I have a large lab who I need to move about 800 miles by car/truck. She roams free on the ranch and is not used to either a leash or crate. I'm concerned about how best to move her, since I expect that she'll become quite agitated and probably won't cooperate with leash or crate. Any suggestions?
Thanks,
Greg
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I have a large lab who I need to move about 800 miles by car/truck. She roams free on the ... since I expect that she'll become quite agitated and probably won't cooperate with leash or crate. Any suggestions? Thanks, Greg

Can you tranquilize her? Could you spend some time working with her to acclimate her to leash/crate/travel? How soon must she make this move?
I have a large lab who I need to move about 800 miles by car/truck. She roams free on the ... move her, since I expect that she'll become quite agitated and probably won't cooperate with leash or crate. Any suggestions?[/nq]If you have time, spend some time getting her comfortable with a crate. Feed her in it. A good quality crate is the safest way to confine a dog when the dog is not used to either a tether or crate. Loose is a very bad idea - chances are you will lose the dog. If the vehicle is yours I would consider installing an eye bolt to the floor board so you have the option of using a short cable tether. There are a lot of viable options depending upon how agitated she actually is and what the vehicle set up is like.

For my dogs in the absence of a crate I like a plywood platform that goes across the seats and prevents the dog from falling down into the foot area. I make sure the tether is short so the dog cannot get tangled. A swivel snap on both ends helps as well. Have an extra cable and bolt cutters easily accessible just in case.
Do you have reason to believe she will be agitated other than her lack of experience? does she tend to become agitated about new things? That isn't normally a huge problem in labs, although I wouldn't go quite so far as to call it "rare".

Diane Blackman
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Your advice to gently acclimate her sounds promising and I'll give that a try. In the past when I tried to put a leash on her she behaved like a bucking bronco when she felt the restraint of a leash.

She is older and mor mellow now so I may have more success.

Years ago I tried placing food in a dog house to entice another retriever inside. He refused to enter the dog house for years until the day he finally passed away. Wish me better luck with this dog!

Any suggestions regarding a mild sedative for the trip and how to administer it?
Thank you for taking the time to write.
Greg Grosz
Years ago I tried placing food in a dog house to entice another retriever inside. He refused to enter the dog house for years until the day he finally passed away. Wish me better luck with this dog!

I had great success in encouraging entry by crawling into it myself. Even if that doesn't work right away put something of yours (e.g. a used t.shirt) in there to mark it as "home" and try again later.
Any suggestions regarding a mild sedative for the trip and how to administer it?

No but I have a strong caution. What you need is not a sedative but an anti-anxiety drug. Sedating the dog will often just scare the bejabbers out of it because it will still feel the fear, but be unable to respond. THis means that when the sedation wears off the dog may be in a bad state. A much better alternative is to use a drug that will reduce the feeling of fear and anxiety. Usually that means beginning a course of administration in advance. See your vet for the appropriate information.

Diane Blackman
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