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How so?

Heh. My answer depends upon your question.
If it has to do with the DW-Teeter - I've disagreed with the current "teach the teeter before dogwalk" methodology before. All I have offer in rebuttal is teaching the opposite with no issues.
If it's to do with the foundation point of my statement, I believe that if a dog has been properly trained on each piece of equipment, with commands that differentiate that piece of equipment from another, there shouldn't be an issue. That said, *** happens.

Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
How so?

Heh. My answer depends upon your question. If it has to do with the DW-Teeter - I've disagreed with the current "teach the teeter before dogwalk" methodology before. All I have offer in rebuttal is teaching the opposite with no issues.

and I've seen a pretty good number of dogs have problems when it's taught that way, whereas I've never seen a dog with an issue when the teeter is taught first. Try it, my bet is, you'll like it!
Honestly, that doesn't mean much (sorry). I know several truly awful trainers with similar or even higher credentials. Not at all to say your trainer falls in this group, but if she is keeping up on training trends, she should have at least knowledge of teaching the teeter first, and if she's not doing it she should have a good reason. Since Macula has demonstrated the classic response to teaching teeter after DW, I'd say it didn't work well for her.
She has taught contacts, and given us ways of teaching it at home. If our dog blows off a contact during a run, she has us stop immediately and have the dog do it correctly.

What is she doing to prevent it happening in the first place?
Macula has the tendency, particularly at the beginning of class (when her energy reserves are really high) to blow contacts ... I slow her right down before a contact to force her to do it properly instead of simply with enthusiasm.

Hmm. I don't care for this advice at all, and on several levels. Exactly what is your contact criteria? Slow down in the contact zone? 2-on 2-off? Sit? Down? Stop? Keep moving?
Generally, slowing down for the contact when the dog is already on the equipment is very imprecise and doesn't tend to hold up at all well in competition. Plus, if you're slowing your dog down that much then, well, you're slowing your dog down. I far prefer to help the dog understand how to keep top speed over the contact, do it with verve and joy, and STILL hit the contact. So for Macula tearing over the aframe top speed good girl! Way to show drive and enthusiasm! Instead of punishing her for it by making her slow down, work with the speed but help her understand what she needs to do at the end of each obstacle. Sort of slowing down enough to get feet in is not a good way to go. Trust me, I know this!