So, im not planning on breeding my sun and just want one bird. Is a male or female better? As in temperments or when they age. I know a lot of people that dont get them DNA sexed have a hard time telling the difference but i have the option of choosing what sex I want so naturally, i was just curious. Thanks guys. Youve been a wonderful help D
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So, im not planning on breeding my sun and just want one bird. Is a male or female better? As ... of choosing what sex I want so naturally, i was just curious. Thanks guys. Youve been a wonderful help Emotion: big smile

In our experience male conures have been more predictable than females, but both sexes have their quirks. Females have the equivalent of a lion's "throw off the male" instinct, where you might be cuddling with one, and with no warning at all she'll climb up and try and take a piece of your eye out. I almost lost an eye to one of these throw-offs, by a half-inch. But I got by with just a nasty gash under one eyebrow. We've had this happen with not one but three female suns, while none of our males have ever displayed this kind of behavior. The upside is, females are generally quieter and less demanding than males.
Some males on the other hand, if you place them on any kind of a perch that's higher than you are, become very aggressive. It's a power thing with them in the wild, top bird gets the highest perch. Not all of our male suns do this, and we've never seen it happen with a female.
So, im not planning on breeding my sun and just want one bird. Is a male or female better? As ... of choosing what sex I want so naturally, i was just curious. Thanks guys. You've been a wonderful help Emotion: big smile

My observation is that neither sex nor species is very important in determining whether a particular parrot will be a good companion. Far more important is how you and the particular bird interact. At least for the birds I have the way they relate to you at your first meeting is the best indicator of how they'll relate in the future. I would recommend choosing a bird more on how it acts toward you when you meet over any other criteria. A timid bird or an agressive bird is more likely to remain that way. Trust will improve with time but it has to get a start.
So, im not planning on breeding my sun and just ... just curious. Thanks guys. You've been a wonderful help Emotion: big smile

My observation is that neither sex nor species is very important in determining whether a particular parrot will be a ... bird is more likely to remain that way. Trust will improve with time but it has to get a start.

This may be true, but I didn't see my bird before I bought her. The only person in the United States who was willing to give a one year health guarantee was Marc Marrone of Parrots of the World. His shop is on Long Island.
I had no idea if Mika was male or female, but I had her DNA sexed and she turned out female.
The main thing, in my opinion, is how you relate to the bird. Mika was flown to me on a jet, under a seat in the passenger cabin, her ticket was full priced and when she got here all I could see was her little eyeball looking out of the carrier. She was already "step up" familiar. They called her "Birdy" so when I said that to her it was something she recognized and it put he at ease.
This may have nothing to do with male or female, but I am always partial to female pets, so was pleased she was a girl.
So, im not planning on breeding my sun and just want one bird. Is a male or female better? As ... of choosing what sex I want so naturally, i was just curious. Thanks guys. Youve been a wonderful help Emotion: big smile

From what I have experienced, it does not matter. What does matter is how the bird was raised, and how the owner treats it. Many of the Parrots you have no way of knowing unless you get it checked. Many people never do know, and the birds do fine.

"Everything in excess! To enjoy the flavor of life, take big bites. Moderation is for monks."
(Lazarus Long)
From what I have experienced, it does not matter. What does matter is how the bird was raised, and how ... fine. "Everything in excess! To enjoy the flavor of life, take big bites. Moderation is for monks." (Lazarus Long)

When I bought my first bird, Cricket, I labeled the bird a male in my mind and called it him. About two years later I had it sexed and Cricket is a hen. It was really weird to wrap my brain around my little male now being a hen. I found that I began speaking to her in a different voice and generally treating her more like my "little princess" and less like "my little buddy".
I don't recall whether her behavior changed in my change toward her but I agree with you, Alex. I think sex is less important than how the bird is treated.
I do think species matters. In my experience, a Severe is a less tolerant bird than a Grey or Cockatoo. This observation is based on more than one of those three species. By the way, babies don't count. If birds all retained their baby attitude, everyone would want one.

Sincerely,
Joanne
If it's right for you, then it's right, . . . . . for you!!!

http://www.jobird.com
.. By the way, babies don't count. If birds all retained their baby attitude, everyone would want one.

That is an important point Joanne made. With parrots, there can be a dramatic change from the juvenile stage to sexual maturity. It seems to me that I see a lot of parrots for sale when they reach the age of two.

Dave
www.davebbq.com
.. By the way, babies don't count. If birds all retained their baby attitude, everyone would want one.

That is an important point Joanne made. With parrots, there can be a dramatic change from the juvenile stage to sexual maturity. It seems to me that I see a lot of parrots for sale when they reach the age of two. Dave www.davebbq.com

BIG TIME!!
At times I miss Charlie's days as a Juvenile Macaw. He was a lot like a Puppy or Kitten, constantly wanting to play. There is a noticeable difference when they mature, and they start really testing the limits of what they can get away with. They are a lot of fun as they get older and learn though. It makes it a constant challenge to stay ahead of them . I well remember when he was a baby trying to encourage him to learn to climb down from his cage on his own, instead of wanting someone to pick him up. Had to use ladders. Then of course when he learned to do it on his own, I often learned to wish he had never learned when I would find him destroying something.
He even learned to open the supposedly "escape proof" doors on his Kings Cage. For a while there when I would come home and find him out I was sure wife had forgotten to lock him up, till I caught him doing it one day. There is also of course a BIG difference in the care needed for different species of birds. The Larger Parrots tend to need a lot more human care than the smaller ones. This is the only thing that keeps me from getting another bird. I can't go anywhere there are Parrots, without seriously thinking of another. I would love a Grey, or another Macaw, but I keep telling myself it would be a mistake. Keeping up with the ones we have is a handful.
"Everything in excess! To enjoy the flavor of life, take big bites. Moderation is for monks."
(Lazarus Long)
BIG TIME!! At times I miss Charlie's days as a Juvenile Macaw. He was a lot like a Puppy or ... but I keep telling myself it would be a mistake. Keeping up with the ones we have is a handful.

I'm on a whole Cockatoo kick now. I bought the mini macaw because I figured the mini poops would be manageable. At this stage of the game, I'm not sure how Mika would react if I brought another bird in. She literally attacks dogs and other people. If we have company and she is on her gym, if someone goes to touch or hug me she swoops over and attacks. We don't entertain that often, and she is very protective of us.
I think she's going through a change now, at four. I don't know if she is sexually mature, but she is starting to need me less and less. The baby in her was so gentle. Now, her hooks are like talons and her beak (which I call her tooth to be cute) is needle sharp.

How old does a parrot have to be (average) before you'd be fairly certain they won't be talking any more than they are? Do they talk better as they get older? She says stuff, but not in that parrot way, it sounds like bird tweeting more than words, but I know what she's saying.
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