I lost a baby corn born on 5/18/04 Very Sad. No reason I can figure out. Feed last night. Found dead today after he regurtutated food.

Sting
I lost a baby corn born on 5/18/04 Very Sad. No reason I can figure out. Feed last night. Found dead today after he regurtutated food.

Get the enclosure away from the rest of your herps and clean it. Don't use any of the implements in other cages. Hopefully whatever killed your corn isn't contagious.
I lost a baby corn born on 5/18/04 Very Sad. No reason I can figure out. Feed last night. Found dead today after he regurtutated food. Sting

You must have given him too much to handle. Don't mourn "him" too long though. Maybe your death will follow soon for your sins of incarceration.
I lost a baby corn born on 5/18/04 Very Sad. ... last night. Found dead today after he regurtutated food. Sting

You must have given him too much to handle. Don't mourn "him" too long though. Maybe your death will follow soon for your sins of incarceration.

This is why I stopped posting. I felt like I was doing that. ^

york
"Our herpetocultural education is based largely on piles of dead animals." (Rick Stafford, pers. comm, circa 1978)
Of course, this was said many years ago when information about herps was scarce or came from TFH books with smiling children on the cover. Back then, most publications were pet shop oriented and were to be avoided due to misinformation.
Cheers,
Kurt
Get the enclosure away from the rest of your herps and clean it. Don't use any of the implements in other cages. Hopefully whatever killed your corn isn't contagious.

First thing I did.
Anyone breeding corns? Any info on hatchling survival rate per clutch. I am just wondering if there is a time period from hatching with any defects that could lead to mortality that just did not show. Was seven months old. My husbandry meets with all the caresheets that I have seen. Very nerve racking when you think your providing everything and this happens.

Sting
Your post reminds me in a way of Meredith's (Z's) wonderful post, included in our group FAX maintained by Chris, about why snakes don't eat. Five excellent reasons having to do with prey and husbandry and a sixth reason, something to the effect of 'because they don't want to.' In nature the mortality rate on newborns would be wayyy higher. In captivity the mortality of youngsters is present also. I know your corn wasn't a baby but once you've eliminated disease, prey problems and your own husbandry, I paraphrase Meredith when I say that on rare occasions the answer is 'because'.

NOT very satisfying and all the above precautions should be taken, quarantine and examining your own methods, and I know this is a very unsatisfying answer because it leaves you nothing to correct, but on rare occasions, the answer is 'just because'.
I lost an albino Nelson's milksnake, a pearl of a beauty, at six months. No ostensible veterinary reason at all, no errors in husbandry, no change in feeding, nothing. Dead snake.

Sterilized all quarters, felt terrible, half because she was a favorite and half becuase there was no 'reason' to fix, but it happened, and sometimes all you can do is forgive yourself, write it off, and move on.
JMO.