re: New Parakeet. page 2

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Its good to know i wont have to choose between pets. I think I am doing a good job keeping ... i need to let her be in her cage for a few weeks to get used to her new home.

Your questions have been answered twice now, perhaps thrice. Perhaps if you go back and carefully read the thread it will save time.

I'm cynical, and I hope I'm wrong, but this sure smacks of a Mama-Twit.

"So long, so long, and thanks for all the fish!"
Dave
www.davebbq.com
Its good to know i wont have to choose between pets. I think I am doing a good job keeping ... i need to let her be in her cage for a few weeks to get used to her new home.

It can be traumatic for a bird that's not comfortable around humans to be repeatedly caught and put back in it's cage against it's will. You can pick a room to let it fly in but unless it's around you a lot that won't help in getting it used to you. A major danger for a clipped bird that's not caged is getting stepped on by a human. The biggest danger for unclipped bird is flying out of a door or window, then being killed outdoors by predators. A bird that's not used to flying in a house may crash into a window or mirror and break it's neck or beak. Once a bird is familiar with glass that's very unlikely. I have seven flighted birds in my house and they all understand they can't fly though windows.
The major danger in a bathroom is that if a bird should it land in a toilet, clipped or not, it won't be able to fly wet and will drown if not rescued quickly. There are also dangerous chemicals in most bathrooms. All parrots I've met like to chew on just about everything. They test things for edibility and most chew on wood or plastic or even metal just to keep their beaks sharp. They will chew electrical cords. Other than caging, the only way to control that is to provide them with suitable things to chew on and keep everything else out of their reach.
It will take several months (up to a year) for clipped feathers to grow out. My own choice is to leave my birds fully flight worthy. When my wife first got the birds she kept them caged and clipped. The birds were miserable. Now they have more confidence and are more trusting companions if they know they can fly from danger. Flighted uncaged birds can be messy, but if you provide them places to perch that they like the messes will be confined to a few places. If (when) your bird accepts you as a friend it's favorite perch will most likely be your shoulder or a couple of feet from where you spend most of your time.
Its good to know i wont have to choose between pets. I think I am doing a good job keeping ... i need to let her be in her cage for a few weeks to get used to her new home.

If you are looking for an answer such as, "Do it on Friday at noon." you will not get it here.
This is up to you and your bird. The best keeper is one who takes his cues from the bird. Pay attention to his body language. He will tell you when it is time to take another very small step forward in the growing trust you are striving toward. Watching your tiny friend and trying to understand him can be very rewarding.
Rush it and you will set the whole thing back days/weeks/months.

Turning him lose in the bathroom may be many steps ahead of the next step. Give this bird a chance to trust you.
Pretend you have been caged by a giant and he doesn't speak your language. What would make you trust him? Food, soft communication, non-threatening movements and time. What would make you not trust him? His vicious companion pet who is 50 times your size, loud sounds, fast movements and probably the separation of you from the security of your cage.

Respect, time and consistency will get you "trust points". Go very slowly even though you want to handle him and have him love you right away.

Also, the dog is a terrier. He will never lose interest in the bird and can never be fully trusted. As the protector of both animals, it is up to you to manage their environment. I'm glad to hear that you feel you are doing that well.

Sincerely,
Joanne
If it's right for you, then it's right, . . . . . for you!!!

http://www.jobird.com
Its good to know i wont have to choose between ... a few weeks to get used to her new home.

Your questions have been answered twice now, perhaps thrice. Perhaps if you go back and carefully read the thread it ... wrong, but this sure smacks of a Mama-Twit. "So long, so long, and thanks for all the fish!" Davewww.davebbq.com

I am not trying to be repetitive but i just want to be certain that I nor my dog spooks the bird and causes some sort of permenant damage. In the mean time I will just let the bird be and settle in and not hover over him unless I am feeding or talking to him. I guess what i was asking is will I know when the bird is settled down and use to his environment, and ready to come out will he stop running from my hand, will he start eating millet from my hand? Will he move around more the he is now?
Your questions have been answered twice now, perhaps thrice. Perhaps ... long, so long, and thanks for all the fish!" Davewww.davebbq.com

I am not trying to be repetitive but i just want to be certain that I nor my dog spooks ... from my hand, will he start eating millet from my hand? Will he move around more the he is now?

~~
I'm coming into this thread rather late, however, all the advice given to you so far by everyone is excellent. Below is one of my responses to a previous poster who was in a similar situation such as yours (i.e., taming a new baby budgie). I'm repeating the same answer here as I gave to the other poster in hopes that it will help you.

My own feeling is that you're expecting too much too soon from your budgie. You stated that you've had your budgie for a very short time. This certainly isn't long enough for a baby bird to adjust to its new owners and its new surroundings. Each bird is an individual. Some birds will adjust more quickly to new situations than others. I've handraised baby budgies and parrotlets and, believe me, it takes a lot longer than a week or two. You need to have more patience.
The worst thing a new owner can do is putting your hand in the cage, chasing her, and then grabbing her. Hands look like predators especially when you're chasing her around the cage and she's running for her life. What I'd suggest you do is read as much as you can (books, websites, etc.) on taming a baby budgie. Google some terms such as "taming baby budgies", "training baby budgies", "handling budgies/parakeets", etc etc. (you get the gist of what I'm saying).

You'll get advice, tips, hints, etc. that will help you help your budgie to feel comfortable, relaxed and to start interacting with you . I also encourage you to join some mailing lists which are filled with hobbyists, breeders, and bird-loving people. These lists can be extremely helpful. Posters are friendly and encouraging. They're eager to share their personal experiences with new bird owners and are more than willing to help out with advice and recommendations on a variety of subjects such as health, nutrition, etc.

The following is from one of the digests I received from "(Email Removed)", which I feel will be helpful to you in your taming endeavours:

"{quote} File - tips.txt
Posted by: "(Email Removed)"
(Email Removed)
Wed Nov 1, 2006 6:53 am (PST)
Budgie Taming Tips by Dave Grimes
My name is Dave Grimes and I live in Cincinnati, Ohio USA. I've been asked to write about the methods that I used to tame my budgies, Sunny and Sky.
There are many different schools of thought on taming and some of what I say may work for others and some won't. I basically only had to tame Sky because Sunny had been handled since he was very young and was used to people. Sky was bought at a pet store and had had no prior experience with people that I know of.
This is how I gained his trust.
Set up your bird's cage before bringing it home. Many books give detailed info on what should be in the cage. Food, water, perches and a couple of toys, something with a bell, for example. After you've brought your bird home and put it in its cage, leave it alone for a few hours and just talk to it from across the room. Say its name, whistle to it, and even sing a song. Try to sing the same song each time you sing.

Don't put your hand in the cage except to change food and water or to clean the cage for the first week. Let the budgie get used to the people, other animals, and sounds in your house. A week is only a general guideline. The important thing is patience, patience, patience.

So, your bird is now comfortable with its new home and environment. It even is fine with you being around the cage and putting your hand in to do daily maintenance. You'll know it's ready when it doesn't show any signs of nervousness, fluttering, backing away. Now comes the really fun stuff.Start out by putting your hand in the cage a few times a day for a few minutes each time. Don't move your hand toward the bird at first. Just put your hand in the cage and leave it in one spot. Keep talking and singing softly to the bird at all times during this step. This will teach the bird that you mean it no harm. Budgies are prey animals, which means that in the wild they have many predators.

Your hand at first looks like an elephant or something huge coming to get them. This is why patience is needed. At first the bird may flutter around and act frightened. Don't give up just keep your hand in one place and talk and sing to the bird until it calms down. Keep this process up until you can put your hand in and the bird doesn't get scared. A week or more may be necessary.
Once your budgie has learned to trust your hand in its cage, you can very slooooooowly start moving your hand toward the bird as it sits on a perch. If the bird starts backing away or acting nervous stop moving your hand and leave it where the bird feels comfortable. Don't, I repeat, don't rush this step. This is the most tantalizing and frustrating part of the whole process. As before keep talking to the bird all the time. After a while if this is done correctly your bird will actually let you touch it with a finger. Sky got so comfortable with this routine that he would preen himself while I stood there talking and singing to him.
The next step is getting your bird to get on your hand or finger. What I did was to moisten my finger and put food on it. You can also use a spray of millet, which most birds can't resist. Your bird might come right away to eat or might just sit there looking at you like you're crazy or something. This took the longest for me and was very frustrating at times. Don't give up if the bird doesn't come down right away. He's still learning to trust you.
One day, out of the blue, it will happen and you won't believe the feeling of satisfaction you'll get when it happens. I just stood very still and let Sky eat. This is a big step. You might have to do it for a while before your bird will get on your hand even when you don't have food. All of this should be done in the cage during a quiet time of the day like early evening.
Final Thoughts: I hope all of this info helps. I'm just giving methods that worked for me and Sky. I do remember one day when he actually got on my hand without any food and nibbled and chattered away happily. That's when I knew I had done the right things with him.

Not all budgies will react in the same way. They have different personalities just like people do. If you have any further questions or suggestions e-mail the list and let me know. I really hope you can get something out of this and that it helps you development a great relationship with your feathered friends. {end quote}"
As far as having birds with other pets, never let your guard down. Even though your dog may appear to like your bird and want to become its friend, don't for a second believe it, especially if you have a terrier. Terriers are pretty fearless of dogs even larger than themselves and are wired to go to ground after small animals. Needless to say, terriers view tiny little flitty things like birds as prey. In addition to my birds, I have cats and I am always very vigilant on what goes on in my home in order to safeguard my birds.

I would strongly suggest keeping your bird out of range of your dog and never leaving the dog alone in the same room where the bird's cage is located. This is the perfect scenario for a disaster. I hate to sound so ominous, but it's not a pretty sight to pick up a dead mangled bird after a dog or cat gets through with it.
I hope the foregoing is helpful to you. I also hope you won't give up too quickly on taming your budgie. These things take time and, in the long run, it's worth it. Hopefully with patience and perseverance on your part, your budgie will become the pet you've always wanted. Good luck.

LindaA
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Ok so I have my second pet now, a parakeet.

All in all, I'd say that was a pretty lucky parakeet, who has an owner that's trying to do the right thing.
A lot of pet birds aren't as lucky.
Ok so I have my second pet now, a parakeet.

All in all, I'd say that was a pretty lucky parakeet, who has an owner that's trying to do the right thing. A lot of pet birds aren't as lucky.

Yes, to some degree. However, it's far better to do the homework before obtaining the bird so one doesn't have 'wing it' (pun intended) at the physical and emotional expense of a bird who is now situated in a home where the owner is garnering bits of information at a time on how to deal with it. The luckiest bird of all is one who is brought in after the informational groundwork and other preparations have already been done.

Foreknowledge is far more important than gathering information after the fact. While it's admirable that questions have been raised by the OP, prior research could have avoided problematic issues such as dog/bird interaction (preferably none at all), taming/training the bird, bird acclimating to a new environment, etc. Not to mention that diet, toys, and other pet birdkeeping concerns weren't even mentioned so not sure what is being fed the little guy (fresh veggies, greens, fruit, seed etc.?), or what he has to stimulate and entertain him. Hopefully, that's also being handled appropriately.
Still, some credit is given for not blindly going on without checking in with other bird owners who can help.
Thea
Ok so I have my second pet now, a parakeet. Just picked him up today and is in a cage ... and true methods to get me used to the bird as well as the bird used to me. Thanks, Derek

Time?
Bob