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Does he need to be euthanized? Or can he be re-trained for placement? Can this tendancy be removed?

Self-protection is not a "tendency" and trying to train any animal to accept abuse would be just plain wrong. Yes, your dog will have to be euthanized but, as you note, it is not his fault.
Lynn K.
Does he need to be euthanized?

No. He needs to be rehomed in a place where the children are better behaved. Or after his poor experiences with children, perhaps a home with no children.
I would contact beagle rescue in your area, explain the situation and once the dog's quarantine is over, you can pick him up and turn him over to them.
Does he need to be euthanized?

No. He needs to be rehomed in a place where the children are better behaved. Or after his poor experiences ... area, explain the situation andonce the dog's quarantine is over, you can pick him up and turn him over tothem.

I believe the OP tried this route and received the very normal "sorry, we don't take dogs with bite histories." Very few rescues will do so because the liability is too high. Even knowing why the dog bit doesn't erase the fact that it has a record now.

Tara
Things like, putting a pillowcase on their head and making noises at him, to get him to do the howling bark that beagles do.

Is THAT how his nose got bitten? Was the other incident similar?

That puts a whole new perspective on the dog's behavior.

What you described about the incident before this detail sounded like the probable scenario of the dog giving several ignored warnings, and then attacking to protect himself from a perceived threat.

That would be an entirely different situation than a dog being highly overstimulated who hasn't been properly taught to inhibit his mouth going after a howling pillow case (that just happens to have your son's head in it).

If this is the case, and your kids have truly learned their lesson, then yes, there is hope for the dog. You can get in touch with a behaviorist who specializes in aggression and have the dog evaluated. Find a good reward-based obedience class, and ensure that the kids attend. Make them pay for the behaviorist out of allowance money or doing chores. The obedience class is something you should have done in the first place, but I'm sure you know that now. :}
You could go that route even if the bite was intentional, but I can understand your wife's reluctance to risk any more of her children's faces. If a dog has bitten twice in anger or fear to stop your children from doing something to him, then he knows that it *works.* It stopped them, didn't it?

But if it was unintentional, my goodness, all it may take is training and future restraint on the part of your children!
How old did you say he was?
PetsMart Pet Trainer
My Kids, My Students, My Life:
http://hometown.aol.com/dfrntdrums/myhomepage/index.html Last updated June 27 at 10:00 a.m.
I believe the OP tried this route and received the very normal "sorry, we don't take dogs with bite histories." ... liability is too high. Even knowing why the dog bit doesn't erase the fact that it has a record now.

that's why you don't let the dog near
a dog murdering "rescuer" like yourself
or lynn killmakos.
I hope that heelps.

this is michael
reporting live...
http://dogtv.com
BRILLIANT
http://dogtv.com/sionnach.wmv
Things like, putting a pillowcase on their head and making noises at him, to get him to do the howling bark that beagles do.

Is THAT how his nose got bitten? Was the other incident similar? That puts a whole new perspective on the ... say he was? PetsMart Pet Trainer My Kids, My Students, My Life: http://hometown.aol.com/dfrntdrums/myhomepage/index.html Last updated June 27 at 10:00 a.m.

2.5 years old.

Bite went like this:
My oldest (12yo, the "victim" ) was playing with him, as in approaching him slowly, which gets the dog going. We yelled at him to stop, and he did.
A few minutes later, the dog was in his bed (on floor, next to our bed) and my son jumped on our bed, with his upper body hanging over the area where the dog was laying down in his bed. He then reached down, put his head next to the dog's, and hugged him, at which time he growled. At this time my wife told him to get his face away from the dog, because that is not a good idea. REalizing the dog growled, my son released the hug, and moved back away from him quickly, at which time the dog lunged at him and bit him in the face.
It may be too late for your Beagle, but you need to teach your children how to behave around dogs so the same fate doesn't befall your Schnauzer.

You seem to be missing the point that your children need some manners. When you tell a child no, they should obey you. Kids who are 11 & 12 don't know any better than to torment a dog? You've got a real problem. I was assuming they were toddlers & was going to send you some helpful links, but it's too late for that. Hope your kids don't end up in a juvenile facilty one day.
Tracy
It may be too late for your Beagle, but you need to teach your children how to behave around dogs ... links, but it's too late for that. Hope your kids don't end up in a juvenile facilty one day. Tracy

Juvenile facility?
man...you guys must have some REALLY whacked out children!

My children, dog not withstanding, are well-behaved, socially adjusted, do extremely well in school, and score extremely high on the state tests.

I don't know what YOU people are used to, but boy do you guys make a LEAP!!!
My oldest (12yo, the "victim" ) was playing with him, as in approaching him slowly, which gets the dog going. ... moved back away from him quickly, at which time the dog lunged at him and bit him in the face.

Eek. Okay, that was intentional.
PetsMart Pet Trainer
My Kids, My Students, My Life:
http://hometown.aol.com/dfrntdrums/myhomepage/index.html Last updated June 27 at 10:00 a.m.
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