5 returns every 3 months, anything over that looks bad. Some lose funding based on how many euthanizations they did, the rationale supposedly being that the shelter isn't make a strong enough effort to place the animals. Most shelters have to fight, tooth & nail, for every little bit of funding they get and unfortunately numbers on their books can negatively impact them.
*or* someone at the shelter really wanted that dog so he/she gets preference over the former owner.

which would be very* unethical IMO, but it sounds like the most logical explanation to me. it just seems to ... occasions. if the owner is telling the truth, then the dog had to have been kept away from public view.
I don't know if you remember but I recounted a story once or twice of when Pebbles the Min. Dach. and Katie the GSP, dug out of my backyard (while I was home) and were picked up in front of my *neighbor's house almost immediately..had to be because I noticed them missing fairly quickly. Umpteen calls to AC and the shelter left me clueless. Supposedly no one had seen my dogs. At the time I didn't know they'd been picked up by AC so we searched well into the night for them and this happened in the morning.

It got so bad that we were searching the roadside drainage ditches. More calls the next day also proved fruitless. Finally I went up to the shelter just to be certain and there were my two dogs except that the girl upfront didn't even know they were there. My description of them & their breed names didn't ring any bells for her so I insisted to go back and see for myself. They were in general population, the shelter here has the immediately adoptable dogs on the right side & the stray-hold dogs on the left but all are open to public viewing.

Turns out AC forgot to log my dogs and the shelter hadn't recorded the previous day's incoming yet. Back then it was only a 3 day hold and this was day 2. I could have easily lost my dogs if I'd kept taking other people's word that they weren't there. You'd think* that of the 2 departments solely responsible for taking in dogs that *one of them would have had a freakin clue.
That helps but certainly isn't fullproof. Alot of shelters have scanners but don't use them.

i realize that, but in a case like this, they'd have a hell of a time rationalizing why a chipped pet was placed with a new owner instead of being returned to it's original owner.

Yes, it certainly would have been insurance for the owner.

Tara
I agree. This part of the story sounds very fishy. Even if the dog was temporarily removed from the facility at ... 'Oh, and we also have this other GR that might be yours. Come back at 3pm when she'll be back.'

yep.
It seems to me that the prospective adopter's rights should be negated if the shelter is acting against its published policies or against municipal code to have strays on display. I'd hope so, anyway.

i would hope so, but i wouldn't want to assume anything. i can see how protecting the adopter's rights, regardless of whether or not the shelter was acting appropriately, could invalidate the original owner's claim to the dog. yucky, but i can see how it could happen.
I'd consider suing in this case. I hope the original owner does, if nothing else but to get some answers from the shelter about where her dog was during the times she visited but didn't see her.

oh yeah. i'm not sue-happy, but if something like that happened to me, i'd definitely take whatever legal action i could. if nothing else, i'd want to stop the same thing from happening to anyone else.

shelly (perfectly foul wench) and elliott and harriet http://home.bluemarble.net/~scouvrette
only a 3 day hold and this was day 2. I could have easily lost my dogs if I'd kept ... of the 2 departments solely responsible for taking in dogs that one of them would have had a freakin clue.

Around here, if you call in asking about whether they've found a lost dog, they'll tell you to come down and look for yourself. And you have to ask them to see the ones in quarantine, being vetted, etc. Turns out they've had way too many cases of people giving descriptions (big, black dog turns out to be a medium sized dark brown dog, for example) that don't fit the dogs, and then got all upset that the shelter wasn't able to ID their dog.
Suja
Well-meaning people working in rescue and shelters sometimes like to think they know what the dog's life was like, based on how the dog presents itself. If the dog is thin, he obviously wasn't loved and/or was dumped. If the dog has wounds, he obviously was abused.
A couple of months ago, I got a call on my cell {grr!} from someone who had found a pit bull four days previous. The dog was thin, and had 'road rash' on it's chest. This nutcase took the dog in for shots and neutering*, he and the *vet decided that this dog's owner obviously dumped the dog out of a moving car. I told him that he had no right to neuter that dog, as he was under the obligation of our law to report having found the dog, and that the owner had a right to reclaim it.

I suggested that the dog could have been stolen, been part of a 'custody' battle, the owner could be in the hospital with someone else looking after the dog. But noo, this idiot with his all-knowing attitude just KNEW that the owner was unfit, yet wanted *me* to take the dog. Fat chance, that. I told him there was no way in hell I was getting involved in the mess he'd created, that he'd have to dig himself out. The he got mad at me, saying it would be MY fault if he put the dog down.

;-)
People suck.
Debbie
Most shelters have to fight, tooth & nail, for every little bit of funding they get and unfortunately numbers on their books can negatively impact them.

believe me, i know how financially strapped county offices are. it seems to me, though, that the "returned to owner" stats would be pretty important. and, IME, most shelters require that the original owner pay a fine when picking up a found dog, so the shelter wouldn't be out any money if it had to return the adoption fee to the adoptive owner.
Back then it was only a 3 day hold and this was day 2. I could have easily lost my ... of the 2 departments solely responsible for taking in dogs that one of them would have had a freakin clue.

that's a sobering thought.
the shelters i've dealt with have insisted that the owner come in person to look at the dogs, just to avoid that sort of situation. the old director (and staff) of the Muncie shelter wouldn't even hazard a guess as to whether or not your animal was there, no matter how well you could describe it.

shelly (perfectly foul wench) and elliott and harriet http://home.bluemarble.net/~scouvrette
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