Hey guys (and girls)!!
I was just complaining to fr0glet about rather few rescues/adoptions I have had lately and here I have one comming in a few days.

Apparently someone (as usual) did the unthinkable!!! Bought a Boa Constrictor and had no idea about size and such.

I was at the monthly meeting for my local reptile society and found out this poor guy is in bad need of a home so I offered to take him in. (No-one else was offering and the poor thing cant be left where it is) I will be honest and say that I have SOME experience with snakes but not alot. I one snake I lived with (I hate saying owned) was a 22' albino python named timothy. I got him when he was already 9-12 years old and kept him till he died at around 20-22 years old. He had been in a traveling reptile show and was very tame and friendly so he really was little work.
Here is the little I know about this Boa:
I know he needs a home badly.
I believe he is about 8-9 feet long right now.
I know he will probably get a little bigger (maybe 10-11 feet total) I will have more info later today after I talk with our rescue co-ordinator

What I need is ..
As much basic info about Boa Constrictors as possible. ie. feeding at different ages, usual temperment, best enclosure info, any special care issues, you know the stuff.
Basically anything you think I should know.
I dont have him here yet and I refuse to take him on until I have all the info I need. It wouldnt be fair to him if I didnt know what I was doing.
Thanks in advance for the help
Rob
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
Hey guys (and girls)!! I was just complaining to fr0glet about rather few rescues/adoptions I have had lately and here ... wouldnt be fair to him if I didnt know what I was doing. Thanks in advance for the help Rob

To be honest Rob, with your limited experience, you may want to REALLY reconsider taking on the role of a reptile rescuer for a large Boid such as this. Although not really rocket science in their care and needs, one does have to do a bit of homework before taking on a large snake, preparing for things such as appetite/food items, cage size, temps, humidity levels, etc.

It can be a learning curve to learn to care for Boids, but you are now considering becoming a new owner of one with the added "bonus" of it being a rescued animal...which probably means it hasn't had the best of care, and may have underlying medical problems.
There are just so many variables in regards to rescuing reptiles, especially large reptiles such as Boids & Iguana's, I'm afraid that what you are going to need to know in a short amount of time is going to be quite difficult for anyone here to explain in the space provided this NG.

My first bit of sage advice:
Make an appointment with a qualified vet to have this animal checked out for any medical problems. If you do not have the resources to do so, do NOT get in to the rescue end of reptile ownership. As a rescuer, you are taking on the role of bettering the conditions and health of animals, and veterinary care is paramount in this effort.
There are so many on-line resources available to you if you are looking for information in regards to Boa Constrictors, just do a search and you will find a plethora of information.
But remember, what you read is based on "best case" scenarios...your situation is different as this animal is coming to you as a rescue/abandoned animal, so many of the care tips may not be apply in your situation.

For example, Boa's require a certain amount of humidity. BUT, if you have a Boa with severe burns, for example, you must reduce the humidity levels low enough to allow for proper healing, while still maintaining a "healthy" level for the animal over-all.
Sit down and think about what you are getting yourself in to.

I applaud your wanting to take this animal in, but do a bit of research before jumping in with both feet. Chances are good that once you have a large snake such as this, you are stuck with it as they are NOT easy animals to get rid of once they are past the "cute" stage, such as the one you are describing.
If a large Boa (or Python) is something you are interested in, purchase one from a reputable breeder, and give yourself the time to learn how to care for it, and to reap the benefits of owning a snake in good health from day-one.
Good luck.
~Wade
What I need is .. As much basic info about Boa Constrictors as possible. ie. feeding at different ages, usual ... wouldnt be fair to him if I didnt know what I was doing. Thanks in advance for the help Rob

Please don't take this wrong, Rob.
The normal method of internet research is a google search for care sheets on the animal you're researching, tons of reading of care sheets, then narrowing down your queries to a few specific questions to post to RPH. You're far more likely to get good thorough thought-out answers to your questions if they are specific... and all the info you requested above is available all over the internet. Most of us don't have time to create an entire care sheet here!

Happy researching! Emotion: smile
fr0glet
To be honest Rob, with your limited experience, you may want to REALLY reconsider taking on the role of a ... of homework before taking on a large snake, preparing for things such as appetite/food items, cage size, temps, humidity levels,etc.

Well, I'm on the net looking and asking here as well ... Looks like homework to me!!
My main things right now are to get to know the main basic housing requirements (ie. temp/humidity/size), temperment and best food for his current size. The rest will be researched while he is in my care. I already know a number of things due to some checking I have done. I will be checking on things soon like:
-Different medical problems he might have/get and thier signs -Possible reasons for appetite change and how to correct -Changes in appetite and food types as he ages
-Proper shedding info
I dont take getting this guy as a simple thing. I have alot of time on my hands
and the resources as well. My local reptile society is the one setting this up
and will be giving me alot of info. I just figured that I would get a head-start. The more info I have, the better!!!
Better that I take him then leave him where he is and eventually get released
in the wild or let loose in the city. I take the responsability seriously and
with a level head. I know what I am getting into.
It isnt my first time ... just my first Boa!!
Cant be much harder than a 22' albino python!!
And if it is .. I enjoy a challenge!
There are just so many variables in regards to rescuing reptiles,especially large reptiles such as Boids & Iguana's, I'm afraid ... short amount of time is going to be quite difficultfor anyone here to explain in the space provided this NG.

Actually, I guess you didnt read the little write-up about myself that I posted a few months back. I have done alot of rescue including Iguanas. When I said the comment in my post about few rescues here I meant since I moved here to Edmonton Alberta from Ottawa Ontario. I was a rescue home there for all sorts of reptiles and turtles for both the local societies
and the local humane society.
My first bit of sage advice: Make an appointment with a qualified vet to have this animal checked outfor any medical problems.getting yourself in to.

This has already been done.
Had appointment and is in relatively good health.
Slightly malnourished but good health overall.
this is through the local reptile society. The first thing they do is get the animals checked!!
I applaud your wanting to take this animal in, but do a bit of research before jumping in with both ... NOT easyanimals to get rid of once they are past the "cute" stage, such as the one you are describing.

Not looking for the "Cute" stage.
Also not looking for an easy pet.
On top of this, when I take this guy, it's for good. I understand that I need to get lots of info and do a fair bit of research. I was just checking here to see if anyone might suggest good resources. (ie. websites and such)
Good luck. ~Wade

Thanks ..
Rob
Please don't take this wrong, Rob. The normal method of internet research is a google search for care sheets on ... over the internet. Most of us don't have time to create an entire care sheet here! Happy researching! Emotion: smile fr0glet

Thanks fr0glet
Actually, i was just trying to see if anyone might have any good suggestions on specific sources (websites). Already in Mid-Google but it's a pain. So much stuff having nothing to do with anything! I'll keep looking though.
Rob
I would think if you kept a 22 foot Python, you should have no trouble at all with a Boa. I do have a few questions, if ya don't mind me asking. Are the lengths you quoted measured lengths, or "guesstimates"? A 22 footer would be a job, regardless of how tame and friendly it may be. I am supposing this was a Burmese? In any case, 22 feet would be huge, and almost positively a female. Same with the Boa, if it is truly 8-9 feet already, it is probably a female.

I have seen very few Boas reach over 10 feet or so, although I know it's possible. Males usually stay around 7-8 feet. Note the word "usually". Most people grossly over-estimate size ithese snakes. Most 20+ foot snakes I have seen, were actually no more than 14-15 feet, tops. It's very hard to get an accurate measurement on a large snake. I once raised a Retic to 23 feet. She made it easy by laying still in a hallway with 12 inch square floor tiles.

She was straight against the wall, and covered a full 23 squares. All this being said, what Boa info are you in need of?
Roger
Boas are usually a docile snake, although some can be unpredictable. Each has it's own personality. You'll just have to see how the one you are getting is. My female is 7-8 feet, but only 3-4 years old, if that. She eats 3-4 large, or 2 jumbo rats every 7-10 days. A young, fast growing snake will need to eat more than an older, slower growing one. One to two rats matched to her body size every week or so should be fine. Again, just see how your snake acts, and watch for signs telling you when it wants to eat. Mine is in a 4'x2' floor space enclosure. Most people think snakes need a much larger area than they actually do. Again, if you kept a 22 foot Python, you should have no problems at all with a Boa.
Roger
I would think if you kept a 22 foot Python, you should have no trouble at all with a Boa. I do have a few questions, if ya don't mind me asking. Are the lengths you quoted measured lengths, or "guesstimates"?

Vet checked himself ... no guess here.
I'll post a few pics if I can find the album.
Was called Timothy but "YES" she was a female.(Dont ask me why ... was her name when I got her!!) (I think she got into his cup of coffee once and kept trying to go back ... ie. Tim Hortons Coffee ... Yummm!!) She had been part of a mobile reptile show for many years. I often chatted with the guy who ran the show and he came to me one day saying she was gettin a bit testy. She no-longer liked to be placed on various peoples shoulders and such for pictures so he asked if I might consider giving her a permanent home.

She was a beautiful snake (loved the white and yellow color) and rather friendly. I gave her the smaller of the 3 bedrooms in my house. Did a little modification however. Covered the floor with linoleum and extended it 1 foot up the wall. This allowed me to put a small black outdoor pond with pump and small fountain spout in the room with her without worrying about damaging the floor. I also had to re-hinge the door to open up outwards so I wouldn't run her over opening the door to the room ...

hehehehe Anyhow ... back to the new one . . . . .
All this being said, what Boa info are you in need of? Roger

Just looking for links to caresheet and basic housing info. Any info other than that would just be a bonus and save me more time searching. The Boa is in relatively good health so I dont have to take any special precautions right now. My main concern right now is making the transition a smooth one and getting him/her settled.
Hey guys (and girls)!! I was just complaining to fr0glet about rather few rescues/adoptions I have had lately and here ... wouldnt be fair to him if I didnt know what I was doing. Thanks in advance for the help Rob[/nq]Do you know anymore about this snake? Any health issues? A visit to a qualified vet is mandatory before bringing the snake home. Mites, would be obvious, but there are many other problems you must know about before taking on this responsibility. Are you planning on keeping this snake or fostering until you find a good home for the snake? You may need some time to find someone properly prepared to take this snake home. Do you now have a supplier of jumbo rats to feed the snake? Are you willing to spend the money to provide the proper set up and food for this snake for an undetermined amount of time? Of course we all know the enclosure can't be too big, so the enclosure has to be large enough for the snake, but small enough to fit into your home.

I've seen these snake kept in sweater boxes, but in my opinion that's way too small. I've also seen a 6 foot snake have a walk-in in closet converted into an enclosure. Are you prepared to possibly spend hundreds of dollars on this snake if it does have medical problems?

Now if you still feel comfortable with taking this snake home, consider this.It would seem like the previous owner is afraid of this snake because of its size. So does that mean this snake hasn't been handled on a regular basis? If it hasn't been handled regularly, it probably means that a human hand could be associated with food. This is not a good thing as you can imagine. With your experience with a 22 foot long snake you must realize that a large snake can quickly become a handful in a hurry.

Without knowing anything about this snake or its temperament, I would strongly suggest you not handle this snake without having another experienced person helping you. Be prepared for a violent strike to your arm or hand. If this occurs, know beforehand what to do. I got hit by a friend's Retic and could have been injured much more severely if not for BOTH of us knowing what to do.
This decision is yours to make. Just remember 2 wrongs don't make a right. It would be nice to be able to rescue all the animals that need help, but we can't. Please consider this as friendly advise and not a doom and gloom letter. I just want to make sure you know what you could possibly be getting into.
Good Luck!
Jim Smith

Blaming the gun for murder, is like blaming the car for hit and run!
Show more