Like I mentioned, we have a 3 3/4 month old lovebird. When do you give them their first bath and how do you get them to take it? I filled a pie pan with lukewarm water tonight and tried setting him down on the edge but kept flying off away from it. I even demonstrated by splashing my hand in it, but no way.
But I understand that they bathe in the wild about twice a week?
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Like I mentioned, we have a 3 3/4 month old lovebird. When do you give them their first bath and ... my hand in it, but no way. But I understand that they bathe in the wild about twice a week?

Most birds bathe in the wild daily. I bought a special suction cup perch for our Hahn's Macaw and she hears the word shower and comes charging from wherever she is.
For some reason, she likes when the water is very cool, bordering on cold. As soon as I get it cool, her wings start flapping around and she just loves it.
I cannot get her to bathe in a bird bath, but after her shower she then tries to go into her water dish to take a bath! She's fully soaked to the bone, but continues trying.
You can start out by using a new water sprayer with a misting head on it and see what reaction you get by gently spraying. Never spray in the nose or ears, but the droplets should come from above.
Like I mentioned, we have a 3 3/4 month old ... that they bathe in the wild about twice a week?

Most birds bathe in the wild daily.

Christ, what is it with you? Could you not just stop here after you answered the question, instead of "treating" the group to another boring-as-batshit episode in the life of Mika? No, of course not, we are blessed with the following;
I bought a special suction cup perch for our Hahn's Macaw and she hears the word shower and comes charging ... tries to go into her water dish to take a bath! She's fully soaked to the bone, but continues trying.

Does Mika know you are blabbing every excruciating detail and nuance of her life on usenet? Shouldn't Mika be entitled to a little privacy instead of having her bathing habits, the consistency of her turds and how she only eats "wild" linguini broadcast to all and sundry? Try to show a little restraint; Mika is probably cringing in embarrassment.

With kind regards
Chu
Like I mentioned, we have a 3 3/4 month old lovebird. When do you give them their first bath and ... my hand in it, but no way. But I understand that they bathe in the wild about twice a week?

Birds as pets are very individual in their habits, likes and dislikes. This may be a result of what they have been exposed to at a young age.

The noise from the vacuum cleaner sends most of my birds to their water dish for a bath. I think the vac may have rain-like harmonics.

Cricket, my green-cheeked conure is a cute bather. When she is on my shoulder, I go to the kitchen sink and run the cold (colder the better for her) water into my cupped hands. She runs down my arm and bathes in my "hands tub." She also runs under the stream of water from the faucet. She gets her belly way down in the pool and puts her head in the pool as well. She wiggles and flips her wings in the water, really enjoying the bath. The interesting thing is, she only tolerates a spray bottle shower.
You'll just have to try different things. One thing I would suggest when offering a pan of water is to be sure it is stable. I've used Pyrex glass pie pans successfully. The light weight and potential for movement of an aluminum pie pan might be unreliable and frighten a bird investigating its possibilities.
J
Like I mentioned, we have a 3 3/4 month old ... that they bathe in the wild about twice a week?

Birds as pets are very individual in their habits, likes and dislikes. This may be a result of what they ... sends most of my birds to their water dish for a bath. I think the vac may have rain-like harmonics.

LOL!
Cricket, my green-cheeked conure is a cute bather. When she is on my shoulder, I go to the kitchen sink ... weight and potential for movement of an aluminum pie pan might be unreliable and frighten a bird investigating its possibilities.

I tried a pie pan first and he wouldnt get near it. I filled it with nice warm water too. No way.
So I called the lady who sold him to us and asked her what to do, and she said that they trains young birds to bathe by running some warm water in the sink faucet and just holding them in it until soaked good.

I tried that last night with him and he struggled but got a good bath, then when I pulled him out, he wasn't even upset with me, he walked right up my hand and arm to my shoulder, sat there and shook himself off, then stayed there.
The only thing is that he was shivering for awhile from being wet. Denver is dry and if you stay wet after a shower, it makes it cold, from the evaporation.
Should I get a little 75W clip on heat lamp for his cage, just for after baths? Or would it dry his skin too much?
I can tell he's feeling better today though. No more of that mad biting of his feathers and picking at them. He was getting itchy because he went for too long without a bath.
It's getting so I can read his needs, which is very cool.
I tried a pie pan first and he wouldnt get near it. I filled it with nice warm water too. ... he went for too long without a bath. It's getting so I can read his needs, which is very cool.

I don't think I would subject my bird to a bath while restraining him. He may not have reacted afterward because of being a bit shocked over the treatment.
You may want to try a spray bottle of warm water set on the finest possible mist for his next bath.
Regarding the clip-on heater idea: I would not use anything you can walk away from. You could forget and come back to an overheated or worse bird.
I would put him in a room with no drafts at 70 degrees or higher. You can blot him with paper towels. He shouldn't shiver because that means he is experiencing stress. You can cover his cage 75% with a towel while he dries. Give baths around noon so he's dry before the sun goes down.
J
I tried a pie pan first and he wouldnt get ... so I can read his needs, which is very cool.

I don't think I would subject my bird to a bath while restraining him. He may not have reacted afterward ... not use anything you can walk away from. You could forget and come back to an overheated or worse bird.

It would only be in one corner of the large cage, so he could get away from it if he wanted, or sit in front of it if he wanted. But would his judgement be ok? That's my question.
I would put him in a room with no drafts at 70 degrees or higher.

Ain't gonna happen here in Denver in the fall-spring months. We can't afford to keep the house that warm, for one thing, and it would dry the hell out of the whole house if we did, even our wall whole house humidifier couldn't keep up with that temperature when it gets cold out.

We keep the house at 65 in the day and 60 at night in the fall-winter months when it gets cooler out.
You can blot him with paper towels. He shouldn't shiver because that means he is experiencing stress.

Yeah, it kinda does with us too.
We also got him a Happy Hut but he hasn't discovered what to do with it in his cage yet. Emotion: smile
You can cover his cage 75% with a towel while he dries. Give baths around noon so he's dry before the sun goes down.

I kinda think a small heat lamp ( maybe 60-75 watts? ) shining in one corner of his cage, would be nice to turn on after baths for him. As long as he had the sense not to stay under it for too long after he was dry, but I'd imagine he'd get too warm and get out of there then.
I tried a pie pan first and he wouldnt get ... so I can read his needs, which is very cool.

I don't think I would subject my bird to a bath while restraining him. He may not have reacted afterward ... 75% with a towel while he dries. Give baths around noon so he's dry before the sun goes down. J

OR, you can buy a shower perch like I do and just bring the bird in the shower with you. Luke warm is too warm for most birds. Mika needs very cold water and if she isn't opening her feathers and hunkering down, it means it's not the right temperature.

Never force a bird. It has to be their idea or it's shocking to them. When he ran up your arm he was saying, please never do that again, please, please.
If you decide to buy a shower perch, you may also want to switch to a shower head with a hose attached. That way you can control how much water and at what rate it hits the bird.
Shivering is okay because it burns off the energy they'd normally burn off in the wild. In case I'm challenged on this point, I get my information from several sources, but mainly from the owner of Parrots of the World, Marc Marrone.
It would only be in one corner of the large cage, so he could get away from it if he wanted, or sit in front of it if he wanted. But would his judgement be ok? That's my question.

I would put him in a room with no drafts at 70 degrees or higher.

Ain't gonna happen here in Denver in the fall-spring months. We can't afford to keep the house that warm, for ... for too long after he was dry, but I'd imagine he'd get too warm and get out of there then.

If you use the lamp, put it far enough away from the cage so he can't touch it.
It isn't difficult to bring a bathroom to 70 degrees. The more important issue is that of eliminating draft.
I was going to suggest a hair dryer but I didn't know your age or level of responsibility. I have used a hair dryer on the lowest heat no closer than 18" to the bird in the winter. I lived in Broomfield for 40 years until last fall. I've even used the hair dryer on my little silkie chickens. There's nothing more beautiful than a bathed and blowed dry silkie.

I've found that my birds like cold baths and warm mists.

Sincerely,
Joanne
If it's right for you, then it's right, . . . . . for you!!!

http://www.jobird.com
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