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Wish I could say that surprises me. :-/
Debbie
It's about time that dog was spayed, too. Unaltered dogs are more likely to roam.
@news20.bellglobal.com:

Perhaps this is a stupid question, but why are you not suppose to keep a collar on unattended dogs?

I wouldn't say you're not supposed to, but that it's a personal decision. In addition to the two-dog scenario which I ... attached by his collar to a heating vent on the floor. I've no idea how long he was like that.

Was he ok?
And I thought I was the only one...
Now bear in mind that we did a very stoopid thing - Dylan had a choke collar on, and somehow the loop on the end of the collar dropped into a slot and turned, so she couldn't pull free. Damn dog ripped the three-foot long aluminum strip right out of the floor. She was gated in a 10x10 room, with a metal gate. Her clanging the heat vent against the gate was enough to set off the burglar alarm, and we and the cops arrived at our house about the same time. It was only after determining that no one had broken in and seeing the vent on her collar that we figured out what had happened.

We were extremely lucky - she wasn't hurt. And that was the last time she wore a choke collar.
FurPaw

Brain cells come and brain cells go, but fat cells live forever.

To reply, unleash the dog.
my neighbors have a dog door and give their dogs 24/7 access to their dog yard. there's no way i could do that.

Yup. For the very same reasons that my dogs stay in my yard (even with the gate open, I've discovered) while I'm at home, I wouldn't trust them in the yard while I'm not there.

Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
But the shelter wouldn't be taking the dog away from the adopters because the adopters didn't take possession of her ... shelter. It was a simple matter of phoning the adopter and telling them what happened then offering their money back.

They could offer their money back, but the adopter is under no obligation to accept that offer. That actually sounds very much like what happened. The problem is that the dog becomes the legal property of the new adopter at the point where they sign the adoption papers and pay for the spay (to be done the next day).
This is a tragedy, of course, but it does point out some important things that have to be done if a dog is lost. It seems pretty clear to me, knowing that shelter's layout, that the owner went through the shelter a couple of times looking for her dog, but didn't fill out a lost report or talk to a volunteer.
Lynn K.
This is a very one sided reporting, slanted to make Ms.Karanastasis the sympathetic beat up on by a beauracracy poor immigrant. Not saying that isn't* the truth, but do remember that papers are in the business of creating shitstorms where none exist sometimes and not reporting *TRUTH.
She says* she went to the shelter several times and didn't see her dog. Could it be that she did make the trip but didn't look at at *all of the kennels? I don't know how this particular shelter is staffed, but at ours, it's darn difficult to see that everyone coming through the door to wander about has a personal escort. Without that guidance from a staff member, isn't it possible that she didn't realize that there were two separate areas for the dogs? Isn't it possible that her three previous trips might have been phone calls instead to whomever answers the phone there and who doesn't have a great familiarity with the new dogs? Is it possible that Ms.

Karanastasis isn't* really the owner of this animal and has no paperwork to back up her claim of ownership? Or that there *were reasons to deny her readopting the dog in favor of someone else?
All of this may* be possible, or none of it. None of the comments from the Humane Society representatives shed enough light on the situation at all. I know that they are on the defensive here and trying to limit any information exposure, but that doesn't necessarily mean that they are at fault. It just means that they are a public organization whose image is being damaged severely in the media at this time.Similar situations have occurred at our shelter with different results depending on each individual situation. Generally, our *first priority has been to reunite the pet with the rightful owner, but it isn't always a simple black and white issue. Occasionally, the "rightful owner" can't produce any type of paper work to show the dog is really theirs, not even a shot record at a low cost clinic. We've both denied the owner readoption rights and also readopted to the owner after some education and assistance.

Yes, we have similar city laws to deal with as it sounds this Humane Society does. But, we try to treat each situation as individual cases, keeping the best interests of the animal in mind. The best interests of the animal do not always coincide with the "rights" of the owner, unfortunately, as anyone in rescue well knows.It's entirely possible that this is one of those cases where the animal was better rehomed than with the original owner, thus the dogmatic stance on "this is the law and we're following the law". It's hard to form an opinion with the minimal and biased facts reported in that brief artical, and they certainly wouldn't want to face a libel suit by saying, "My 88 year old grandmother could have dug out of that fence. And, there was just a plywood doghouse with no shade and scummy green water.

The dog had fleas so badly that you couldn't spot a square inch without them. Etc." All I can say is that I'd prefer to keep an open mind, and for once have the less cynical response that politics and favortism don't seem (at this time) to have anything to do with the decision that was made. (Or would it be even more cynical to think that Ms. Karanastasis might not totally be the "wronged party" here?)
I could, of course, be completely wrong, but I would hope that animal welfare advocates would at least be aware of enough potential problems with setting the blind precedent that they seem to want to adopt. Most have enough personal animals and have experienced enough of "escapes" and "ran out the doors" to not call the kettle too darn black at least without a smidgen of darn negative fact behind it.
But the shelter wouldn't be taking the dog away from ... and telling them what happened then offering their money back.

They could offer their money back, but the adopter is under no obligation to accept that offer. That actually sounds ... a couple of times looking for her dog, but didn't fill out a lost report or talk to a volunteer.

It seems to me if the owner can document that she was there looking for the dog, the burden of proof is on the shelter to demonstrate that they did not willfully hide the dog so they could give it to some rich-*** contributor. I hope they get their pants dragged off 'em in court, and I think they will, too. I'll bet lawyers all over the area are volunteering their services.
Don't you think it's ironic that the rightful owner was suddenly able to find her dog at the shelter as soon as it was too late and the wait period had elapsed by one freaken day?
Charlie
This is a very one sided reporting, slanted to make Ms.Karanastasis the sympathetic beat up on by a beauracracy poor immigrant.

I wouldn't say that at all. The reporter interviewed the people from the shelter, who could have made any of your speculative arguments but made none of them.
They kept this dog out of sight because one of their patrons wanted it. That has the ring of truth, and it will continue to be my working assumption unless someone introduces new information of which you offer none, merely speculation.
Charlie
Something else to take into account when weighing pros & ... in and never reporting it to the authorities. Tara

And there in lies the pro I view as the most important. Even though non of my dogs are very ... I certainly am not willing to take that risk. But he is also getting microchipped in a few weeks too.

Just thinking out loud here, but if JQP finds him and doesn't turn him into a shelter, a microchip might not help. I would tattoo as well. Would that affect showing at all?
I still miss the boxer girl we had here for a short time, but I can't totally regret returning her. Even if it wasn't the best dog home, they did miss their dog.

Paula
"Paula talks tough, and she wears vicious lipstick, but she lacks the depth of hate that I have spent many years cultivating." The Avocado Avenger
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