Wanted advice in choosing between the following birds, situation described below:
Senegal
Quaker
Budgie

I'm looking for something more interactive a hampster or canary, and less of a bull in a china shop than the black lab.

I have a large sunny temperature-controlled home office (off limits to the dog), and I was hoping to have the bird live there. Attention level: morning and evening for 15 minutes or so each, and just regular but short interactions during the day. Ovbiously there would be longer attention sessions too, I'm trying to outline a minimum daily routine to find a bird suited to it.
I prefer to let the office vary between 65-and 75, but I can keep it at a fairly constant 70 if necessary.
I have two pre-teen kids, so the bird would get other family attention and occasional living room time with family etc. The kids might be interested in active involvement with the bird, or it could just be "my bird". Could go either way, depending on the bird.

I want a bird that's smart, but not too needy for constant attention. It seemd pretty clear I should rule out things like 'toos based on the information I've collected there.
I have customer calls in my office, so I also need a bird that's modest in the sound department. Raucous chatter all day wouldn't work out. (This requirement alone may do in the whole idea).

I take good care of my pets, but maybe this wasn't meant to be.

The birds I suggested were based on my limited research and interaction so far. I haven't see much personality from the only senegal I've seen. The quakers have lots of personality and weren't loud (what charmers!). I'm interested in any bird's ability to talk too.

Suggestions and such are welcome. I'm also interested in bird breeders and or possible adoption situations in Massachusetts.

Also interested: how are these birds with music? I'm trying to figure out if I can still practice the trumpet in my office, or if I need to take it to another room. I was kind of hoping that some birds might like the music and join in. I am not a quiet trumpet player. I belt it out.
Thanks in advance. Replies here please, I won't get your email.

Email from unknown persons will be blocked by spam filters. (Silently eaten, you won't get a reply, I won't get your mail). Please post replies to the news conference. Thank you.
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Wanted advice in choosing between the following birds, situation described below: Senegal Quaker Budgie I have a ... Attention level: morning and evening for 15 minutes or so each, and just regular but short interactions during the day.

If you are working in the office all day, I would think the bird would get enough attention. Birds need some direct attention where you talk and play with them and then they also can enjoy just being near you while you work. I think the big problem may turn out to be noise. There are very few quiet birds - the ones you listed are not among them. Quakers, budgies, senegals, tiels all can be quite loud, especially when they are happy or want your attention. I would see this as a problem in a home office if the noise bothers you or if you are on the phone a lot.

So you should take this into consideration.
Janet Levy
Wanted advice in choosing between the following birds, situation described ... each, and just regular but short interactions during the day.

If you are working in the office all day, I would think the bird would get enough attention. Birds need ... bothers you or if you are on the phone a lot. So you should take this into consideration. Janet Levy

Not to mention the mess, the chewing of papers and phone cords (or computer cords, lost a mouse just the other day...), the dust and dander, the food splattered on the walls, the cage cleaning, the vet bills..
Wanted advice in choosing between the following birds, situation described below: Senegal Quaker Budgie I'm looking for ... in the sound department. Raucous chatter all day wouldn't work out. (This requirement alone may do in the whole idea).

I'm sorry but based on the information you have given so far, a bird is not the pet you want in the environment you want. All birds are noisy, they chatter and chirp during the day. When a stranger calls or it anticipates being let out of the cage or given attention, it will get noisier. A quaker is the worst choice on your list for noise. They are little watch birds which will scream and yell if a stranger enters its home. Birds also make a helluva mess with seed husks, dried poops and dust. Is this really what you need in your home office to which customers come? Your will need to let the bird out every day for a fly about or exersize and 15 minutes attention twice a day is just not enough.
I have to ask, what motivated you to considering having a bird as a pet?
Wanted advice in choosing between the following birds, situation described below: Senegal Quaker Budgie I'm looking for ... not a quiet trumpet player. I belt it out. Thanks in advance. Replies here please, I won't get your email.

Why do you rule out canaries? I think they're very misunderstood. Certainly I don't handle mine, but he's very interactive. I, too, have a home office although not all that many customers calling in. Maybe it's just the software biz, but they don't care if they hear budgies chirping away.
I'd suggest not getting a hand-tamed bird unless more than just you is going to want to handle it.
My canary responds to music, whistling and other human interaction. Either canary or budgie would like your trumpet, I imagine. My birds like the piano a lot.
You may not hear your canary respond when you're playing because their voices are relatively quiet. Certainly far quieter than kids ...

My setup is a single German Roller canary in one cage, and two budgies (parakeets most pet stores) in another.
Just a couple thoughts.
I have customer calls in my office, so I also ... out. (This requirement alone may do in the whole idea).

I'm sorry but based on the information you have given so far, a bird is not the pet you want ... out every day for a fly about or exersize and 15 minutes attention twice a day is just not enough.

I don't actually have any customers on the premises, just customer calls by phone. The office is a sunny but chaotic mess, a bird might feel right at home.
I was anticipating having the bird out of its cage pretty much all day every day (not at night), except when I'm away from the house.
I have to ask, what motivated you to considering having a bird as a pet?

I used to have a Canary. Loved the song all day coming from behind me in the office. But I can't have something quite that steadily noisy with my current types of phone calls, and I was looking for something more interactive.
I don't actually spend that much time on the phone, it isn't as big a deal as it sounds, but there may be an hour or two some days where I'm on calls in which important to have quiet in the background.

And most of the day I'm there and can talk back to them. I just can't get up from my computer to interactively play with them all day, I have to be getting work done.
Suggestions and such are welcome. I'm also interested in bird ... in advance. Replies here please, I won't get your email.

Please don't get a bird. I don't think you would enjoy being a birdkeeper and I don't think the bird would enoy life with you.

Valuable feedback. That's why I'm trying to consider the angles before leaping in.
I don't doubt that you are a great dog owner and concientioously give the dog plenty of hard exersize, daily ... Being half deaf and having the tolerance of a saint are 2 essential qualities lol. Not being houseproud is another.

Long stories here. I enjoy all the family pets, but none of them are my pet, and that's been by design. I have a pet void since the canary died. The dog is too big and communicates only by telepathy (doesn't even bark). A watch-bird would be a step up in defense of the house. The dog is 80 pounds of pure toenails and my wood floors no longer have their finish. Perhaps I need something to destroy the upper elevations of the house.
I'm looking for something smaller, slightly more communicative, but just as smart.
As you and others say, a parrot might not be a match. I already know I'm half nuts to consider it. But I'm not hurrying.

Thanks for the input.
Why do you rule out canaries? I think they're very misunderstood. Certainly I don't handle mine, but he's very interactive. ... many customers calling in. Maybe it's just the software biz, but they don't care if they hear budgies chirping away.

My canary was just too frightened. The closest we got to any understanding was the canary's appreciation for the color of the "treat dish", which was a useful training aid in other activities (like getting him to take a bath).
But he would never accept food from me, etc. He was just frightened to death. In fact that's potentially how he died. (Uncovered his cage one morning, he fluttered around a bit, I came back 20 minutes later and he was dead).
(Yes, I talk before uncovering, I don't sneak up on them).

Even the hampster is far more interactive than the canary was. (Or any other canary I've possessed.) The hampster responds to my voice from across the room in anticipation of apple treats and such. (Alas, hampsters are genetically predisposed to short, awful lives, so sad, the current one is now beyond my vet's capabilities to help).
I'd suggest not getting a hand-tamed bird unless more than just you is going to want to handle it.

Why is that?
I suspect my kids would enjoy the bird as a pet. But that depends on a lot of factors, including the bird of course. The dog only has eyes for its master, it's not very interactive with the kids.
My canary responds to music, whistling and other human interaction. Either canary or budgie would like your trumpet, I imagine. My birds like the piano a lot.

My concern with the trumpet is that it's so loud. Of course so is a parrot scream. I have no data to go on here, I didn't play the trumpet when I had the canary. (But there's always music in my office, thanks to wonderful streaming internet jazz stations).
Phil,
Have you checked out a parrotlet? They are adorable, loving, intelligent, active and a blast.
They're also way more quiet than the other birds you've mentioned (way, way more quiet!).
The only draw back is that you have to have lots of toys and chewies for them if you're not planning on spending 24/7 with them perched on your shoulder.
If you bring a baby bird home, they will learn to require the attention you give them. If you spend 24/7 with them the first month, then suddenly only spend 30 minutes a day with them, you're going to have an unhappy and unhealthy bird. If, however, you read up on parrotlets and their needs, and spend your time and energy accordingly, you can have a delightful little companion and a healthy, happy bird! If you're interested, let me know. I belong to a wonderful list and know several breeders. ~Kimberlee
Wanted advice in choosing between the following birds, situation described ... each, and just regular but short interactions during the day.

If you are working in the office all day, I would think the bird would get enough attention. Birds need ... bothers you or if you are on the phone a lot. So you should take this into consideration. Janet Levy

'Tiels aren't on his list.
The major problem with noise is that the vast majority of people don't have any clue as to how to handle it. Their attempts to lesson the noise factor fail because they are actually encouraging it and don't realize it. It's not just inexperienced people either. Many many people who have had birds for years do the same thing.
There's only one bird on his list that has significant potential to be excessively noisy - the quaker.
Senegals can be very loud but it's usually very bief. Budgies can be consistantly chatty, but the volume is within reason. Males are significantly less chatty than females.

Steve
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