We just got a very pretty tame sweet lovebird, our first bird actually, and brought him home from a private breeder.

She didn't sell food, so we stopped by the seed warehouse where we buy all out small black sunflower seed for the wild bird feeders. They said they didn't sell lovebird food, per se, but that all the lovebird owners just bought their cockatiel mix. Should that be ok for a lovebird?
We got a 25 lb bag of it, which should last this little guy quite awhile. He's about 3 1/2 months old.
I also noticed that he's not eating the bigger fruit chips and seeds in there, just the smaller ones. We tried giving him a few black russian sunflower seeds in his tray and they wound up in the bottom of the cage, discarded. We figure he just isn't big enough to appreciate or eat them yet, right?
1 2 3
We just got a very pretty tame sweet lovebird, our first bird actually, and brought him home from a private ... the bottom of the cage, discarded. We figure he just isn't big enough to appreciate or eat them yet, right?

~~
A good-quality cockatiel seed is what you should be feeding your lovebird. Cockatiel seed mix should include a wide variety of seeds as well as dehydrated fruits/veg and often small pellets. I feed my lovebirds "Hagen" and "Prestige" brands of cockatiel mix, but there are many varieties out there to choose from. Don't ever feed wild bird seed to your birds, as it's intended for the wild birds and isn't as clean or nutritious as seed intended for cage birds.Twenty-five pounds is a fair amount of seed. A large amount of seed such as what you've purchased can get stale or buggy if left standing in a warm location for too long a time. What I'd suggest you do is divide it into several smaller bags. Bag the whole lot of twenty-five pounds in freezer bags, put all the bags in the freezer and keep it in there for a couple of days.

After a couple of days, remove the bags and store them in the fridge or a very cool location away from heat sources. For convenience sake, you can just pour the seed from one bag you're using into a small Rubbermaid container and dole out the seed from there. All birds love millet sprays as well, so don't hesitate to give your lovebird millet on a regular basis.
In addition to seed, you should offer your lovebird fresh (and cooked) vegetables such as broccoli, celery, cauliflower, carrots, beans, corn, etc. Also fruits such as apples, pears, grapes, bananas, oranges, berries, melons, etc. Once in a while treats, such as good-quality dark breads or unsalted crackers, muslix cereal, rice cakes. You can also offer cooked noodles, brown and/or wild rice. Never feed avocado, chocolate, alcoholic beverages or junk foods like chips, cheesies, etc. Some folks sprout seeds for their birds as well.
Since your lovie is still a youngster, it may take him time to get used to new foods. Don't give up too quickly if he doesn't take to the new food right away. Just keep on putting it in his cage. Birds, like people, have their favourite foods, so it's very likely over time your lovebird will prefer some foods over others.
Make sure your bird has a nice variety of safe toys (made with lovebirds in mind) and gets a chance to come out of his cage on a regular basis. He should have ten to twelve hours of sleep a night as well.

I have several lovebirds (black-masked and peachface) and love them to bits. Most of them were "rescues" and several of them have handicaps but they're all so wonderful. I think lovebirds are among the most beautiful, intelligent and personable birds in the bird world. I hope that you'll enjoy your new little lovebird as much as I do mine.

Good luck and if you need more information or advice, please feel free to ask.

Linda
http://brightlion.com/InHope/InHope en.aspx
"In Hope, An Animal Shelter Story"
(warning: graphic content)
Be part of the solution, not part of the problem
... please spay or neuter your pets
Time to bag and freeze some of that 25 pounds of food for 1 lovebird. The food you got should be fine, but you will learn about seed moths in a few weeks without proper storage. 5 pounds at a time next time.

Who sold you a bird without teaching you what to feed the bird? Shame on someone.
Get some veggies at the local store and see what this little boy wants. In a week, you'll know.
Lovebirds are often given away. They are affectionate and loud. When you are too busy to play with him, he will get loud. Train this guy or he will train you.
We just got a very pretty tame sweet lovebird, our ... isn't big enough to appreciate or eat them yet, right?

~~ A good-quality cockatiel seed is what you should be feeding your lovebird. Cockatiel seed mix should include a wide ... birds, as it's intended for the wild birds and isn't as clean or nutritious as seed intended for cage birds.

Thanks.
Twenty-five pounds is a fair amount of seed. A large amount of seed such as what you've purchased can get stale or buggy if left standing in a warm location for too long a time.

We're in Colorado, a cool dry climate. Crackers in an open package can stay fine in the kitchen cabinet for a year or more.
What I'd suggest you do is divide it into several smaller bags. Bag the whole lot of twenty-five pounds in ... there. All birds love millet sprays as well, so don't hesitate to give your lovebird millet on a regular basis.

We have millet in the seed mix. What's different about those sprays? ( except they cost more? )
In addition to seed, you should offer your lovebird fresh (and cooked) vegetables such as broccoli, celery, cauliflower, carrots, beans, corn, etc. Also fruits such as apples, pears, grapes, bananas, oranges, berries, melons, etc.

We have, but he's gonna have to grow up a little first, I think. He's only 3 1/2 months old and so far he doesn't know what to do with those things and just leaves them. We gave him a few black russian sunflower seeds too ( in the shell - the stuff we feed to the wild birds ), and all they did was wind up on the paper beneath the cage.

He only seems to like small seed so far. There are square, colored larger chips in the cockatiel mix and he isn't eating them yet.
Once in a while treats, such as good-quality dark breads or unsalted crackers, muslix cereal, rice cakes.

I got some unsalted crackers and he isn't much into that yet either, he leaves most of it over. But I understand that mature birds love them.
You can also offer cooked noodles, brown and/or wild rice. Never feed avocado, chocolate, alcoholic beverages or junk foods like chips, cheesies, etc.

Wasn't one of the parrot owners here saying that their parrot loved potato chips? What about if we could get a few unsalted ones?
Since your lovie is still a youngster, it may take him time to get used to new foods. Don't give up too quickly

We won't give up at all, we're patient. Emotion: smile This is the greatest bird we've ever personally seen, such a sweetie.
if he doesn't take to the new food right away. Just keep on putting it in his cage.

Yes exactly. And we don't fill the food cup all the way up, so we can toss it out every 2 days and wash and refill it. The water comes through a solid carbon block filter and is changed daily. By changing it every day here, it always looks nice and clean.
Birds, like people, have their favourite foods, so it's very likely over time your lovebird will prefer some foods over others.

Uh huh.
Make sure your bird has a nice variety of safe toys (made with lovebirds in mind) and gets a chance to come out of his cage on a regular basis.

Oh yeah, he has lots of great toys and being he's so tame, he comes out of the cage for a few hours a day and sits on our shoulder. He's already learned to hop up on a hand or finger, just since Friday when we got him. He was tamed at just the right time by the breeder, she told us, and it really shows. He'll sit on our shoulder for hours. We put a clean dish towel up there for the poop. Emotion: smile
He flew off onto the floor Friday night once, and I reached my hand down to get him and he hopped on! We love this bird!
Then when he hops on our hand, he walks all the way up the arm to our shoulder and sits there. It's wonderful! He just toodles up your arm like he's out for a walk, using his beak to stabilize it. I never knew breeders could tame a bird like this, at that age, and by the time we got him, but we love this breeder now and we're even thinking of getting a second bird from her, which she says will be ready by January.
He should have ten to twelve hours of sleep a night as well.

Wow, that much? Ok.
I have several lovebirds (black-masked and peachface) and love them to bits. Most of them were "rescues" and several of them have handicaps but they're all so wonderful.

This little guy has a handicapped talon. It goes sideways instead of downwards. She said it was probably from being pecked by another bird as a baby. But he compensates by using his beak to stabilize himself when he climbs the cage bars etc. But he's such a sweet tame friendly bird, we just love him like crazy, even with his handicap.

Here are some pictures of him: http://www.lakewoodcolorado.net/BE/

This breeder doesn't have a store but has cages in the back room of her house. I wouldn't even have known about her unless someone else had told me about her in email. She specializes in breeding very colorful and unusual lovebirds, and lovebirds only. One of them looked almost like a sun conure, it had green, yellow and redish orange. Amazing.

Our bird has colors that I've never personally seen in a lovebird before ( though I'm no expert - this is our first bird ever ). He's mostly bright greenish yellow, with some orange in the face, white around the neck and vivid purple tail feathers. Wow.
You can see his sideways talon in the first photo there.
I think lovebirds are among the most beautiful, intelligent and personable birds in the bird world. I hope that you'll enjoy your new little lovebird as much as I do mine.

Thanks Linda, we already do. Emotion: smile
Good luck and if you need more information or advice, please feel free to ask.

Thank you! Emotion: smile
Feeding a seed mix only diet is very unhealthy for the bird. They also need fresh vegetables and fruit, pellets and very little seeds. My vet told me the other day I shouldn't offer any more than a tablespoon of seeds per day, but freely give her fresh vegetables, some fruit and free choice pellets. I'm fortunate that Mika likes pellets.
Feeding a seed mix only diet is very unhealthy for the bird. They also need fresh vegetables and fruit, pellets ... per day, but freely give her fresh vegetables, some fruit and free choice pellets. I'm fortunate that Mika likes pellets.

What if he won't eat them yet? Should I take a grape and cut it into strips maybe?
What are free choice pellets?
Most birds, if not all, love millet sprays. Some people give it only occasionally as a treat, but I give all my birds (budgies, lovebirds, parrotlets, linnies, and a quaker) spray millet on a regular basis, every three days or so. Also, spray millet is one of the first seed foods that a young bird will eat once it's weaned. I trust your bird is fully weaned and eating on its own. Some baby birds take longer to wean than others. It's really important to make certain that your baby lovebird is eating on his own and not only picking through the seed like he's playing with it.

A responsible, caring, ethical breeder will not allow a bird to go to a new owner before the bird is weaned and eating on its own. From your previous post, I'm assuming your bird is, in fact, eating on his own. If not, get in touch with the breeder immediately and explain that he's fussing with his food and not eating. In spite of having cups full of seed all around them, some very young birds will starve to death.
In addition to seed, you should offer your lovebird fresh ... such as apples, pears, grapes, bananas, oranges, berries, melons, etc.

We have, but he's gonna have to grow up a little first, I think. He's only 3 1/2 months old ... small seed so far. There are square, colored larger chips in the cockatiel mix and he isn't eating them yet.[/nq]Most birds won't eat everything in a seed mix. Like people, they can be picky and have likes and dislikes and will eat what appeals to them. A lot of birds refuse to eat most fruits and vegetables, and some will just zero in on their favourites. I've offered bananas to my flock, but it's mostly my quaker who will eat them. Right now, just make sure George is eating seed since you've only just gotten him.

Since he's just a youngster, it's important that he realizes that seed equals food and not just something to play with and throw around. All my birds prefer the larger sunflower seed that is striped rather than the tiny black variety. Later on, you can also offer other sorts of nuts (fresh from the shell, not salted). Some of my birds will eat peanuts and cashews and the occasional walnut.

The odd chip or cheesie won't kill your bird, but keep this stuff to a minimum.
Since your lovie is still a youngster, it may take him time to get used to new foods. Don't give up too quickly

We won't give up at all, we're patient. Emotion: smile This is the greatest bird we've ever personally seen, such a sweetie.

A handraised bird is a real joy. Since your lovebird is so young, this is the best time to bond with him by interacting with him regularly, lots of handling and chatting. Out-of-cage time is important as well.

He sounds just wonderful. Emotion: surprise)
He flew off onto the floor Friday night once, and I reached my hand down to get him and he ... now and we're even thinking of getting a second bird from her, which she says will be ready by January.[/nq]A second bird might not be the greatest idea. If you do keep the two of them separate, spending time with them as individuals, and not as a pair, you will most likely land up with two very tame pets. However, if you decide to put the two of them together in the same cage as buddies, they'll lose that special interest they have in you and bond with each other. Your baby lovebird sees you as his new best friend and to keep that friendship strong and on-going, it would be best to keep him as a single pet.

I have lovebirds that grew up together and they're not tame. Only three of my lovebirds are very tame and were raised as single pets. These three, Pasha, Sydney and Willy, were handraised and lived alone as single pets until I took them in. All remain very affectionate and loving. They each have their own cage and really don't interact with any of the other lovebirds, but are bonded with me.
He should have ten to twelve hours of sleep a night as well.

Wow, that much? Ok.

Ideally ten to twelve hours, but many get by on less. Birds nap during the day as well. Some folks cover their birds' cages once evening sets in, but I don't as I have too many cages. However, my birds have their own room so come nighttime, I shut the blinds and lights and keep the door to their room three-quarters closed so as not to disturb them with noises from other parts of the house.
I have several lovebirds (black-masked and peachface) and love them ... several of them have handicaps but they're all so wonderful.

This little guy has a handicapped talon. It goes sideways instead of downwards. She said it was probably from being ... bars etc. But he's such a sweet tame friendly bird, we just love him like crazy, even with his handicap.

As far as physical handicaps go, I have lovebirds with parts of toes missing. However, this isn't an impediment and they manage to get around very well. My Willy lovebird was given away because he suffers from occasional seizures. Sydney lovebird was given away because she was extremely bitey and aggressive but she's tamed down very nicely since I've had her.
Here are some pictures of him::http//www.lakewoodcolorado.net/BE/[/nq]
Gorgeous George ... LOL ! He's a variety of peachface. Besides one male normal green peachface, I also have two female lutino peachfaces and a male Dutch blue peachface. I consider lovebirds to be one of the most attractive species, but I think I'm somewhat prejudiced ... LOL !!!
This breeder doesn't have a store but has cages in the back room of her house. I wouldn't even have ... and lovebirds only. One of them looked almost like a sun conure, it had green, yellow and redish orange. Amazing.

I have a male lovebird very similar to what you've described. Sparkle is a lutino Fischers lovebird and his colouring can be compared to a sun conure. He has a bright red-orange beak as well ... very good-looking. His mate, Twinkle, is a lutino peachface. Both birds were given up because Twinkle has a neurological disorder which makes her shake a good deal of the time, something similar to human Parkinsons.
Our bird has colors that I've never personally seen in a lovebird before ( though I'm no expert - this ... around the neck and vivid purple tail feathers. Wow. You can see his sideways talon in the first photo there.

You're welcome. Good luck with George and wishing you many, many happy years together.

Linda
http://brightlion.com/InHope/InHope en.aspx
"In Hope, An Animal Shelter Story"
(warning: graphic content)
Be part of the solution, not part of the problem
... please spay or neuter your pets
Feeding a seed mix only diet is very unhealthy for ... and free choice pellets. I'm fortunate that Mika likes pellets.

What if he won't eat them yet? Should I take a grape and cut it into strips maybe? What are free choice pellets?

You should immediately call the breeder you bought it from and find out if the bird was fully weaned. I cannot believe they let you out of their place with a bird which potentially is not weaned fully. Grapes are not a good idea. They are way too sugary for pet birds and don't have much in the way of nutrition. Much better would be blueberries. Better yet, you should try to get a book on love birds or at least go look at websites. How long has it been since your bird ate food?
"Free choice" means it is not measured. I give her a full forage station full of pellets with the seed underneath so it gives her something to dig around for.
I cannot believe they let you out of their place with a bird which potentially is not weaned fully.

I'm not even sure what you mean by that. She said it's weaned.
Grapes are not a good idea. They are way too sugary for pet birds and don't have much in the way of nutrition.

He won't eat them so far anyway.
Much better would be blueberries. Better yet, you should try to get a book on love birds or at least go look at websites.

We have 2 books and have been reading them. But it seems like if you ask
4 different experts about these things, people who claim to have decadesof experience with lovebirds, you will get 4 different answers, some contradictory.
How long has it been since your bird ate food?

He eats all the time, if you mean the seed mix.
"Free choice" means it is not measured. I give her a full forage station full of pellets with the seed underneath so it gives her something to dig around for.

Ah.
We went to Petsmart today and they apparently don't even know what these pellets are. They seemed stumped. They looked around and couldn't find me any food for lovebirds ( or cockatiels ) that said "pellets".
Show more