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@news20.bellglobal.com:
Perhaps this is a stupid question, but why are you not suppose to keep a collar on unattended dogs?

I wouldn't say you're not supposed to, but that it's a personal decision.

In addition to the two-dog scenario which I posted about here last month, I think I once came home to find my dog attached by his collar to a heating vent on the floor. I've no idea how long he was like that.

So now my dog doesn't wear a collar when inside.
Cate
i would hope so, but i wouldn't want to assume anything. i can see how protecting the adopter's rights, regardless ... acting appropriately, could invalidate the original owner's claim to the dog. yucky, but i can see how it could happen.

Orson was on a 7-day hold (maybe it was 5 I can't remember) before we adopted him. Even after we brought him home, I had fears of someone recognizing him, because I knew that I couldn't keep someone else's dog if he was wanted. I would've had the law on my side, but not my own morals. It would've broken my heart, but I'd have given him back.

(This does not, however, negate my course to Malebolge, or whatever circle of hell I qualified for by cheating on the quiz.)
oh yeah. i'm not sue-happy, but if something like that happened to me, i'd definitely take whatever legal action i could. if nothing else, i'd want to stop the same thing from happening to anyone else.

Yep. I'd get sue-happy in a jiffy in this case.
Cate
The he got mad at me, saying it would be MY fault if he put the dog down. ;-)

What an ass.
People suck.

'Hell is other people.'
Cate
I wouldn't say you're not supposed to, but that it's a personal decision.

yep. it's something each owner is going to have to weigh the pros and cons of.
I once came home to find my dog attached by his collar to a heating vent on the floor. I've no idea how long he was like that.

i was trying to remember whose dog got stuck that way! i've been waffling on whether take my dogs' collars off when they're indoors. i worry about the safety aspect
(specifically, that i have loose, worrisome floor vents), but i also worry about them getting out while they're nekkid. they're good about waiting, but all it takes is seeing one rabbit for them to lose their branes.

shelly (perfectly foul wench) and elliott and harriet http://home.bluemarble.net/~scouvrette
I wouldn't say you're not supposed to, but that it's a personal decision.

yep. it's something each owner is going to have to weigh the pros and cons of.

Something else to take into account when weighing pros & cons is that if the dog likes to bolt out open doors & fence gates, an uncollared dog is often viewed, by both the public & animal control, as a street walker/stray. Therefore it may be more prone to someone taking the dog in and never reporting it to the authorities.

Tara
yep. it's something each owner is going to have to weigh the pros and cons of.

Something else to take into account when weighing pros & cons is that if the dog likes to bolt out ... it may be more prone to someone taking the dog in and never reporting it to the authorities. Tara

And there in lies the pro I view as the most important. Even though non of my dogs are very likely to bolt out the door and take off. One never knows. And since Reznor is intact and will remain so for quite a while I certainly am not willing to take that risk. But he is also getting microchipped
in a few weeks too.
Gwen
Something else to take into account when weighing pros & cons is that if the dog likes to bolt out ... walker/stray. Therefore it may be more prone to someone taking the dog in and never reporting it to the authorities.

I think that's why this story has me in such a lather because this could happen to me. Luckily, Orson doesn't count escaping the yard or the house among his goals.
Ok, there was the time in the early days he got out (it only took that one time for DH to learn to latch the back gate) and held the mailman at bay in the street.
Cate
Something else to take into account when weighing pros & cons is that if the dog likes to bolt out open doors & fence gates, an uncollared dog is often viewed, by both the public & animal control, as a street walker/stray.

absolutely, which is why i'm still waffling. my dogs don't bolt (and are good about "wait"ing), but they *do* tend to lose their branes when they see critters.
Therefore it may be more prone to someone taking the dog in and never reporting it to the authorities.

yes, but after hearing people who ought to know better support keeping loose dogs (both here and IRL), i'm pretty pessimistic about the chances of someone finding my dog and returning it, whether it's got ID or not.
so, i'm still waffling.

shelly (perfectly foul wench) and elliott and harriet http://home.bluemarble.net/~scouvrette
yes, but after hearing people who ought to know better support keeping loose dogs (both here and IRL), i'm pretty ... whether it's got ID or not. so, i'm still waffling. shelly (perfectly foul wench) and elliott and harriet http://home.bluemarble.net/~scouvrette

Yep. I am almost certain no one who found Reznor would return him.
Blade OTOH would be returned ASAP, I am fairly sure. He is such a handful. Though there is that mentality around here that might just see that as a grand ole asset to have being quite the handful and stick him outside on a 6' chain.Emotion: sad(
Clovis depending on who took her, and what other animals they had in the house as well as kiddos depends. Some may be likely to keep her and others would bring her back ASAP.

Gwen
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