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This is a very one sided reporting, slanted to make Ms.Karanastasis the sympathetic beat up on by a beauracracy poor immigrant.

I wouldn't say that at all. The reporter interviewed the people from the shelter, who could have made any of ... continue to be my working assumption unless someone introduces new information of which you offer none, merely speculation. Charlie

"> They kept this dog out of sight because one of their patrons wanted
Have you considered the breakaway collars? I have the fear ... these collars and will use regular collars for walks etc.

I have considered these collars, until I heard from several persons in my Agility Club that they work too good, ie they don't stay on. Gwen[/nq]I use them and they are okay. I have only lost one or two. I wasn't there either time, so I am not sure what they were up to when they lost one. I have always figured they were wrestling or something and losing it was a good thing. It may or may not be true, but it makes me feel better about replacing collars. Emotion: smile I don't use them for walking dogs who are not really calm and good with recalls because I don't want to chance a pull turning into a chase.

I think they are well worth it. My kids are a lot better now about doors and such and the dogs are pretty good about waiting, but I am still not a hundred percent sure that the kids won't leave a door ajar when something too interesting is going on outside. Better safe than sorry, so I'll replace them if I have to.

Paula
"Paula talks tough, and she wears vicious lipstick, but she lacks the depth of hate that I have spent many years cultivating." The Avocado Avenger
This is a very one sided reporting, slanted to make Ms.Karanastasis the sympathetic beat up on by a beauracracy poor immigrant.

I wouldn't say that at all. The reporter interviewed the people from the shelter, who could have made any of ... will continue to be my working assumption unless someone introduces new information of which you offer none, merely speculation.

Well, your theory is speculation too, of course. If anyone can actually prove that, or even make a case for it, then criminal charges should follow.
i can understand why the shelter can't take a dog ... to be protected, but this seems hideously unfair to me.

But the shelter wouldn't be taking the dog away from the adopters because the adopters didn't take possession of her ... can tell me their hands are tied if they are still in physical possession of the dog. That's a crock.[/nq]I can't believe that they wouldn't talk to the new adopters about it, either. Tied hands are not tied hands, if you know what I mean. How many new adopters who haven't even taken the dog home are going to look those owners in the eyes and insist on taking the dog? I would be willing to bet that most would be happy to wait for another dog to be available before they have bonded with the dog in their home rather than do that to people who had bonded to the dog in their home.

Also, wouldn't they want the shelter to do the same for them? I do wonder about the idea of someone at the shelter wanting the dog. That would explain the hardcore attitude as well as the dog not showing up in any kennels when it was being looked for. Probably convinced he or she was doing the best thing for the dog, too, since how could a dog loose without a collar be well cared for? I hope that isn't the case, but if it is, I hope it all comes out and the shelter is humiliated for helping someone do that to frantic people searching for their dog.

I hope they at least have to come up with some explanation for why these people never saw their dog in repeated visits to the shelter looking for it.

Paula
"Paula talks tough, and she wears vicious lipstick, but she lacks the depth of hate that I have spent many years cultivating." The Avocado Avenger
It seems to me if the owner can document that she was there looking for the dog, the burden of ... 'em in court, and I think they will, too. I'll bet lawyers all over the area are volunteering their services.

Not knowing this particular shelter, but knowing (3) others...

If you don't tell the staff that you are there looking for a stray, you are very likely to miss at least a few animals of either species (cat/dog) that are either in quarantine or being treated.
I can browse all three shelters that I've worked in under 10 minutes if the dog was removed for treatment, put in a crate to wait for a few minutes, treated, put back until the staffer came back it could be upwards of a hour before the dog was back in the stray runs.
Secondly, without telling a staff member that you have lost a dog, you are also missing out on any stray calls they may have received, as well as any pickups that are in the trucks or scheduled for later in the day or even is in the "roadkill" pickup pile or was euthanized due to injuries.

Thirdly, the friend that came through. Now, I have one relatively identifiable dog (while the breed is common, the color and markings aren't, he's still a puppy, he has decent conformation which most shelter Labs don't, and he's microchipped). I doubt that even my closest friends (and I'd wager parents, if the dog's recognition wasn't taken into consideration) could pick my other two out if they were in a lineup of four or five others of their breed & color & relative age.
In all truth, the original owners should be thankful that their dog is in a home that cares about her the other options are really either dead or in a research lab.

Emily Carroll
Fluttervale Labradors: www.fluttervale.com
CPG: www.geocities.com/cyberpetgame/
4-H Club: www.geocities.com/woofsandwiggles/
My emotional response is based on my strong attachment to my own dog. Have you ever been attached to a dog? How would you feel if you found out your dog had a new "owner" less than a week after it went missing, and the system was siding with the new "owner" rather than yourself? If it happened to me, it would *** up my life in a BIG way.

Charlie
I wouldn't say that at all. The reporter interviewed the ... new information of which you offer none, merely speculation.

Well, your theory is speculation too, of course. If anyone can actually prove that, or even make a case for it, then criminal charges should follow.

Yes. I am speculating with respect to ~why~ things happened. BUT, we all know who didn't end up getting their dog back.

Keep in mind that the shelter hasn't offered any "arguments" for their position except the bland technical assertion that the law is on their side. No one, for example, has suggested that the rightful owner mistreated the dog, or failed to take an interest when it went missing. In fact, it is a well-socialized pet that arrived in beautiful condition, which is why it is desirable for an upscale family in Los Gatos.
They probably don't want to have to bother house-training a puppy because of their expensive rugs etc.
Charlie
In all truth, the original owners should be thankful that their dog is in a home that cares about her the other options are really either dead or in a research lab.

Is that how you would feel if you lost Rusty and someone else ended up with him? It's a pretty harsh POV, and I don't think the public agrees with you about this. I think the public believes strongly that the rightful owner should get her dog back.
Charlie
all i can say is, microchip your pets!!!

Also, don't leave your pets unattended in the yard when you aren't home. She's fortunate, at least, that her dog ... and scary that one could lose their dog to another person, but at least she knows the dog is safe.[/nq]I had to go to a home to drop something off over the weekend and I took my daughters with me. The home was in a pretty rural area, and as we went to the door, two dogs came from across the street to greet us. My daughters were horrified that the dogs got out and were wandering around where "they might get hit by a car!" When I told them that the dogs had not "got out" but had been out in the front yard, which was not in any way fenced off from any back yard, when we drove up, they were really horrified.

They couldn't believe that people would let their dogs run around where they might get hit by cars because dogs don't know any better, you know! I guess they have been completely indoctrinated in my attempts to teach them to be careful of doors and gates and dogs. When I was growing up, though, in a not rural area at all, most of the neighborhood dogs roamed the streets, getting into trash cans of people who hated dogs enough to poison them and chasing kids on bikes.

It's a wonder they lived to old age.

Paula
"Paula talks tough, and she wears vicious lipstick, but she lacks the depth of hate that I have spent many years cultivating." The Avocado Avenger
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