1 2 3 4 5 6 7
What's "Parade Magazine" anyhow? It doesn't sound like something a professional vet etc would use as a source of trustworthy information...

Right - it's a bunch of advertising wrapped around filler text and inserted into Sunday newspapers in the US. It's Marilyn vos Savant's main outlet, if that's a clue.

They do one thing I like, though, and that's "Make a Difference Day."

Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

Prouder than ever to be a member of the reality-based community
What's "Parade Magazine" anyhow? It doesn't sound like something a professional vet etc would use as a source of trustworthy information.

Parade Magazine is an insert that many (U.S.) national newspapers include in their Sunday edition. A little celebrity gossip, some comics, a question and answer puzzle column, a bit of popular medical advice, maybe something on parenting or helping kids do well in school, a photograpy contest. It was never meant to be in depth or comprehensive on anything, but they're not usually controversial or wrong. You're correct that Parade Magazine is hardly a veterinary journal, but neither does it give out senseless advice with no basis whatsoever which is why I had questions about their "never feed your pet" list.
Lia
I know I'm not the only one here who gives my dog mushrooms.

I haven't eaten a mushroom stem since I've owned dogs. They seem to like the earthiness, even vegetable-disliking Friday. Apple cores are something else I'm not going to worry about until I see the dogs are chewing the seeds.

Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
I know I'm not the only one here who gives my dog mushrooms.

I haven't eaten a mushroom stem since I've owned dogs. They seem to like the earthiness, even vegetable-disliking Friday. Apple cores are something else I'm not going to worry about until I see the dogs are chewing the seeds.

Ditto. I let my dogs have apple cores although I hold onto them and the three of them take turns gnawing off chunks. That's when I'm eating an apple. I would never let them have a batch of applesauce's worth of cores.
Yesterday's Parade Magazine gave the following list of foods never to feed your pet: Alcohol Apple cores Avocado Bones Caffeine ... cheese, ham, mushrooms, potato peels and tuna? I'm especially curious bout the cheese. We've been wrapping Cubbe's meds in cheese.

I hate prescriptive lists like this that don't give reasons. Some of these strike me as being rather odd, especially if the quantities are small.
Apple cores - I assume seedless would be ok.
Cheese? I've fed all of my dogs cheese in moderation. Not moldy cheese (I don't like it, so I don't buy it), but cheddar, jack, etc.

Raw bones?
Fat - fat is essential to life. Sure, there are some types of fats that are better/worse than others, and an excessive amount isn't healthy, but a blanket prohibition?
Garlic - is that all garlic or just raw garlic?
Liver is a component of many commercial pet foods. Sure, a whole beef liver might contain too many toxins and iron, but a little, in moderation?
Why mushrooms (if known not to be a toxic variety)?

Tuna - again, is this in large quantities? What is wrong with a little tuna, or salmon, or mackerel...
FurPaw

"Every gun that is made, every warship launched,
every rocket fired, signifies in the final sense
a theft from those who hunger and are not fed,
those who are cold and are not clothed."
- Dwight D. Eisenhower
To reply, unleash the dog.
I hate prescriptive lists like this that don't give reasons.

That was my initial reaction too: "Who are you (list-maker) and why do you think you're qualified to tell me what to do?"

Bob
http://www.kanyak.com
What's wrong with cheese, ham, mushrooms, potato peels and tuna? I'm especially curious bout the cheese. We've been wrapping Cubbe's meds in cheese.

Tuna's got unfortunate levels of mercury and ham has nitrites and a lot of salt. Can't speak to the others, ... not good. There's also mold on cheese, and generally it is not a good idea to overdo dogs and dairy.

Apparently many dogs are lactose intolerant. Mine aren't, and Triss the Eternally Underweight Borzoi, who routinely skips meals no matter what she's fed, gets a bit of shredded cheese mixed with her dry food. We've never had problems with dogs and cheese.
Mustang Sally
Apparently many dogs are lactose intolerant.

This thread is the first time I've heard of that. I don't doubt you but it's not something I've run into, myself, and I've certainly been in plenty of training classes where the instructor recommended cheese (string cheese!) as a training treat.
Do you know if this is a breed thing or is more generally spread around the dog population?

Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

Prouder than ever to be a member of the reality-based community
@panix2.panix.com:
This thread is the first time I've heard of that. I don't doubt you but it's not something I've run into, myself, and I've certainly been in plenty of training classes where the instructor recommended cheese (string cheese!) as a training treat.

The bacteria that create cheese eat lactose. The same thing occurs in yogurt and other milk cultures. Lactose intolerant folks can eat cheese and yogurt, because they no longer contain lactose. There are some people who cannot eat any type of milk products, but it's not because they are lactose intolerant. Usually it's because of a serious food allergy.
I don't know whether or not dogs are lactose intolerant (my old vet said they are, but who knows?), but that they can eat cheese and yogurt is not an indicator one way or the other. As for how you'd know if a dog were lactose intolerant, you might not, unless it's fairly serious. If a dog has a high threshold for discomfort, and doesn't actually get diarrhea from it, you might never know. I'd personally not give them milk, just in case, but if you do give it to them, it's not the end of the world. It's not going to do serious or long-term harm, like feeding them onions.

Shelly
http://www.cat-sidh.net (the Mother Ship)
http://esther.cat-sidh.net (Letters to Esther)
Show more