Hi, I'm new here.
In regards to whether or not to micro chip, I'd rather not put the bird through that unnecessary surgery unless it's unbanded. I breed zebra finches and I band all my birds. The band goes on when the bird is approximately a week old. This proves that the bird is not wild caught while the microchip proves nothing other than who had the chip installed by a vet.
Denise
Oops! I have egg on my face. I saw the dates backwards and didn't realize that I was answer a post from December. lol.

Denise
Hi, I'm new here. In regards to whether or not to micro chip, I'd rather not put the bird through ... bird is not wild caught while the microchip proves nothing other than who had the chip installedby a vet. Denise[/nq]I do not have my small birds chipped, but I did do it to the Macaw. He had a closed band, but there were (to me) a couple problems with that. One, the band made me nervous. He is very active, I was afraid he would mange to get the damn thing caught on something. Slim chance I know, but I did not want to keep it. Also I figure if someone was to steal the bird the first thing they would do is remove the band, and being armatures would likely hurt the bird trying to cut it off.

When we had him chipped, I had the Doctor cut off the band at the same time. The same Vet did one time reunite a B&G with it's owner because of the chip. The bird had gotten away, was found in a local park when it got too weak to fly. The people who caught it brought it in, she read the chip, found the owner and they were VERY happy to get their bird back.

"I don't know the key to success, but the key to failure is trying to please everyone."
Bill Cosby
My ABVP-certifed vet will not microchip birds under 85g, and i've heard others use a minimum threshold of 100g.
Re. chipping v closed-banding, i think the two are apples and oranges. Banding might prove, or help to prove, that a bird is a hand-fed domestic, but is practically useless for identifying a lost or stolen bird. The latter is what microchipping was designed for and where it excels.

Vincent J. Hrovat / Omnia quia sunt, lumina sunt.
Maybe in the States, it's practically useless to trace a band but in Canada, most of the bird clubs are either affiliated or get their bands through the Avicultural Advancement Council of Canada (http://www.aacc.ca ) and they are traceable but yes, my main reason for banding is because we've had enough scares from activists who would rather see a bird set loose in the middle of winter and die rather than live a nice comfortable life with a human who cares about it.
5 years ago, this December, Toronto councillors nearly succeeded inpassing an animal bylaw without any citizens knowing about it. Just by luck, a local newspaper printed a one inch article and we pounced on it as soon as we found out about it. We were so successful about removing anything about birds, that they dubbed the bylaw the cat bylaw because they were the ones who still had problems with it. They were ready to ban even the budgies that little old ladies depended on for companionship.
99% of my birds are banded. Those that are not banded are that way because I was given them that way.
If I'm afraid my birds will catch their bands on something, I just make sure I take anything that looks dangerous away. I make sure my birds are clipped so they cannot fly anywhere where they can get their bands caught and I can keep a very close eye on them.
Thanks for explaining the difference between US and Canada banding.
Maybe in the States, it's practically useless to trace a band but in Canada, most of the bird clubs are ... they are traceable but yes, my main reason for banding is because we've had enough scares from activists who would

Vincent J. Hrovat / Omnia quia sunt, lumina sunt.
Maybe in the States, it's practically useless to trace a band but in Canada, most of the bird clubs are either affiliated or get their bands through the Avicultural Advancement Council of Canada (http://www.aacc.ca ) and they are traceable

Traceable to who?

Steve
My ABVP-certifed vet will not microchip birds under 85g, and i've heardothers use a minimum threshold of 100g. Re. chipping ... practically useless for identifying a lost or stolen bird. The latter iswhat microchipping was designed for and where it excels.

Also the feet of birds are like a fingerprint, one of a kind, take a picture, for proof positve.