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Off on a tangent, but this one appears to be coming up more and more frequently. Has anyone here had ... 'Couldn't hurt to try'. If the problem is so common and the fix so simple, why don't the vets know?

I'm not answering the question about the vet. I can tell you that Cubbe seems to get the urka-gurkas when she has an empty stomach and when she's gotten too much in the way of fatty table scraps. That doesn't mean that she always gets the slight spitting up then, not by a long shot, but when we've tried to put together the variables, those are the two that seem to do it. Sort of. Sometimes she gets them when we can't figure out a cause, and sometimes she'll go ages without that late snack and never have a problem.
Lia
Off on a tangent, but this one appears to be coming up more and more frequently. Has anyone here had vets recommend a late night snack for dogs with empty tummy Urka-Gurkas?

Gen's aunt and uncle have had this recommended by their vet for when their dogs urka-gurka in the middle of the night. I think that they give 1/2 a dog biscuit just before bedtime to combat this.

Marcel and Moogli
as to whether or not her advice was helpful, i suggest that people do some serious research before following it.

I think anyone who takes advice on a newsgroup about their beloved dogs and their health and medication or
even feeding, should have a stuffed animal rather then a dog. This is not the place to take advice of someone you don't know anything about. Not when we are
talking about a life. A beloved life at that.
And personally I never have, and I don't believe
Diana thought for one minute that a person
would take her advice without consulting their
Vet.
I can't for one minute fathom anyone
with one ounce of a brain, ever doing more than obtaining information to ask their professional Vet, etc.
Gwen
Perfecto! Marvelously said.
Gwen
I think anyone who takes advice on a newsgroup about their beloved dogs and their health and medication or even feeding, should have a stuffed animal rather then a dog. This is not the place to take advice of someone you don't know anything about.

I think that in many cases we do know something about each other, and we know who's reliable, who's unreliable, and who's somewhere in the middle. I've definitely learned a lot from some of the posters here. I wouldn't think of medicating my dogs without checking with my vet first, but at the same time I wouldn't tell anybody else to medicate their dog without checking with their vet first, too. The two go together, it seems to me.

Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

I was shrill before shrill was cool.
Right. Unfortunately, sedating a dog is not exactly how one goes about dealing with SA.

It depends. In some cases, anti-anxiety meds could be very helpful in the treatment.
Here's what she said " for dogs, without any side effects or chemical toxicity, you can calm your dog." It certainly sounded to me like she's saying that it is perfectly safe for use in dogs.

Standing alone, yes. But in context, she also said she had searched to see if there were any contraindications, and couldn't find any.
Fact is that there are no studies on its effect in dogs, so this would be a pretty big stretch. ... we do, and that pharmaceuticals that are pretty safe for use in humans can be fatal to dogs and cats.

Yep. Absolutely. As I mentioned in a previous post, when it comes to herbal use, just about all a person has to go on to decide whether or not to take the risk are anecdotes. That's why I consider posts like Diana's so valuable. I now know at least that valerian root appears to have had the same sedative and calming effect on a dog as on humans, and the dog didn't get ill or die. That doesn't tell me much, but it tells me more than I knew before.

If Gwen reports back what the holistic vet had to say about valerian root use on dogs, I'll know even more.
I just think the attitude of "don't say it unless you can back it up 100%" is often taken to extremes. To the point of censorship, in some cases.

If you're publishing a magazine article on a subject, then you absolutely must be able to back up everything you say. But just to start a discussion in a newsgroup? I think not.
I think that I would have been more comfortable with what Diana posted if she had at least added that ... entirely 'Rah, Rah, look at this wonderful, non-toxic, completely safe thing to use', when the picture is hardly that clear.

I perceived the post as cautiously optimistic. But that's one of the problem with trying to converse by the written word alone. It's often easy to misunderstand intentions.
I don't see anything wrong with posts pointing that out.

Oh, me neither! IMHO, the purpose of a discussion group is to turn over rocks and shine lights into all aspects of the subjects being discussed.

There's another aspect of this discussion that's bothering me, and it's come up several times in other threads. This is a public forum, unmoderated, the only real restriction being that, in general, the subject discussed should have something to do with dogs.
If I were to post something like, "I have been giving Murphy devil's claw for her arthritis, and it seems to be working well," I refuse to be responsible for what a reader does with that information. I'm sure there are some people who would take one statement from a newsgroup and bet the farm on it, but I'm also sure that most people would want to find out more before taking action.

If we were to censor our statements to only those that couldn't be misunderstood or misinterpreted, or scientifically proven, we wouldn't have anything to say.
People are responsible for their own actions. I never did buy the, "he did it because he saw it on TV, so we're going to sue" thing.

Canine Action Dog Trainer
http://www.canineaction.com
My Kids, My Students, My Life:
http://hometown.aol.com/dfrntdrums/myhomepage/index.html
I don't mind being picked up for some errors in my posting, I appreciate I could have worded it a ... this herbal treatment has been in keeping a dog that really would be bouncing off the walls, calm and happy.

I know that you follow rpd.health. I take medical topics very seriously (for reasons many here know) and rarely banter or go off-topic there.
So, when it comes to anything that can be construed as medical advice, I take a very conservative approach and make it exceedingly clear that it's my opinion only and that a veterinarian should always be consulted.
While this is a discussion group, some of us have reasons for being anal when it comes to specific subjects especially those medical and it's unfortunate that this thread has devolved into taking shelly's valid concerns so lightly.
The post was intended as I titled it, 'might be useful for some'.

I understand your intention, and I'm glad that it worked for Cindy.

Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
I have never seen a holistic vet (although I have read about them in here), so don't take this question as snarky, but rather seriously. When holistic vets recommend a herbal mixture, what do they base their recommendations on??

The only holistic vet to which I've taken a dog had a background in allopathy. She balanced her TCM (traditional Chinese medication) prescriptions, vitamins, minerals, and diet with drugs that the dog was currently on.
In Rocky's case, she had no interest in pulling him off of his drugs, but in complementing them with vitamins, minerals, and other supplements which may have eventually helped reduce the effects (and dosage) of the original drugs.
She took it all into account. What impressed me most was her understanding that I had absolutely no faith in homeopathy and worked around that.

Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
If the problem is so common and the fix so simple, why don't the vets know?

They don't read RPD?
All I know is that Murphy was miraculously cured of the Yellow Bile Syndrome by a light snack before dinner. This happened pre-rpd and the advice came from a vet.
Further to that, specks of bright blood in the yellow bile is OK. That diagnosis came after putting the stuff into a baggie and taking it down to Murphy's vet.

Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
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