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I was struggling with depression badly,

That's a difficult situation, and you have my sympathy.
he needed more attention and excercise than I could give him, and I felt selfish for keeping him and making ... much of training. He came a looong way with his training, I just couldnt stay on top of his dominance.

What's to keep on top of?
What evaluator behaviorist? And what could s/he tell specifically?

She just said by the way she acts how hand shy and stuff she is, that someone has done a number on her.

I'm detecting male bovine excrement. My roommate has a terrier who's terrified of the oven timer. Leaves the room, hides, cowers, the whole nine yards. I've known this dog since she was 4 months old and she's never been "abused" by an oven timer, or anyone wielding an oven timer, or in the vicinity of an oven timer.
OTOH, she can be quite reactive to new experiences (sounds, sights, etc.). It's obvious to me that her reaction to the oven timer is of a piece with her other behavior, it's normal (for her), and can be mitigated if we choose to do so. As it is, we rarely use the oven timer so desensitization hasn't been tried far easier to catch the timer just before it buzzes and shut it off.
Some dogs are more sensitive the sudden movement, novel sounds, new experiences and the like and don't handle these "surprises" very well. Very often the dog can be taught to handle anxiety-provoking events in more matter-of-fact manner, but the inherent reactivity of the dog doesn't change.
For your current situation, competent, in-person, hands-on help will be far more effective than newgroup advice. But "stubborn" isn't a word I'd use to describe a dog for one thing, it implies a level of purposeful defiance. Most often, a dog described as "stubborn" is confused, or unmotivated to perform.
Also, I'm not very smart when it comes to writing and wording. Sorry in advance if I confuse you.
@q2g2000cwa.googlegroups.com:

None of that describes dominance issues. That is a very good description of a bratty dog, however. But that's a very different thing.
Again, I* know what that means, but I don't know what *you mean by that.

I was used to training previous dog who loved training sessions. He acted like a puppy when we were done all jumping and excited. Current dog just looks at me like I'm stupid.

That has nothing to do with what I just said though.
I seriously doubt that. Most well trained behaviorists wouldn't even ... or was this a dog trainerwho uses a behavioral approach.

She was with a kennel/humane society where they have training. I called them to see if they had behaviourists and they said they have trainers with expierence and training in behaviour.

So this is a trainer. Likely a new one with not so much experience.
She sounds really scared. What did your behaviorist tell you to do to help her work through that?

it was just an evaluation, she didn't get into much. Others say just don't pick her up. But how do I get her into the tub?

I recommended two books for you to get. Read them. Now. In the meantime, you really should* just avoid the areas that trigger her. The best way to do this is to *SUPERVISE and manage until you are in a better position to do some actual teaching. And dogs shouldn't need baths THAT often, so you shouldn't have to pick her up until you've desensitized her to it a LOT more.
Drop the psychic and get a trainer. Seriously.
Tara
he needed more attention and excercise than I could give him, and I felt selfish for keeping him and making ... looong way with his training, I just couldnt stay on top of his dominance. What's to keep on top of?

his dominance. I could get things under control, and get lazy about keeping me boss. I'm submissive and was letting him control me. It's just a me thing, I let people walk on me too. I know, it sucks. I'm getting stronger though. I've been seeing a counselor once a week since last may.
@q2g2000cwa.googlegroups.com:
Also, I'm not very smart when it comes to writing and wording. Sorry in advance if I confuse you.

Thanks for that clarification.
I can be far more impatient in this medium than in person, for some reason. I'll try to step back and ask more questions when reading your posts now that you've mentioned this.
Keep in mind, I might forget, though :-)
Tara
@q2g2000cwa.googlegroups.com:

Also, I'm not very smart when it comes to writing and wording. Sorry in advance if I confuse you.

Thanks for that clarification. I can be far more impatient in this medium than in person, for some reason. I'll ... more questions when reading your posts now that you've mentioned this. Keep in mind, I might forget, though :-) Tara

thanks lol
of a bratty dog, however. But that's a very different thing.
oh lol. Well then I had a very bratty dog.
with him, when I first brought him home he was jumping, trying to get your food, taking food from toddler, just madness. I worked with him, got him healthy, he no longer took our food from us and had to wait till someone actually gave it to him before eating. It's almost like I rescued from a rescue, rehabilitated a lil bit for his new home.
Like Janet said, don't let that happen. While Moogli has ... uncertain terms that such actions Were Not Allowed. *End quote*

my girl is strong willed. And even though I tell her not to dump water or foof whatever, she doesn't ... or on time out, but she still does it reguardless. I think it has something to do with being 2

I am not talking about your daughter, I am talking about your dog.

Marcel

my girl is strong willed. And even though I tell ... I think it has something to do with being 2

I am not talking about your daughter, I am talking about your dog. Marcel

oh lol. I thought telling her stepping on or messing with dog was not allowed lol. When my girl gets on couch with doggie and if doggie in bad mood and growls a lil but, I firmly say her name and shestops. Does that help? Or am I just teaching her not to growl and next time she might just nip w/o growling?
I am not talking about your daughter, I am talking about your dog. Marcel

oh lol. I thought telling her stepping on or messing with dog was not allowed lol.

Oh, you should do that as well, however I have found that it is easier to get Moogli to do (or not do) something than it is to get Emilie to do (or not do) something.
When my girl gets on couch with doggie and if doggie in bad mood and growls a lil but, I ... that help? Or am I just teaching her not to growl and next time she might just nip w/o growling?

Here I don't know. It all depends on the type of growling and is why you really need to get training for your dog. With Moogli, I know the difference between grumbly growling (Does she HAVE to get up on the sofa) which is allowed and I am very angry growling. Grumbly growling gets Moogli told to move (not get off the sofa, he knows the difference). Angry growling gets a "HEY!!" (which stops both Moogli and Emilie) and the disarming of the situation goes from there.

Over time, Moogli has figured out that Emilie is allowed to get on the sofa, and that if she wants to go somewhere, *he* has to get out of the way. At the same time, whenever Moogli is on me, napping and generally all blissed out, I will have Emilie come over and gently pet him and stroke him. This teaches her how to interact with Moogli and he gets used to the fact that she is not an evil creature.

But I am not a trainer. Do not take what I am doing above as what you should do. You need to have a professional trainer look at your situation in person and get some advice.
Marcel
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