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I have a question which has nothing to do with any of the above. You mentioned that you're going to ... little training with MacKenzie, and less with Murphy than Madigan. Why aren't you taking one of them to this class?

Madigan assists me at work. She's my most highly trained, but she needs proofing. A little nip and tuck is all that's required for her to be a real asset as a demo dog. Since she of the 3 has a "job," her training is higher priority.
I'm still searching for a CGC test for her. Every one I've found scheduled in the area have been on work days. A couple of months ago, I knew she wouldn't pass the test. Now I think she has a really good chance of passing. She's come a long way in her behavior at the store.
The other two are in line. MacKenzie is next. She responds well at home now, but would benefit from the distractions of a class environment. Murphy is just such a naturally good dog that she may wait a long time for her turn. She just never gives me any trouble. All she needed to be taught to be a perfect pet is leave it, drop it, and wait.
When I say I don't train much at home, I'm talking about formal training sessions one-on-one. Training goes on constantly, though. It's something I stress to my classes, too, because I know these people aren't going to set aside much (if any) training time. I tell them to look for any and every opportunity in RL to teach the dog something. Especially if it involves learning patience and emotional control.
PetsMart Pet Trainer
My Kids, My Students, My Life:
http://hometown.aol.com/dfrntdrums/myhomepage/index.html Last updated June 27 at 10:00 a.m.
She's my most highly trained, but she needs proofing.

What kind of proofing?
A couple of months ago, I knew she wouldn't pass the test. Now I think she has a really good chance of passing. She's come a long way in her behavior at the store.

No offense Leah, but the CGC test is basically just a good manners test. It's not that complicated or fancy, why do you think Madigan cannot pass the test?
The other two are in line. MacKenzie is next. She responds well at home now, but would benefit from the distractions of a class environment.

You really need the experience of training all of your dogs. They will all be different. You don't put them in a line to train, you should be training all of them now; take turns taking them to the store and to other places as they progress in their training.
You've been working with Madigan now for a long time and you still don't think she can pass the CGC? The majority of my students who take the CGC pass, and they are students!
I don't understand you Leah, I really don't. You seem to want it all, now, without any experience required. A trainer should AT LEAST be able to CGC his/her dog. And a trainer should hav experience training more than one of her own dogs before she starts her own training business...
Dogstar716
Come see Gunnars Life: http://hometown.aol.com/dogstar716/index.html
She's my most highly trained, but she needs proofing.

What kind of proofing?

In a distracting environment where the distractions are controllable. At work, I often have to take my attention off of her to help a customer. She may then break a stay. Or jump on somebody and get reinforced for it.

Those are her two weak spots.
No offense Leah, but the CGC test is basically just a good manners test. It's not that complicated or fancy, why do you think Madigan cannot pass the test?

Mostly the separation part. She used to act out when I left her alone, unless she was in her crate. If I left her with a cashier to run and get some coffee, she'd whine and worry.
But the last time she came to work with me, she stayed in the training area by herself while I helped customers many times throughout the day. She stayed calm, though she was focused on watching for me.
You really need the experience of training all of your dogs. They will all be different. You don't put them ... of them now; take turns taking them to the store and to other places as they progress in their training.

I did that at first, but I can't bring them all the time. I have to pick a slow day, or they'll end up crated all day long. The "turns" were taking too long to come around (i.e., every 3 weeks).
Since I decided to concentrate on Madigan, she's come a long way.

By the time I open my own training center, I intend to have all 3 trained up to be valuable assistants and demo dogs.
PetsMart Pet Trainer
My Kids, My Students, My Life:
http://hometown.aol.com/dfrntdrums/myhomepage/index.html Last updated June 27 at 10:00 a.m.
I agree. I've CGC'd quite a few of my dogs and they never had any specialized training (like - Oh look! They're having a CGC at the puppy match this weekend - this one doesn't have a certificate - kind of thing)
A trainer should AT LEAST be able to CGC his/her dog.

I don't even see this as a "minimum". This, following the spirit of the threads, is like my going to get a job as a chef because I can cook a mean pot of spaghetti for my family. A CGC is something that anyone* owning a dog should be able to do, with comparative ease. It's certainly *not*, IMO, a "goal" for someone that's professed to *be a professional trainer for the better part of a year now.
Robin
I agree. I've CGC'd quite a few of my dogs and they never had any specialized training (like - Oh look! They're having a CGC at the puppy match this weekend - this one doesn't have a certificate - kind of thing)

A CGC is something that anyone owning a dog
should be able to do, with comparative ease. It's certainly not*, IMO, a "goal" for someone that's professed to *be a professional trainer for the better part of a year now.

No kidding. I've put CGCs on dogs within a month of adopting them from the shelter, Franklin got his on his 1st birthday (happened to be the club summer meeting and picnic, so it was convenient), and I've even "dropped in" and put CGCs on dogs that aren't even MINE!
Most of those were the "old" CGC test, which seemed a little more formal about some things.
As far as titles go, I don't particularly enjoy the obedience ring, and fully admit that. I like using those same skills in every day life. I would like to try Rally-O though I think - just haven't found the time right now. OTOH, flyball has become an addictive passion and it's a good thing I have a large home office - the ribbons, certificates and trophies are taking over! ;-D

While Franklin wasn't purposely BRED for flyball, he sure was chosen as a very likely potentially awesome flyball dog. He's not letting me down.

Janet Boss
Best Friends Dog Obedience
"Nice Manners for the Family Pet"
Voted "Best of Baltimore 2001" - Baltimore Magazine www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com
Me either. One of the main reasons I've never followed the 'trainer' path. I figure that no one with any sense would pick a trainer without credentials, and I have little interest in obtaining them. I wouldn't. My own dogs are trained, and when I want a class, I go to a friend of mine that runs obedience classes.
She has RRs that are multiple titled in obedience and agility.

IMO, that's proof enough for anyone that she's a talented trainer

Robin
She has RRs that are multiple titled in obedience and agility. IMO, that's proof enough for anyone that she's a talented trainer Robin

No kidding! A breed I admire greatly, but will probably never own.

As far as obedience competition, I need to get Franklin in the ring but honestly just don't like it all that much and have been putting it off. He does have some nice little first place ribbons from fun matches (as did my last FCR(rescue)).
I put a CD on my Golden many years ago, but hate all that waiting around for my turn, waiting for stays, waiting for scores. Unless it's a show I'm enjoying a bunch otherwise. The "interactive" events are much more appealing to me. One day, I'll even find the time for more serious field work - Franklin loves it, I don't mind wet and cold and such to see him enjoy himself so much, and my club has great training available. although it's about an hour away. I need to get my foot fixed before I go stomping around in fields. My regular classes don't wrap up until late November, so I'm trying to plan time off in January/February.
Thank goodness for my business partner. Accomodating ~500 people and dogs a year isn't simple sometimes.
Janet Boss
Best Friends Dog Obedience
"Nice Manners for the Family Pet"
Voted "Best of Baltimore 2001" - Baltimore Magazine www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com
No kidding. I've put CGCs on dogs within a month of adopting them from the shelter, Franklin got his on his 1st birthday (happened to be the club summer meeting and picnic, so it was convenient), and I've even "dropped in" and put CGCs on dogs that aren't even MINE!
I got Solo in September, spent a month and a half learning to cope with him enough to get up the guts to put him in an obedience class, enrolled in a class oriented toward the CGC, and he passed the test on December 19, my birthday. And it did take a good deal of work to get him ready for the test, but most of that was in the realm of behavior mod and not basic training.

Melanie Lee Chang > Form ever follows function. Departments of Anthropology and Biology >
University of Pennsylvania > Louis Sullivan (Email Removed) >
Which he primarily got just by living with you and being your dog! Not drilling, but living every day with confidence building, structure, etc. Surely if you can accomplish this with a dog with some issues, Leah can do this with a dog she's had from young puppyhood!
Janet Boss
Best Friends Dog Obedience
"Nice Manners for the Family Pet"
Voted "Best of Baltimore 2001" - Baltimore Magazine www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com
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