I live in S. Florida, and have a problem that I need help with.

We have a 2.5 YO male beagle, and he has bitten each of our 2 children. Today was serious, and required a plastic surgeon to stitch my son's nose back up at the hospital ER.
It isn't all his fault, though. The kids seemed to enjoy taunting and teasing him, and getting him to bark, howl, and growl at them.

Obviously, he gets fed up. We have tried, but the kids won't stop.

I called animal control and they picked him up, and will quarantine him for 10 days for rabies check, then put him to sleep. The saddest part, was when animal control arrived, we went to the garage to get him, and he happily grabbed his leash (which was attached to his collar) in his mouth ready to go for a walk.
Is there any hope for him? It would really break my heart to have him euthanized, as he is a sweetheart when not defensive/growling/barking. He has this thing he does, which if I lie on the floor on my back, he puts his head on my neck, and rubs his head against me, like kissing/hugging me.
Does he need to be euthanized? Or can he be re-trained for placement? Can this tendancy be removed? He is such a beautiful animal, and it's breaking my heart. However, I would hate for this to happen to another family. My wife refuses to have anything to do with him after today, and I can't disagree with her, considering what he did to my oldest.

Please help.
Tony
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Have you considered rehoming your children? They deserve to grow up in a place where they're supervised, taught good manners, taught the proper treatment of animals, aren't in danger of needing emergency care and plastic surgery for their own actions, and aren't living in fear that they'll be sent away to be killed for reacting normally to threats.
Lia
Have you considered rehoming your children? They deserve to grow up in a place where they're supervised, taught good manners, ... actions, and aren't living in fear that they'll be sent away to be killed for reacting normally to threats. Lia

Have you thought about crawling back under the rock from whence you came?
I can't believe it.

3 responses, and not one single constructive idea.Just criticism. I already know, and mentioned, our mistakes. Making snide remarks about that is not going to help the dog.

I guess this is the wrong group - I was looking for a group with animal lovers, from where I could get some ideas as to how to save the dog's life.
I guess I was wrong.
Oh, don't bother replying, because obviously this is the wrong place.

I will pursue other avenues to try to help the dog.
I can't believe it. 3 responses, and not one single constructive idea. Just criticism. I already know, and mentioned, our mistakes. Making snide remarks about that is not going to help the dog.

But maybe it will drive home the seriousness of what you allowed to happen. A dog loses his life because you've failed to instill a sense of decency and kindness in your children. That's a pretty important thing to be doing, don't you think?
Besides asking yourself if this dog can be rehomed, you should be asking yourself what you should be doing to reform your children. You don't say how old they are, but there may be a chance for them if you start now.
I guess this is the wrong group - I was looking for a group with animal lovers, from where I could get some ideas as to how to save the dog's life.

We are animal lovers, which is why we're horrified that you allowed your children to torment and animal as you did.
Beagle rescue is your best bet, but you really do need to address the issue with your children, and never get a dog again as well.
Janet Boss
http://bestfriendsdogobedience.com /
I can't believe it. 3 responses, and not one single ... remarks about that is not going to help the dog.

But maybe it will drive home the seriousness of what you allowed to happen. A dog loses his life because you've failed to instill a sense of decency and kindness in your children. That's a pretty important thing to be doing, don't you think?

They're good kids (11 & 12), they just get out of hand at times. They're now realizing what they did, and how we failed. I guess I was being blind, and never saw it coming. The dog would sleep with them on their beds and all. They would "play" with him for 5-10 minutes, and then stop, and he'd go lay down with them. Things like, putting a pillowcase on their head and making noises at him, to get him to do the howling bark that beagles do. I think that was their goal - the howling bark that they make.
It is really quite distressing - I'm having a hard time dealing with the consequences of our failures, as I know in my heart the dog is not at fault.
It is really quite distressing - I'm having a hard time dealing with the consequences of our failures, as I know in my heart the dog is not at fault.

It's very distressing. If you can rehome the dog in a home who understands the situation, that would obviously be the very best outcome. Beagle rescue groups should be able to assist you - don't do this on your own - too risky.

Adolescent males tend to be the highest percentage of dog bites, and usually facially, and your situation shows that as well. I remember evaluating a dog who had been adopted, went to a new home where the 12 year old twin boys had a sleepover for their birthday party, had pillowfights, including at the new dog, and the dog wound up biting the mother over a stolen candy bar. None of this should have happened. The new dog shouldn't have been subjected to that situation in the first place, and the adults are ultimately at fault.

He was a lucky one. He was evaluated and rehomed. Let's hope your pup has the same.
Janet Boss
http://bestfriendsdogobedience.com /
Perhaps you should take the kids to the vet with you (if you cannot find a home). The pain of seeing the consequences of their actions may wake them up.

Kristen and
Kali CDX, CGC, TDIA, TT
www.kristenandkali.com
Perhaps you should take the kids to the vet with you (if you cannot find a home). The pain of seeing the consequences of their actions may wake them up.

Actually, read my other posting about having a lead on a new home for him. Got 1-2 more leads at the same client-location.
Perhaps you should take the kids to the vet with you (if you cannot find a home). The pain of seeing the consequences of their actions may wake them up.

No! They're only 11 and 12 years old. Forcing children that age to witness violence of that nature would be akin to further child abuse. They've suffered enough. That would create guilt, nightmare type guilt, irrepairable eventual life threatening guilt. For children that age, you want to build conscience. Guilt is the knowledge that you've done something wrong and there's nothing you can do to fix it. It's a cloud that stays forever, never clean. Conscience leaves a way out, a possibility for redemption, a promise to do better in the future that wipes out all past misbehavior.
These kids were acting like kids. Kids do stupid things. They play near dangerous precipes. They don't think through the consequences of their actions. Parents (under the best of circumstances, not this one) guide and teach and leave room for kids to learn from minor mistakes where the consequences aren't too great. Parents keep their children from making irrepairable mistakes. They remove them from playing near those precipes until they're old enough to understand what will happen when they fall.
The fault here is with the parents who didn't supervise every interaction with that dog and send those children to their rooms at the first sign of teasing behavior with a stern "if you can't play nice, you won't get to play with the dog at all." An old-fashioned lecture about kindness and responsibility and looking at the world through the dog's eye view and treating others as we'd like to be treated is in order here too. Repeat as necessary. Lectures are boring, but they work.
It's that lack of parenting that disturbs me more than the poor dog's death. In the long run, that will have the most long term effect on the children and the society.
Lia
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