Against my recommendations, one of my daughters has gotten a baby red eared slider turtle. I have never owned any of this species, so I'm not certain of their care, especially not a baby. Her turtle does not seem to be eating. We are trying commercially available turtle food. Does anyone have any advice what we may use to entice her to eat? Any recommendations for the best feeding methods?
Leslie A Rhorer (Email Removed) typed this:
Against my recommendations, one of my daughters has gotten ababy red eared slider turtle. I have never owned any of ... anyone have any advice what we may use to entice her to eat? Any recommendations for the best feeding methods?

Please use google and a library to learn more about red eared sliders.

Try reducing the animal's stress by covering 3 sides of the cage. Try floating vegetable matter, like dark leafy greens. Try nightcrawlers. Then google more!
fr0glet
I have read up some, thanks. Often interactive sessions produce a better understanding and better results.
Try reducing the animal's stress by covering 3 sides of the cage. Try

We'll give it a shot.
floating vegetable matter, like dark leafy greens.

Also easily done.
Try nightcrawlers.

By that, I presume you mean earthworms? Is it better to put them on the dry land or in the water area of the habitat? I know in the water they will drown. We'll drop by a sporting goods.
Against my recommendations, one of my daughters has gotten a baby red eared slider turtle. I have never owned any ... anyone have any advice what we may use to entice her to eat? Any recommendations for the best feeding methods?

I prefer to put turtles into a separate, smaller enclosure with just a small amount of water for feeding, if possible. This not only makes it easier for the turtle to find it's food, but it makes keeping the large tank much easier.
Juvenile RES eat alot less plant material than adults, so while you should still offer greens don't be surprised if the turtle prefers raw bits of fish, crickets (I usually kill them by freezing before putting them into the tank so they don't crawl out), worms, and the occasional mouse chunk to the greens. Add turtle pellets to the mix and you have a fairly varied diet.
When you feed vertebrate prey to your turtle remember that bones and innards are part of the natural diet too, not just the nice meaty parts that we consider food.
-Z
We are trying commercially available turtle food. Does anyone have any advice what we may use to entice her to eat?

Commercially available turtle food is rubbish. Try offering her raw fish or meat, RES are carnivores who have been known to take ducklings in the wild
Commercially available turtle food is rubbish. Try offering her raw fish or meat, RES are carnivores who have been known to take ducklings in the wild

RES are omnivores, and some commercially available turtle food is a perfectly respectable addition to a varied diet. It adds nutrients that may be missed with the limited food options we humans offer our captive animals.

-Z