My wife has ms and is bedridden most of the day. Recently we had to put our dog, who we had for 17 years, to sleep. He was a part of the family and my wife took it pretty hard because he was always by her side and kept her company during the day when I was at work and when the caregivers were gone. Although it takes a while to get over the loss of a pet, especially a pet who is a part of the family and who we've had so long, she misses the companionship during the day and is starting to think about getting another dog.

Since she's in a hospital bed during the day I know there are certain breeds of dogs that aren't ideal for this situation. Has anyone been in a similar situation and if you have, do you have any recomendations on breeds of dog, older dog vs. puppy, etc...
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My wife has ms and is bedridden most of the day. Recently we had to put our dog, who we ... similar situation and if you have, do you have any recomendations on breeds of dog, older dog vs. puppy, etc...[/nq]I would definitely go older dog vs. puppy. Puppies are higher energy, go through those chewing stages and need to be taken out to go potty more often. If the dog is to be a companion for your bedridden wife during the day while you are gone, which is how I am reading this, she wants one that will get into as little trouble as possible with as little physical exertion as possible. That means adult dog, not puppy. As for breed, I guess that depends on what your wife is looking for as well.

I wouldn't go with one of the really active breeds that will need tons of running and fetch time to be happy, but there are lots of different breeds that might work. Does she want a small lap dog or a bigger dog that would be beside the bed and easy to pet without being on the bed with her, for example? What breed was your last dog and what did you find to be the positives and negatives of that dog? More information would help in giving recommendations.

Paula
"Anyway, other people are weird, but sometimes they have candy, so it's best to try to get along with them." Joe Bay
I would definitely go older dog vs. puppy. Puppies are higher energy, go through those chewing stages and need to ... what did you find to be the positives and negatives of that dog? More information would help in giving recommendations.

A friend of mine who underwent surgery followed by chemotherapy was aided by her young female BC, who was basically self-taught. Zowie learned to retrieve anything that was dropped, would fetch remote controls, cell phones and blankets and would brace herself and let her owner push up to a stand against her. And I've never seen a BC that was more into eye contact than this dog.
She's not a typical BC, though. Most young border collies would have taken the opportunity to dismantle the house when confined with a bedridden handler.
Kathleen
In my experience getting a new dog beforen the greiving process is over with can be hard on disabled people who spend so much time with the new pet. It can be upsetting as the memories of the beloved animal that is now departed is there and sometimes the new dog can be seen a replacement and the sadness can be even greater.
A little Yorkie might be a nice choice as they are very clever and are wonderful lap and bed dogs.
I have a friend who has cancer who has one and that sweetie got her through the surgery and she is up and about lovin her dog who is always by her side.
Show Dog Bark
Paula (Email Removed) said in
I would definitely go older dog vs. puppy.

I agree, plus I know a few Italian Greyhound owners who'd say that an Iggie may be good in such a situation.

Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
She's not a typical BC, though. Most young border collies would have taken the opportunity to dismantle the house when confined with a bedridden handler.

Well, you know, the average home just is not efficiently planned for moving in sheep.

Paula
"Anyway, other people are weird, but sometimes they have candy, so it's best to try to get along with them." Joe Bay
She's not a typical BC, though. Most young border collies would have taken the opportunity to dismantle the house when confined with a bedridden handler.

Well, you know, the average home just is not efficiently planned for moving in sheep.

Yeah, but my friend had the foresight to hide her Mastercard and cancel her lines of credit at Home Depot and Lowes which minimized the damages.

Kathleen
Well, you know, the average home just is not efficiently planned for moving in sheep.

Yeah, but my friend had the foresight to hide her Mastercard and cancel her lines of credit at Home Depot and Lowes which minimized the damages.

That was lucky. The only thing more dangerous than a BC with time on its hands is a BC with a credit card in its hands.

Paula
"Anyway, other people are weird, but sometimes they have candy, so it's best to try to get along with them." Joe Bay
That was lucky. The only thing more dangerous than a BC with time on its hands is a BC with a credit card in its hands.

I knew there were a lot of special things about BCs, but I want to see a photo of these Border Collie hands.

Debbie the Dogged, who is wondering why someone is apparently trying to breed cats with opposable thumbs, when we all know cats are evil creatures who are just waiting to take over the world. das at spamcop dot net
"Poodles are space aliens who think they've disguised themselves as dogs." - Paghat the Ratgirl
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