So, I've got a new dog from the SPCA, 7 year old rott/husky mix, had a really really good home last time, was in the shelter for a month. He's great but for one issue... I can't sleep with him. Period. I have insomnia and I can't sleep a wink unless I'm in a totally dark, totally quiet room by myself.
I work at home so because of my insomnia I stay up late and sleep in late, but my dog whines and scratches at my door earlier and earlier each morning to come into my room, where he spends most of his day because I also spend most of my day here. This is completely unacceptable as a situation and I need to find a way to curb this behavior. I'd like to be able to hang out with him in my room during the day, I just have to kick him out at night. Should I start limiting the amount of time he spends in here? Should I ignore him in the morning when he scratches and whines?
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I'd like to be able to hang out with him in my room during the day, I just have to kick him out at night.

Is there a reason that he can't sleep in your bedroom at night? You wrote that you need total quiet at night - does he make noise?
FWIW, I'm a very light sleeper, but since getting dogs I've learned to get back to sleep quickly. I've looked after a French Bulldog at night a couple of times - they make continuous snuffling noises while asleep, so I've resorted to earplugs when he stays.

Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
I'd like to be able to hang out with him in my room during the day, I just have to kick him out at night.

Is there a reason that he can't sleep in your bedroom at night? You wrote that you need total quiet at night - does he make noise?

I can't do it, I've tried, having insomnia... the conditions under which I can sleep are very very picky and specific and I just can't sleep with an animal in the room.
I can't do it, I've tried, having insomnia... the conditions under which I can sleep are very very picky and specific and I just can't sleep with an animal in the room.

You're going to be in serious trouble if you ever get married.

Can you sleep without an animal in the room?
How bad is your general sleep quality? There are specific problems that can create sleep disorders and they are for the most part treatable. If you're having serious sleep issues I would strongly advise mentioning it to your doctor. Sleep is a huge quality of life issue.

Kathleen
So, I've got a new dog from the SPCA, 7 year old rott/husky mix, had a really really good home ... the amount of time he spends in here? Should I ignore him in the morning when he scratches and whines?

I have insomnia also. The best time to sleep is at night as you will be following the natural light darkness internal clock for sleep. Either change your habits or take the dog back, or let him in your room and suffer the consequences, it is not fair to get a dog and expect it to lead a life foreign to them. Like sleeping in the day and being up at night, if you had wanted that you should have gotten a Mirema dog since it is awake at nights.
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Sleep is a huge quality of life issue.

Boy, I'll say.
I've always had serious sleep problems. At six years old I had a prescription for sleeping pills, which was pretty much unheard-of in 1962. When I travel I pick hotels in which I know I can turn the fan on manually, to provide white noise to mask other noises, and I take OTC sleep medications.

However, at home I sleep with seven dogs in my bedroom, with varying numbers(*) actually on the bed with me, and it's not a sleep problem. It wasn't always thus, but I find it reassuring/calming to have the dogs around me and they've actually become a sleep aid rather than a sleep hindrance. Individual results may vary, of course, but I wouldn't surrender to the inevitability dog-induced sleeplessness without giving it a really, really good try.
(*) Having a somewhat empirical bent I've been testing the hypothesis, "You can't have too many dogs on the bed." The hypothesis turns out to be false: 6 dogs is definitely too many, 5 dogs is manageable if the space is managed well (and you can't rely on dogs to be good at jigsaw puzzles), but 4 dogs is just fine on a queen-sized bed.

Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

Prouder than ever to be a member of the reality-based community
I have insomnia also. The best time to sleep is at night as you will be following the natural light ... at night, if you had wanted that you should have gotten a Mirema dog since it is awake at nights.

Dogs are adaptable, and sleep during the day as well as at night. A normal dog spends less than 50% awake during a 24h period. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi ?
cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list uids=72649&dopt=Citation)

Adult humans usually get between 4 and 8 hours of sleep during a 24h period.

Why would Maremmas be any more nocturnal than other dogs?
I have insomnia also. The best time to sleep is ... gotten a Mirema dog since it is awake at nights.

Dogs are adaptable, and sleep during the day as well as at night. A normal dog spends less than 50% ... 4 and 8 hours of sleep during a 24h period. Why would Maremmas be any more nocturnal than other dogs?

Maremmas are nocturnal because they were bred to protect animals like sheep and chickens, and lamas recently to protect the animals form predators. Who come and eat the animals. They have reduced the sheep cut block deaths to almost zero. They work with the Border Collies who work the sheep in the day and sleep at night and the Maremmas are awake at night and keep the predators away.
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So, I've got a new dog from the SPCA, 7 ... ignore him in the morning when he scratches and whines?

I have insomnia also. The best time to sleep is at night as you will be following the natural light ... at night, if you had wanted that you should have gotten a Mirema dog since it is awake at nights.

eh, i used to work nights and sleep days. the dogs never caused a problem, even when it came time to switch back over to a "normal" schedule when i changed jobs. as long as they get enough exercise when i'm awake, they're good about settling down when i go through the "going to bed" motions.

blogging for pit bull rescue central on july 29-30. see http://shattering.org for details.
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