What the actual difference between cruelty in nature and cruelty caused by humans?

I mean, there are really a lot of talks about how cruel people can be sometimes and that it has to be changed. But let's look at Mother Nature itself: there are always hunters and the hunted and the weakest are always dead, a lion can kill another lion's cubs (when a new leader comes), spiders eat each other, as well as mantises and many others, the world of meerkats is way too cruel too (unwanted newborns must be killed by their own mom, or both the mom and her cubs will be banished from the clan and die anyway)... I can go on but I guess these examples are enough.

So the question is, perhaps cruelty is the normal state of things and people will never change, just because our Mother Nature is built on cruelty itself? I'm talking about Corrida, slaughters, eating animals, fur industry, skinning animals alive in China, sport hunting, and so on. Are we really so different from nature?

Any opinions are welcome.
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I must disagree with you, I don't think it's cruel that stronger animals eat the weaker ones - They have to survive, and that's their way of living.

I don't think eating meat is something cruel either, I eat meat and I like it - But I also like animals and I wouldn't hurt them.

Cruelty would mean to me killing animals for fun or just make them suffer.

When it comes to survival, I don't consider it cruelty...

Emotion: smile
That does sound reasonable but I'm still not sure that in nature it is ALWAYS a matter of survival. Why is a lion so cruel to kill another leader's cubs? Why female spiders eat male ones after they've mated?

I don't mean you're wrong, CaRpE_dIeM, but I am jsut trying to understand the difference.
Mother nature isn't cruel. Animals kill each other to survive. They cannot be called cruel for acting on the instincts they were born with.

However humans are cruel because we kill animals not only for food (for survivial) but for our own entertainment (hunting), for clothes (I'm talking fur coats things we don't need) and for testing purposes. Emotion: sad
RaphaelThat does sound reasonable but I'm still not sure that in nature it is ALWAYS a matter of survival. Why is a lion so cruel to kill another leader's cubs? Why female spiders eat male ones after they've mated?

I don't mean you're wrong, CaRpE_dIeM, but I am jsut trying to understand the difference.

For the lion thing - the cubs will grow up and challenge them so essentially it is for survival, it's making sure no-one can kill them.

The spider thing... maybe it's the same? Perhaps when the spiders hatch (eugh) the male spider would kill them?

I think it still all boils down to survival in one way or another.
Maybe you are right. Sometimes this all looks so strange to me as if I couldn't find the difference. But the difference must be there, I believe.
I always think that no matter what animals do - Why they eat each other, why they kill each other...there is always a food chain.

I am not sure if you understand me, I don't really know how to call it but it's like: If there weren't, Lions, for example, the animals that lions eat would double their number, and that might not be beneficial for nature. Things wouldn't be balanced...at least that is what I learnt at school when I was little.

And I don't think it's cruel when we kill animals for food - It's a matter of survival, isn't it?

Emotion: smile
I think it would be enlightening to ask a theologian why God says "Thou shalt not kill" while all around us His creation perpetuates itself by doing just that. You can't turn over a rock without witnessing the daily slaughter. The problem is, we human think we're somehow different, superior, capable of becoming saints, while history shows that the only thing our species has accomplished in its long history is more efficient methods of wiping ourselves out.
Nature is programmed to be cruel they don't have a choice. Humans are programmed to have a choice, through the program is faulty they still have a choice and most are predatory in their choices,
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