hey all, i have been lurking in here for a while, and have been impressed with the information i have recieved. have been doing a bit of research on getting my wife a new bird,,,she has had a couple of budgies over the years and has been talking that she'd like to get another bird, as the last one died about a year and a half ago. i have a friend who's father breeds birds and has a wide variety. anyway i think i have narrowed it down to getting her a marooned bellied conure, i think she would love a jenday as would i ,because of the colours but i think it would be way to much noise as i am a shift worker and from what i have read they are VERY noisy, so any info that anyone can give me on the maroon belly would be very much appreciated, or stories to entertain us all would be great.

thanks alot and looking forward to hearing from you all. fred in ontario, canada
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hey all, i have been lurking in here for a while, and have been impressed with the information i have ... entertain us all would be great. thanks alot and looking forward to hearing from you all. fred in ontario, canada

I love them. I have 2 which I had reared and they talk a lot.They sau "kissy kissy kissy" and make kissing npoises, and also "hello, and hello little parrots". They are agile, active, affectionate little birds.I love them.
I have a Green Cheek, very similar. She's great. They tend to be nippy, but it's not an issue. So, if the Maroon Bellies are the same way (don't know if they are or not), don't let it get you down. It's just a part of who they are. Yoshi is VERY quiet, can talk, but doesn't and is very easy going w/her toys. Most people recommend a smaller food, cockatiel size, but Yoshi prefers larger pieces (even though she is a small Green Cheek), so be prepared to offer different sizes (and of course types) so that the bird can let you know what they like better. There is write up in Bird Talk (June issue) about Maroon Bellies, you may want to take a peek at it.

Bobbie and the flock (ID)
Yoshi...cinnamon green cheek conure
Eeyore...cinnamon cockatiel
Moe...pacific parrotlet
RitzQuaker...blue quaker
Leela...torquoise indian ringneck
Binkly...lesser sulpher crested cockatoo
Elliot, Jake, Arnold and Arthur...budiges
Shake'NBake...senegal
And the herd of dogs, frogs, bunny, goat and rats.
hey all, i have been lurking in here for a while, and have been impressed with the information i have ... entertain us all would be great. thanks alot and looking forward to hearing from you all. fred in ontario, canada

I have a black-capped conure, same genus, different species. He's very sweet with me. He's usually good with women, and sometimes good with men. Bob Wheeler remembers him as the demon bird he took care of during my internship. These guys are very tenacious. If they want something they go after it, and go after it, and go after it... Whether it's a treat, a cuddle, a toy...or someone to bite! It's usually not a big issue with them, but they can develop an evil streak. Mostly what they will do is try to cuddle with you. Wes rubs his head against my glasses so hard that he often knocks them off! These guys are great for the icecream cone hold, Wes prefers it to simply perching on my hand.Like any parrot they have their pluses and minuses. They are one of the quieter conures, but that isn't the same as being quiet. They will make high-pitched noises, squeaks and chirps that can peirce the eardrums. They simply don't vocalize like that as often as a Jenday or Sun Conure. They are not very good talkers. Wesley knows "Twinkle Bird" (his previous name from his first owners), "Step up" (I haven't heard him say that in a while, though), and "Pikbo", short for Pikabo (guess what his favorite game is).

They can get nippy, and once they develop a biting problem it is difficult to get them to stop, so it is very important to nip that behavior in the bud. (In fact, I once saw a fallow green cheecked conure bite off a chunk of skin from my former manager's finger and EAT IT! Man-eating bird, lol.), but generally this isn't more of a problem then for most other parrots.

Did I mention Wesley likes to cuddle? He is also a bit of a peeping tom! He likes to crawl inside women's shirts, or just stare down the neck at my boobies. He's especailly bad with my sister, whenever she has leave he won't leave her shirt unless she evicts him. Silly goose.

Gloria
They can get nippy, and once they develop a biting problem it is difficult to get them to stop, so it is very important to nip that behavior in the bud.

How?
They can get nippy, and once they develop a biting ... is very important to nip that behavior in the bud.

How?

Dr Harry would probably tell you to immediately put them down (or in their cage) and ignore them, every time they bite. Pick them up and resume playing after 15 minutes. That's my guess.
How?

Dr Harry would probably tell you to immediately put them down (or in their cage) and ignore them, every time they bite. Pick them up and resume playing after 15 minutes. That's my guess.[/nq]Varies from bird to bird and situation to situation. Right now Wes is being something of an ass in the morning when I feed him. He's very crabby until he gets breakfast, and then he's fine once he's had a chance to eat. I know it can't be hunger because he always has some food left over in his dish, but it may be that he's done with that dish, and wants a fresh one, or something. If I were to close the cage door he would win...and probably learn to bite to get food (because naughty or not he would need to be fed) or to stay in the cage (actually, he prefers the cockatiel's cage for day-time, and his own for night-time.

Not that I blame him, they have a huge cage). So I towel that little sucker and put him on the floor while I feed him. That derails his aggressive behavior and helps to keep him from generalizing it to other times of the day. Once he's had breakfast he's fine.
Funny thing his, his original owners gave him up for being aggressive to their other birds, but in the three years I've had him he hasn't done anything to the 'tiels. During the day the fids have free range of the bird room, and it isn't unusual to see the kids having their mid-day siesta with Wes smack dab in the middle of my four-bird flock of cockatiels. Maybe it's because they're all flighted? It's the turquosine parakeet who seems to being having a hard time fitting in, although I think she's intimidated by all the yellow-and-gray birds.
Gloria
He
They can get nippy, and once they develop a biting ... is very important to nip that behavior in the bud.

How?

by buying a book on bird training and reading it.

'Guide to companion parrot behaviour'
'My parrot my friend'
'Guide to a well behaved parrot'
'Birds for dummies'
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