I am looking at different mixed breeds – labs, shepherds, hounds, pointers, husky.
I have posted before about looking for a dog/breed that I can take in the woods and mountains for long runs and thank everyone for the great feedback.
My question has to do with whether or not it can be (relatively reliably) predicted which breed personality traits will be more dominant in a mixed pup. For example – take a lab/husky mix. Should I expect this dog to also be very independent like the husky, or very trainable like the lab? Or is there really no way to predict something like that?
Anyone have any experiences with mixed breeds I have named?
Thanks
My question has to do with whether or not it can be (relatively reliably) predicted which breed personality traits will ... like the husky, or very trainable like the lab? Or is there really no way to predict something like that?

There really isn't any reliable way to predict that. However, you can tell a bit from the dog's build. It's not that Labs don't have the energy to run for 20 miles straight, it's that they aren't built to take the work of it and will pull up lame or sore a lot quicker. So if you're, for example, looking at a Lab/Husky mix, if you find one that's very light boned (more like the husky), it will be able to do the work. BUT you also want a dog that can do this off-lead, which means you'll have to wait for your puppy to grow up to see how it deals.
Also, a puppy can't join you for at least a year or two on these runs, so you may be better off looking at adults.
~Emily
My question has to do with whether or not it can be (relatively reliably) predicted which breed personality traits will ... like the husky, or very trainable like the lab? Or is there really no way to predict something like that?

There is no real way to predict with mixed breed puppies, how they'll turn out. If the traits you are looking for are really important to you, I would suggest that you look at young adults, about 2 years of age. By then, pretty much what you see is what you get, and if you get one from a rescue that properly evaluates the dogs, you'll be able to see if they are temperamentally suited for making you a good companion.

Suja
I can't answer your question but wanted to suggest that you look into Dual-Purpose Labs being bred by breeders who are into the all-purpose dog. There is a large coalition of ethical breeders now breeding for Labs who are both beautiful to look at AND who have the very strong endurance/trainability/retrieving traits of the breed. Running and climbing are natural to the Lab and you may be able to find a good adult dual-purpose dog from an ethical breeder because the dog washed out of a field work or ended up with some trait that disqualified the dog from being bred.

Tara
My question has to do with whether or not it can be (relatively reliably) predicted which breed personality traits will ... like the husky, or very trainable like the lab? Or is there really no way to predict something like that?

Others have said that there's no predicting this, and I agree. My cocker spaniel/chow cross has a lot of the chow independence and also the cocker eagerness to please. When she was younger, it was quite funny, she would actually look more chowish at home and more cockerish when we were out and about. Now that she's full grown, she doesn't seem to "morph" as much, and she continues to be more independent than cockers and more friendly to strangers than chows. She has the chow fastidiousness, which made housebreaking a breeze.
I read up on both temperaments and liked what I knew of both of them, so I was somewhat prepared for whatever she turned into. But mostly I went with my gut feeling, Zoe spoke to me at the shelter, we just somehow connected more than I did with the other dogs/puppies there. Her case is a little different from most mixes, because she had two purebred parents, so what made up her "mix" was known.
I'd say knowing the personality traits of the breeds that make up the mix might be more useful for "ruling out" purposes than for "choosing" purposes. If you don't like independence, for instance, and the dog has a known independent breed in his/her background, then you might not want to pick that dog.
Unless s/he speaks to you. Emotion: smile
Catherine
& Zoe the cockerchow who today is speaking to the detritus on my deck. Yes I know I should clean it off.