The very young female BP we got a month or so ago hasn't settled in very well. She's very tense, has only eaten once, and has been hissing lately anytime we get our hands in the tank.
She co-habitats a 20 gal tank with the male BP, has plenty of hides and wasn't handled much at all during her first week home. Even after she ate, she continued being tense and dislikes being removed from the tank. This week she's begun hissing, and even bit me when I tried to handle her. Her behavior is the exact opposite from the male, who is very easy going and feeds well.
We try feeding her several times a week in a seperate tank, with a hide and ambiant heat in the 80's, but she just goes in the hide and curls up. The next morning, she hasn't touched the pinky we put in the hide, so we set her back in the 20 gal tank, and she curls back up with the male. She's getting more difficult to handle then better. Suggestions?
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Her behavior is the exact opposite from the male, who is very easy going and feeds well. We try feeding her several times a week in a seperate tank, with a hide and ambiant heat in the 80's, but she just goes in the hide and curls up. The next morning, she hasn't touched the pinky we put in the hide, so we set her back in the 20 gal tank, and she curls back up with the male. She's getting more difficult to handle then better. Suggestions?
for feedings, you can try a smaller shoebox type container in the dark. I've had huge ball pythons that would only eat in burlap sacks with their large rats. Even a dark pillow case could work. I would hold off on most handling until she's eating. Only handle when moving to the feeding place and back. My current ball python doesn't care for handling but tolerates it. I only handle for cage cleanings though. He curls up into a ball and hides. Good luck.
She's very tense, has only eaten once,Is not necessarily a bad thing I have had young bps fast for some time and still remain healthy. As long as his/her/weight is good. and has been hissinglately anytime we get our hands in the tank.

Take a clean washcloth or something simliar and rub your scent on it and put it in the tank.
do this every few days or so. Do not attempt to pick the bp up yet give it a good month to settle with the "security blanket" before attempting "touch therapy"
She co-habitats a 20 gal tank with the male BP, has plenty of hides andwasn't handled much at all during her first week home.

Excellent setup but give her more then just a week to settle in. Sometimes owners have to learn to be patient.
Even after she ate, she continued being tense and dislikes beingremoved from the tank.

again see above "security blanket"
Stop trying to feed her make your next attapt to feed her about 2-3 three weeks.
and when you do feed her stick her in a small paper bag with the pinky in there.
My biggest suggestion is to have patients with her and stop trying to "force" her to like you in such a small period of time. GIve her time to settle then get her to eat and then after all that she will probably be comfy with you. All of the added stress is what is keeping her from eating and getting crabby.
Post your results or you may email me with other questions concerns. ~g~
Thanks for the help.
Givin her disposition, should she remain in the same tank as the male, or does it make any difference? My guess right now, if they're tangled up together, she will probably strike when trying get the male loose from her just so we can handle him.
I would seperate them for the following reason:
If the male is on a feeding regiment, let's say once a week, then that means you have to open the tank and stress out the female once a week. This will just damage the work your doing to help her adjust. I would put her in her own tank and follow the directions in my above post.
Also how do you knwo the sexes of these bp's??
Have a good holiday.
Trying to feed her several times a week IN a different tank is the MAIN REASON why she won't feed. TOO MUCH HANDLING..she's freaking out, obvisously why she bit you.
Set her up by herself and leave her alone for a week. Don't even LOOK at her!! Next, get rid of the pinky, they do NOTHING for hatchling bp's! After a week, GENTLY (don't rattle the cage to much) drop in a HOPPER! and get away!! Since she's so freaked out it may take a couple of times. If she don't eat the first repeat process, while leaving her ALONE, until she has fed at least 4 times back to back, if she misses a week, other than from shedding, start all over. Usually, it only takes 2 weeks and bang they're going!! That's all I can tell you, it works for me and my 67 (and still hatching) '05 hatchlings. BIGGEST thing NO TOUCHY and time to get her setup on her own before it gets rough..ERIC
I'm used to saying pinky..I have been offering her f/t hoppers. I heard that you should not feed them in the same tank they live in. If handling her during the transition to another tank is the problem, I guess I'll try feeding
her in the same tank until she settles down.
Ace: Regarding the sexes, I went on the word of the people I bought them from, who sexed them while we were there. I'm not sure why they'd not be truthful about it.
Something else I'm curious about is the difference between the two snake's dispositions.
The environment for both snakes has been the same, but what about the environment they came from?
DP, the male python was a week or less old when we bought him at a herp show. He had not yet had his first meal or shed. I thought that he was coming from a very stressful environment, with all the people, vibrations and handling that was going on. We did have the regurgitation problems in the beginning (waited a week for the first feeding), but he never appeared stressed out since we've had him home, and has never shyed away from being held.
In contrast, Cleo came from a pet store that specializes in reptiles. She was already a couple months old, suppossedly "good feeding history", and appeared the least tense of the other females they showed us. The sales person says "give her a week and she'll be calm," and "she should adjust to f/t, no problem. " A month later, she's still stressed out and has eaten once.
We'll give her all th time as she needs to settle in, but I wonder if the temperment diefference has to do with the environment they came from, and the amount of time between hatching and sold to new home. There is a definate difference between the dispositions, and I'm wondering what the factors could be.
I would not be surprised if cleo was not a wild BP I would take her to a vet that specializes in herps and get her tested for parasites.