Grief doesn't fade, does it? It recedes. I guess, in waves. Mac died a week ago today, and I'm supposed to be better. I'm not. On our morning walk, we crested a little hill where Mac and I used to watch the sun rise. I lost it. Pip and Gala simply pressed themselves close. God must like us, at least a little, to let us live with these companions. But why so soon do they go? Why so soon?
1 2 3 4 5 6
Grief doesn't fade, does it? It recedes. I guess, in waves. Mac died a week ago today, and I'm supposed ... least a little, to let us live with these companions. But why so soon do they go? Why so soon?

Grief does fade, over time. A week isn't a long time. We lost our Airedale at Easter. I still miss him. I can actually hear his footsteps on the kitchen floor some mornings, when I first wake up. Give yourself some more time. Grief does not have a time limit. It stops when you have done all the grieving that you need to do.
Why so soon? No answer to that but I agree it isn't long enough.

Donna
I don't know, but I can tell you what I tell myself. We're here to learn lessons of love, trust, loyalty, joy, compassion, faith. Dogs need less time learning these lessons that we humans do, so they're ready for the next level before we are.
Debbie
Grief doesn't fade, does it? It recedes. I guess, in waves. Mac died a week ago today, and I'm supposed to be better. I'm not.

Says who?? There is no timetable or formula for when you are supposed to be "over" something. It all takes its own damned time. Don't let anyone tell you that it shouldn't affect you. This is just me, and I am not a therapist, but here is how I look at it. Eventually, you will only remember the good times with Mac. Before that happens, you need to go through all of the sadness caused by his loss so that *it* doesn't come out in the future. The more you love and cherish someone, the longer it takes for the sadness to come out.
On our morning walk, we crested a little hill where Mac and I used to watch the sun rise. I ... least a little, to let us live with these companions. But why so soon do they go? Why so soon?

I remember reading somewhere about a little girl/boy?? that answered this question with this answer:
God puts on this earth to make others happy. Dogs (and cats, horses, goldfish, chia pets, etc) do such a good job that they finish their jobs faster than the rest of us.
Marcel
Grief doesn't fade, does it? It recedes. I guess, in waves. Mac died a week ago today, and I'm supposed to be better.

Who says?
I'm not.

Of course not.
On our morning walk, we crested a little hill where Mac and I used to watch the sun rise. I lost it.

This seems to be the tricky bit. I'll be fine for hours, then I trip into the hole in my heart again.
Pip and Gala simply pressed themselves close. God must like us, at least a little, to let us live with these companions. But why so soon do they go? Why so soon?

I'm telling you, tortoises, elephants and parrots should be the domesticated companion animals of choice. Not ephemeral dogs and cats.
Grief doesn't fade, does it? It recedes. I guess, in waves. Mac died a week ago today, and I'm supposed ... least a little, to let us live with these companions. But why so soon do they go? Why so soon?

Two steps forward, one step back, Chris. But I don't consider losing it a step back, its probably really a step forward.
I can't speak to you of God, as I was raised by two parents, one of whom became certain there was no God when he lost his first dog. But you are right - the perfect dog would be the dog that lived exactly as long as we did.
Oh Chris, I'm so sorry.
The hurt may fade, eventually, but not this soon. You have to process it, live through it, cry into it, bleed into it, and lay it down before it can fade. You'll always have it, like an old war wound, but it will hurt less after a while.
Have you ever read C.S. Lewis "A grief observed" ? Not for everyone's tastes I know, but it is one of the most accurate descriptions of heart-rending grief that I've ever read. The beauty of it, is that he walks you through his process, and sort of, through yours. It validates what you're going through, the physicality of it, and just the mental torture.
Why so soon? A good question. To remind us of our own mortality? To remind us that they are only lent, not given, to us? Because they manage to achieve their own purpose sooner than we?

I wish I could offer you more than a cyber-shoulder to cry upon, Chris. Mac was your friend, and you loved him. You miss him. You need to grieve for him, and this will take time. Hold Pip and Gala close to your heart and let them help you bear the pain. It certainly sounds as though they are willing enough.
-Shannon
Grief doesn't fade, does it?

Yes - but over time. But don't expect it to disappear entirely. Eventually it merges with memory so it isn't as painful.
It recedes. I guess, in waves.

Yes. And like waves some will be large and some will be small and they will gradually be spaced further and further apart, yet some will suddenly come rushing to shore.
Mac died a week ago today, and I'm supposed to be better.

Says who? That's not realistic. You can't force your heart regardless of what your brain says.
I'm not.

Don't expect to be, just let it be.
On our morning walk, we crested a little hill where Mac and I used to watch the sun rise. I ... least a little, to let us live with these companions. But why so soon do they go? Why so soon?

Dunno, maybe so we touch more lives? Maybe so its our burden and our loss, not theirs?

Diane Blackman
http://dog-play.com /
http://dog-play.com/shop2.html
Grief doesn't fade, does it? It recedes. I guess, in waves.

it comes and goes in ebbs and surges.
Mac died a week ago today, and I'm supposed to be better. I'm not.

you aren't supposed to be anything of the sort.
On our morning walk, we crested a little hill where Mac and I used to watch the sun rise. I ... least a little, to let us live with these companions. But why so soon do they go? Why so soon?

that's how it goes. you're going about your business and wham! something reminds you and you're right back at square one again. the good news is that it will* get better. the bad news is that it may take awhile. the really good news is that one day you'll realize that those overwhelming moments of grief have turned into moments of memory that make your heart warm and make you smile. it *will happen, so don't wish these remembrances away. you'll cherish them later.

shelly (perfectly foul wench) and elliott and harriet http://home.bluemarble.net/~scouvrette
Show more