Hi, I had just adopted a Maltese from a foster home.Before he entered to the foster home, he was in a shelter for few weeks. He was a stray dog when being found. The animal shelter guessed him around a year old. The vet guessed he is around 9 months. Anyway, since he was a stray dog and don't have much information regarding his past/bad experience.
The problem is that he is very aggressive even for his small size (7lbs). He is aggressive to strangers and especially to small kids. When a person passing in front of him, he barks and eager to jump and attacks. Even the first time I meet him, he almost bite me. After staying with him for few days and give him a lot of love and cares, he is very attached to me and my wife. He trusts us and will turn his abdomen for us to scratch.

However, his bad habit still exists. Even he listens to my commands like stay and sit, he won't stop to attack other people. I know it takes time to train him. I am going to bring him to some training class. Before I do that, I just want someone can point me to the right direction and give me some advise on it. Thanks in advance for any help.
Brian
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Hi, I had just adopted a Maltese from a foster home.Before he entered to the foster home, he was in ... can point me to the right direction and give me some advise on it. Thanks in advance for any help.

I had a Maltese with almost exactly these problems. It sounds like fear aggression, at least it was with my Toby. In Toby's case we ended up medicating him (we took him to a behavioral specialist, who determined that at least part of his problem was physical) he started on Prozac and ended up on Paxil. But we still always had to be careful not to let him be in situations where he might try to attack a person or another dog.
At home, he was incredibly sweet and affectionate, even (eventually) with guests in the house. It wasn't until he had to leave the apartment that we had problems.
You should probably try to find someone who specializes in behavioral issues to help you deal with this. At the very least they can evaluate him and determine how hard it is going to be to deal with this.

Good luck!

boss, sometimes i think > kevin michael vail that our friend mehitabel > (Email Removed) is a trifle too gay >
archy > wotthehell wotthehell
Hi Kevin,
Thanks for your information. Do you know how much it usually cost to see a specialist for his case?
Our Charlie was a stray dog before, may be that is reason his owner left him in the street. Do you raise Toby as a puppy? If your Toby has similar problem, which means Charlie's problem doesn't necessary caused by his past bad experience as stray dog? Thanks again.
Brian
Hi Kevin, Thanks for your information. Do you know how much it usually cost to see a specialist for his ... Toby has similar problem, which means Charlie's problem doesn't necessary caused by hispast bad experience as stray dog? Thanks again.

Hi Brian,
My very dearest, dog-training friend has a maltese, who has similar issues to Kevin's Toby and who had to be medicated for a short period due to fear and aggression. With care and positive exposure to new people and things the dog has improved hugely. From what I can ascertain is that maltese are extremely sensitive to frightening things - one bad experience is enough to really change their behavior. My friends dog has been with her since he was8 weeks old, and we think most of his fearful behavior (which mostly is inresponse to men) came from some bad experiences (yelling? throwing things?) from her ex-boyfriend during a depressive period while the dog was a puppy. I met the dog when he was nine months old and he wouldnt' come near me. I was assisting in teaching a puppy agility class and was working with the tunnel. When it was Batmans' turn, and his mom handed me the leash he did everything in his power to get away from me - running to the end of the leash in every direction.

I couldn't touch him at all - he wouldnt' bite me but he was terrified. Three and a half years later, Batty happily sits on my lap. Some suggestions - make sure all interactions with your dog are CONTROLLED - don't allow people to run up to him and scare him. Have visitors drop treats as they come in the house. Have them ignore the dog entirely. Manage the behavior - keep him on a leash when guests come, just in case. And most of all DO NOT CODDLE THE DOG.

I know batty's fearful behavior was partially created by my friend scooping him up every time he got scared. She knows it too.
Hm... I may make a mistake since I pat him when he is barking. It seems like I can claim him down a bit. Should I just ignore him and hold the leash when he barks. Thanks.
Brian
Thanks for your information. Do you know how much it usually cost to see a specialist for his case?

I live in Washington, DC, where costs are much higher than elsewhere... the initial consultation with the behaviorist was about three hundred dollars, but surely it's less in most of the rest of the country.
Our Charlie was a stray dog before, may be that is reason his owner left him in the street. Do ... has similar problem, which means Charlie's problem doesn't necessary caused by his past bad experience as stray dog? Thanks again.

We got Toby when he was about 11 months old. We know he had been neglected by his first owner, though no mention was made of abuse... however, something bad happened to him at some point, just as Beth's friend's Maltese. We also think he was taken back to the shelter more than once. When he first came to live with us, he didn't seem to want to engage with us...anthropomorphizing, we see it as he didn't think he was going to stay here either, so why bother? However, once he realized he was here for good, he got extremely affectionate when it was just people he knew.
And, since you weren't here last year, I have to tell you that Toby died just about a year ago of lung cancer. He was only four. What he would have been like after another five years of living with us we'll never know. I like to think he would have become a lot mellower even with strangers.

Kevin Michael Vail > a billion stars go spinning through the night, (Email Removed) > blazing high above your head. . . . . . . . . . > But in you is the presence that . . . . . . . . > will be, when all the stars are dead. . . . . . . . . . > (Rainer Maria Rilke)
It seems that s/h/it refuses to stop, so keep killfiling, and st00pid will give up and go away.

yeah. you come back in 5-6 years and let us know how that worked out for ya'!

shelly (perfectly foul wench) and elliott and harriet http://home.bluemarble.net/~scouvrette
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