I bought my sister aa 8 month old Greenwinged Macaw (Murphy) 2 weeks ago. We took him to see the Avian vet today, he specialises in Macaws. He gave him a clean bill of health but there were a few problems. Both his wings had been clipped very badly, he has no tail due to sliding down the bars of his cage and snapping them. He has been kept in his cage and hasnt been able to develop any flight muscle and he has fret marks on his feathers due to a poor diet while being handreared. The breeder told the previous owner to feed him pellets and nuts! While my sister has had him he hasnt eaten a single pellet.

4 days ago I put him on a seed diet, Parrot eggfood everyday and a varietyof fresh fruit and veg. He is a totaly different bird, he is playfull, talkative and never keeps still. The vet has told us to keep him on this diet and give him lots of TLC. How many other breeders are selling birds that arent reared properley, given a poor diet and little advice. And clip their own birds wings so badly that it affects the birds balance!! Ray
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I bought my sister aa 8 month old Greenwinged Macaw (Murphy) 2 weeks ago.We took him to see the Avian ... poor diet and little advice. And clip their own birds wings so badly that it affects the birds balance!! Ray

There are many poor breeders out there, just as there are poor shops. The main thing is to not do business with either, but since you already did about all you can do is hope the bird will be OK. Macaws make a great pet, good luck with the new baby!

"A committee is a life form with six or more legs and no brain" (Lazarus Long)
He gave him a clean bill of health but there were a few problems. Both his wings had been clipped very badly, he has no tail due to sliding down the

Okay, now I'm curious. I clip my cockatoos' wings myself, and I wasn't really aware that it could be done "badly." I use a claw-trimmer designed for use on cats to clip one feather at a time, and I leave the three or four or so innermost and outermost feathers on each wing (mostly for aesthetic reasons), plus at least one feather on either side of any blood feather (to protect it).
I've been doing this for years and I haven't noticed any problems. The birds can still fly, kind of, but only in a more or less straight line and only short distances.
Based on this admittedly sketchy description, does anyone reckon I should be doing something differently? I'll talk to my real-life parrot-nut friends as well...
Regards,
/Peter
He gave him a clean bill of health but there ... very badly, he has no tail due to sliding downthe

Okay, now I'm curious. I clip my cockatoos' wings myself, and I wasn't really aware that it could be done ... description, does anyone reckon I shouldbe doing something differently? I'll talk to my real-life parrot-nut friends as well... Regards, /Peter

The wings looked like they were cut with a blunt pair of scissors. Ray
He gave him a clean bill of health but there ... very badly, he has no tail due to sliding downthe

Okay, now I'm curious. I clip my cockatoos' wings myself, and I wasn't really aware that it could be done ... description, does anyone reckon I shouldbe doing something differently? I'll talk to my real-life parrot-nut friends as well... Regards, /Peter

Sounds like your doing fine. With our birds the only thing we are after is we want the bird not to be able to take off outside, but be able to fall softly if they come off their cage. It's hard to get right with the Tiel some times we take a little at a time, with the Macaw it's just a matter of clipping 4 primaries on each side.

"A committee is a life form with six or more legs and no brain" (Lazarus Long)
He gave him a clean bill of health but there were a few problems. Both his wings had been clipped very badly(snip)

Okay, now I'm curious. I clip my cockatoos' wings myself, and I wasn't really aware that it could be done "badly." Regards, /Peter

I took Peaches the lovebird to the vet because she had been banded and the band was bugging her. She had started tugging at it and generally worrying at it. She'd started feather plucking around the top of that leg. Oh no, must nip that in the bud! He concurred with my assessment and removed the band, which isn't required unless a bird is imported.

When the vet examined her he said her wings had been badly clipped. He guessed when she was being hand fed and got to the point of fledging, the breeder simply clipped the flight wings sort of willy-nilly; not straight across. So yes, apparently it can be badly done.
Jill
I took Peaches the lovebird to the vet because she had been banded and the band was bugging her. She ... in the bud! He concurred with my assessment and removed the band, which isn't required unless a bird is imported.

Actually it is a valuable method of identification should you lose your bird.
The breeder I deal with refuses to band. She has told me of a number of incidents where problems have resulted from bands including:

o thieves actually breaking a bird's foot to remove the band. o birds getting the band caught on something and injuring themselves.

She tells me that if you are interested in being able to identify your bird that microchipping is far superior to banding.

Bob
worrying Actually it is a valuable method of identification should you lose your bird.

The breeder I deal with refuses to band. She has told me of a number of incidents where problems have ... that microchipping is far superior to banding.Microchipping is introducing a foreign body into your pet and can have dire results.

Out of all 90 odd birds I have here, the majority are banded, both caged and aviary birds. In the 30 years I have kept birds, I have never had a bird caught up by the band.
I think statistically a bird being caught by the band is very very very slight. As I said before, it is a valuable means of identification if your bird gets lots, plus, should you keepp several birds and perhaps wish to breed, a band will show you who bred the bird, how old it is etc.
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