I've had my Lab puppy for two weeks now and he still doesn't seem to make any distinction between peeing inside or outside. I'm really struggling with this, because we don't seem to be making ANY progress. hopefully, I'm the one doing something wrong and we can get headed in the right direction.
he sleeps in his crate at night
we get up at 7:30 to go out and potty
at 8:00, he has breakfast in his crate and goes out about 8:30 same thing for lunch at 12:00
then dinner about 5:00
he gets water again at around 8:30
between those times, he doesn't get food or water. he is either outside, in his crate, or I am watching him at every moment. so it's not as if he's peeing in the house and I'm finding it later. he does it right in front of me. sometimes ten seconds after we come in from outdoors. it's also not like he's hiding or thinks he's done anything wrong. he just pees when he gets the urge, no matter where he is. well, I take that back, he doesn't eliminate in his crate.

when I do see him pee in the house, I yell "no! no!", immediately pick him up and take him to the back door and say something like "we potty outside" or "go potty". when I see him potty outside I always make a point to praise him. #2 hasn't been a problem, just the peeing. I've never scolded him for peeing inside, I just try to startle him into stopping when I catch him in the act.

so what do you guys think? how can I get this turned around and going in a positive direction?
1 2
Keep some small treats by your back door and pocket a couple for each trip outside. Don't show them to him, just wait until he goes potty then, while he's in the act "good boy, potty! potty!" in a happy voice. The minute he finishes praise him again and give the treat.

Praise alone, what you are doing, is a very good method but some dogs need a little extra incentive, particularly puppies. He'll begin to associate pottying outside with getting a treat vs pottying inside doesn't get a treat.
Also, buy some Nature's Miracle online or at a local pet supply store. Its an enzyme cleaner that removes the stain and the odor urine can leave behind. Compared to all the other products on the market this one really is a "miracle." Removing the odor from the places he's urinated will also help in the housetraining process. As long as puppies can smell a urination spot (this applies to older dogs new to the home as well) in the house a part of their brain may keep thinking its ok to go inside.

Tara
I've had my Lab puppy for two weeks now and he still doesn't seem to make any distinction between peeing inside or outside.

How old is he?
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he does it right in front of me. sometimes ten seconds after we come in from outdoors. it's also not like he's hiding or thinks he's done anything wrong. he just pees when he gets the urge, no matter where he is.

good luck, I have this exact problem since the 3rd week in August and his is still not getting it as well as he should
good luck, I have this exact problem since the 3rd week in August and his is still not getting it as well as he should

Waitaminnit, guys. Just how quickly do you think your pups "should" be housebroken?
The "norm" is different for different types of pups. Especially if you're not giving the dogs clear messages and allowing opportunity for mistakes, you can sometimes count on several months or longer. Many pups who are housebroken in just a couple of weeks have had a head start with the breeder.

And they also don't get housebroken very quickly if you give them too much freedom too fast. They will follow a progression of not eliminating in their immediate area, to the room they spend the most time in, and then to the rest of the house in small increments.
Plus you have to take into account their ages. Young pups aren't physically able to hold it for a long period of time, or even a short period of time when they're very active.
How long does it take children to get toilet trained? And they understand English.
Patience, persistence, and consistency is the key.

Canine Action Dog Trainer
http://www.canineaction.com
My Kids, My Students, My Life:
http://hometown.aol.com/dfrntdrums/myhomepage/index.html Build Your Immune System, Lose Weight
http://www.re-vita.net/dfrntdrums
when I do see him pee in the house, I yell "no! no!", immediately pick him up and take him ... act. so what do you guys think? how can I get this turned around and going in a positive direction?

It took my Lab pup about 6 months to be semi-reliable and another 6 months for me to completely trust him. It took him a good month to figure out that we actually wanted him to pee OUTSIDE and not pee inside. It's just about repitition and being diligent about correcting him EVERY time. Expect him to start to "get it" at about 3-4 months of age and become semi-reliable at about 7 months, IF you stick to a schedule.
He also took about 3 weeks to "get" that he was suppossed to start crying BEFORE he did #2 in his crate at night. (He'd wake up, go, and THEN cry because he was sitting in his own waste.)
Also remember that they won't want to "go" in their den. The whole house is not his den just the places he spends a lot of time. When I brought my pup home, we lived in a 2-story/3 bedroom apartment. He'd run to the front of the apartment, or into a spare bedroom, to "go" instead of alerting me. When we downsized into a 1br 1story, it "clicked" as the whole place was his den. So if you restrict him to areas he spends a lot of time, and slowly work him up to more space (spending more time in the less-used areas until they're "his") it will go quicker.

Emily Carroll
Fluttervale Labradors: www.fluttervale.com/kennel
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when I do see him pee in the house, I yell "no! no!", immediately

pick him up and take him to the back door and say something like "we potty outside" or "go potty". ... scolded him for peeing inside, I just try to startle him into stopping when I catch him in the act..>>

The pup might think yelling no no is scolding. It might frighten him rather than attract his attention.
and in future he could hide from you and then pee. If he is in full flow he won't be able to stop anyway.
If he is very young it takes while . carry on withe the praise and saying go potty. You have to say go potty at the right time , when he is full flow or he won't get the meaning of it.
Alison
Keep some small treats by your back door and pocket a couple for each trip outside. Don't show them to ... boy, potty! potty!" in a happy voice. The minute he finishes praise him again and give the treat.

ok, that's sounds good. I'll try the treats when he potties, starting today...
pick him up and take him to the back door ... him into stopping when I catch him in the act..>>

The pup might think yelling no no is scolding. It might frighten him rather than attract his attention. and in ... potty at the right time , when he is full flow or he won't get the meaning of it. Alison

I don't think he thinks he being scolded, or I would get some kind of reaction. He really doesn't act like he thinks he's doing anything wrong. I mean, he's just peeing right in plain view, two feet away from where I'm standing.
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