More dogs and cats go under the ... laser?
Operation option helps speed up recovery
By Elizabeth Putnam
Wausau Daily Herald
MARATHON - Lasers are replacing scalpels in a handful of pet hospitals in north central Wisconsin.
Hundreds of veterinary clinics nationwide, including County Center Animal Hospital in Marathon, Countryside Animal Hospital near Merrill and the Medford Animal Hospital, now are using lasers, the latest in veterinary surgery, because they cause less bleeding and minimal swelling and lead to a quick recovery for the family pet. Laser surgery also is more precise and reduces the risk of infection, said County Center veterinarian Thomas Bruning.
Deena Miller, 33, of Weston decided laser surgery was the best option for her cat, Murphy.
Miller had heard about laser surgery and its benefits, so she checked around for prices and decided it was the best route to take when Murphy was declawed.
"It's an option that gives you a peace of mind and a higher comfort level for your pet," Miller said. "If you are an animal lover, I would recommend it."
Murphy, a 3-month-old kitten, was playful and lively Thursday afternoon as he roamed his cage at County Center.
"You'd never guess that he was just declawed," Bruning said. "It's amazing how fast the recovery is."
The cost of laser surgery is slightly higher than standard scalpel surgery. The price for declawing using laser surgery costs about $40 more, Bruning said.
But it's worth it, said Brenda Arnold, a veterinary technician at County Center, whose 4-month-old kitten, Teegan, recently was declawed.

"They act like nothing happened after the surgery," Arnold said. "Cats are climbing their cages. It's remarkable."
The laser machine creates an invisible beam of light that vaporizes water and other soft tissue. Because the lasers are precise, only a thin layer of tissue is removed during surgery.
Laser surgery is ideal for dogs, cats, birds, reptiles, horses and other animals. It can be used for internal surgery, oral, ear, nose and throat surgery and for dermatology procedures.
County Center has offered laser surgery for about two years. Bruning said he can't imagine using a scalpel anymore.
"Eventually, it will become the standard of practice," he said.

For Murphy, who was expected to return home Friday, the experience was tolerable.
"I'm sure he's happy to come home," Miller said.
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Wrong newsgroup..
There is so much wrong with this last statement, I don't even know where to begin...

-L.
We were offered the option of laser surgery when our dog was neutered, at a cost of $90.00 more than the regular surgery. We did not get the laser surgery.
*Miller said. "If you are an animal lover, I would recommend it."* If Deena Millar was an animal lover she wouldn't have a cat declawed in the first place. It so sad to see stuff like this printed in papers , it undoes all the good work of vets and other people who are trying to educate cat owners and stop this practise.
Alison
*Miller said. "If you are an animal lover, I would recommend it."* If Deena Millar was an animal lover she wouldn't have a cat declawed in the first place.

i'm not a fan of declawing, but i think most people have it done out of ignorance, not malice(1). seems to me it would be more effective to explain why in graphic detail! you think declawing is heinous than to characterize them as people incapable of loving their pets.
(1) i think there are rare cases when declawing a cat may save its life. there are some things that are worse than death, but declawing, IMO, isn't one of them. for example, i had a hell of a time teaching my newest feral that, though claws do indeed beat skin, he doesn't need to demonstrate the principle at every opportunity. i've finally managed to drill some sense into his head, but it took a couple of years of being scratched all to hell. i can't say i'd blame another owner for being unwilling to put up with what i've put up with.
It so sad to see stuff like this printed in papers , it undoes all the good work of vets and other people who are trying to educate cat owners and stop this practise.

on that* i'll agree. i hate to see declawing treated so cavalierly. i don't want to see an outright ban on it, because i *do think there are rare cases where, as a last resort, it may save a cat's life. OTOH, it breaks my heart when people casually decide to have it done.

shelly (perfectly foul wench) and elliott and harriet http://home.bluemarble.net/~scouvrette
*Miller said. "If you are an animal lover, I would recommend it."* If Deena Millar was an animal lover she ... the good work of vets and other people who are trying to educate cat owners and stop this practise. Alison

That's your opinion. Many many people have cats declawed who adore their cats. What you term abuse, is only abuse in your eyes.
(1) i think there are rare cases when declawing a cat may save its life. there are some things that are worse than death, but declawing, IMO, isn't one of them.

I have one friend who has had one of her cats declawed. To put things in perspective, she's had about a dozen, and this is the only one who needed it. She ended up with someone else's problem cat, and the only way for human beings (and dogs) to safely live with the cat was to have her declawed.
When she told her vet about it, he said that he will only do it as an absolute last resort, and after having handled the cat for all of 5 minutes, agreed that this is one of the rare occasions when something that drastic was warranted. The cat went on to live a long and mostly healthy life.
Suja
"> > That's your opinion. Many many people have cats declawed who adoretheir cats. What you term abuse, is only abuse in your eyes.

It's not just *my* opinion. Maybe you should find out more about what is involved before you decide it's an abuse in my eyes only . Alison
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