Last night when I was removing my snake from the viv I noticed some mold growing on the wood hide. Can this be removed or should I throw it out & get another one? Thanks.
Robert
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You might be able to remove the mold with a stiff brush and water, or a stiff gin and tonic.
Mold suggests a higher than normal humidity level. A quick wipe with Clorox and water, and a day or two to dry in the sun.

later,
Snake Whisperer
Teach the Children
"Back to the Garden"
Last night when I was removing my snake from the viv I noticed some mold growing on the wood hide. Can this be removed or should I throw it out & get another one? Thanks.

As snake whisperer noted, mold is an indicator of your humidity levels being too high. Although the mold itself poses no health problems, the high humidity can lead to things such as scale rot and skin infections.

Find out the cause of the humidity problems (possibly air circulation).

In regards to the mold, clean as you would any other item (5% bleach/water solution) and allow to air dry for a couple of days.

~Wade
Find out the cause of the humidity problems (possibly air circulation).

I think the mold is from a fogger I had in there for a while. Made a hell of a mess splashing water on everything. The humidity stays around 70 if I completely cover the top of the viv, except for the end where the lamp is, with wet towels. Otherwise it gets pretty dry in there, around 50. Should I uncover the other end a bit, say 3" or so to help circulation?
Made a hell of a mess splashing water on everything.

You just provided the answer as to why you have mold...if the fogger was keeping an area (or areas) of the tank/vivarium wet, this will indeed lead to the growing/formation of mold.
As far as overall humidity levels, you are well within range; but if at all possible, it is also advisable to provide as much air-circulation as possible while maintaining the optimal humidity level for your animal.

~Wade
Last night when I was removing my snake from the viv I noticed some mold growing on the wood hide. Can this be removed or should I throw it out & get another one? Thanks. Robert

I've found scrubbing the hide and then baking it at 250F for an hour helps.

-cat
It's not so easy to provide good ventilation if you use a drawerlike setup for your young snakes. I use Boaphile and only in ONE drawer do I draw excess humidity and have been told one, to remove the water except say, every two days, two, never to remove the water from a milksnake, and three, to reduce the water in the snake's waterbowl to a minimal amount. I've opted for three. Maybe it helps. It's just that this snake loves to swim so much that he's made a constant wet mess of his substrate and I literally can't keep it dry. He needs a fulltime attendant. I stay ahead of it as best as I can as I know 'the dangers'.
My question. My friend Don, who has about 7000 snakes and mostly in drawer setups, does NOT use hides in any of them, as he has no lighting in the drawers and does not keep his setup in a glaring bright room and so he says the back of the drawer is quite enough security for the snake, let alone its digging into the substrate.

Opinions would be welcomed, as some of my '03's are getting to be a bit big for their sweaterdrawers, NOT shoeboxsized drawers, and although technically the size is fine, you know me, I worry. Getting rid of the hides would clear more floorspace, that's for sure.

Barbara
My question. My friend Don, who has about 7000 snakes and mostly in drawer setups, does NOT use hides ... the back of the drawer is quite enough security for the snake, let alone its digging into the substrate.

Barbara,
The majority of my Colubrid breeders are kept in sweaterbox setups without individual lighting, with heat tape running along the backs to create a "hot spot" towards the rear of all the sweaterboxes. (Kind of standard faire for many breeders).
The lighting provided is standard fluorescent for the entire room.

I have tried using hides and not using hides, and I personally have noticed that the snakes seem a bit calmer when a hide is provided; but other than that no adverse effects have been observed by not providing hides.

I prefer to use the hides as mine have a built-in reservoir to hold the water dish, reducing the incidences of water spillage to almost zero.

I am assuming your friends set-up is similar to what mine is, and yes, there is a natural dark-spot with this type of setup (between the shelves where the sweaterboxes are placed) allowing the snakes a somewhat secluded retreat.
~Wade
Opinions would be welcomed, as some of my '03's are getting to be a bit big for their sweaterdrawers, NOT ... is fine, you know me, I worry. Getting rid of the hides would clear more floorspace, that's for sure.

I'd say lose the hides. The drawers are fairly dark (unless yours are lit?) and the contact with the sides of the drawer should provide enough of a sense of security. Look at it this way: You can always try it for a few weeks, and if the snakes seem agro, you'll know it didn't work and can look for another option.
-Z
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