Nixa, my female black lab dog has a few play mates in our neighborhood. She is 2 3/4 yrs old, spayed, very well behaved and in excellent shape and health.
One of her favorite playmates is a yellow lab mix who is about her age and also a spayed female in excellent shape and health. Often when they are playing
together Nixa will try and mount the other dog. While the other dog doesn't seem
to mind, I am wondering why Nixa does this. This is the only other dog I have seen
Nixa try to mount.
Any explanations of this behavior is appreciated.

Thanks,
Renee (Nixa's mom)
1 2
It's not what you think, although the sight of a female dog (or even a neutered male) mounting the back of another dog (of any gender) can be a tad shocking.
Mounting is not necessarily about sex when it comes to dogs. In most cases (neutered males and females) this behaviour is a dominance play, meant to force the other dog into submission. It is also just play, no deeper meaning to it at all. A more dominant dog may use this frequently to establish himself as higher in the heirarchy, but between dogs who have their pack position well-sorted, it is just a wrestling move, and a brief stint on the top will not elevate a lower-ranking dog to a higher position unless a challenge is clearly won.
Original Message

Sent: Saturday, December 04, 2004 9:26 PM
Subject: Re: Mounting other dog
It's not what you think, although the sight of a female dog (or even a neutered male) mounting the back ... most cases (neutered males and females) this behaviour is a dominance play, meant to force the other dog into submission

I tend to see most humping as a release of social frustration. I don't find the majority of it to be about dominance at all. But then I tend not to view dog behavior as a generalized power play..
Tara
Like the part that says it's play and that's it?
Like the part that says it's play and that's it? I didn't pull that out of my , I copied it from a dog training

Then it must be true.
Tara
Like the part that says it's play and that's it? I didn't pull that out of my , I copied it from a dog training website

That settles that!

Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

Republican Congress funded presidential yacht & Rock 'n Roll Hall of Fame Republican Congress cut funding for National Science Foundation
Like the part that says it's play and that's it? I didn't pull that out of my , I copied it from a dog training website

Hmm.Are you sure you haven't mixed up your orifices?

Terri

Larry La Prise, the man who wrote "The Hokey Pokey," died peacefully at age
93. The most traumatic part for his family was getting him into the coffin.

They put his left leg in. And then the trouble started.
I tend to see most humping as a release of social frustration. I don't find the majority of it to be about dominance at all.

Same here. The only time I consider mounting to be related to dominance is if there are other behaviors along with it, like holding a paw or head deliberately over the other dog's shoulders. And even then, it's not a big deal unless the other dog thinks it's a big deal.

Canine Action Dog Trainer
http://www.canineaction.com
It's A Dog's Life
http://hometown.aol.com/dfrntdrums/myhomepage/index.html Get Healthy, Build Your Immune System, Lose Weight http://www.re-vita.net/dfrntdrums
I tend to see most humping as a release of social frustration. I don't find the majority of it to be about dominance at all. But then I tend not to view dog behavior as a generalized power play.
Solo humps Fly regularly. It always happens when Fly is getting REALLY excited about a toy, dancing and squealing and spinning. I look at it as (a) Solo's way of trying to get in on the game somehow or (b) Solo's way of saying, "Hey lassie, tone it down now!" If it is a control thing, it tends to work because Fly's response to unsolicited humping is to lie down.

If there are any power struggles in my house, they would be (amusingly enough) between Skeeter and Solo. I have never seen any humping going on between these two, but this may be because Skeeter is too small to be humped, and because Skeeter knows that if he tried to hump Solo he'd pay.

Melanie Lee Chang > Form ever follows function. Departments of Anthropology and Biology >
University of Pennsylvania > Louis Sullivan (Email Removed) >
Show more