I was just wondering,
In some of the posts from Jerry, you get:-
"the trainer said that I had to intimidate my dog" or ".. my dog had to fear me more than he desired to chase a rabbit" .
Has anyone ever actually heard an approved trainer talk like that in the States?
I may be naive, but anyone talking like that would be kicked out of the training group I have visited. There is a certain amount of 'control' going on- I.e. when in the class, and instruction should be obeyed, but the trainers seemed to always manage that by perseverence and some clever body language stuff (that I wish I could emulate better!).

Just wondering if things are different over there!

Cheers, J.
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"the trainer said that I had to intimidate my dog" or ".. my dog had to fear me more than he desired to chase a rabbit" . Has anyone ever actually heard an approved trainer talk like that in the States?

Heard of it, and worse. Sometimes from trainers, sometimes from vets.

I tell my students that their dogs want them to be strong leaders, but to remember that true leadership does NOT involve strong-arm methods. (During the NILIF talk.)
Two weeks ago, in the first class, I noticed that Miss Sassy would cringe and rapidly blink her eyes when she received a verbal correction. I said to her young, well-meaning owner, "And you're going to stop slapping Sassy in the head, right?"
"I thought I was supposed to hit her," she said, meekly.

"I know. A lot of people think that, because that's how they were advised by other people. But now you know a better way to communicate with her."

This last class, I tested Sassy. No cringe/blink reflex. Not only that, but her owners (daughter & mom) were having an easier time focusing her.

PetsMart Pet Trainer
My Kids, My Students, My Life:
http://hometown.aol.com/dfrntdrums/myhomepage/index.html Last updated June 27 at 10:00 a.m.
I tell my students that their dogs want them to be strong leaders, but to remember that true leadership does NOT involve strong-arm methods.(During the NILIF talk.)

Do you recommend NILIF often? I've only recommended it 2 or 3 times and practiced it about that many but only with dogs with major behavioral issues...like dominance aggression.
This last class, I tested Sassy. No cringe/blink reflex. Not only that,but her owners (daughter & mom) were having an easier time focusing her.

She quit cringing in only 2 weeks? That's shocking. The dogs we've had in rescue who were afraid of being hit from past experience took much longer to stop reacting...some never have. Now alot of them will cringe/cower the first week in a new home because its an auto-response related to being uncertain of the new human.

Tara
That's very surprising to me, too. I've got a couple of dogs in my house that took years to get over headshyness from being hit. Cringing/cowering isn't always from being hit.
Mustang Sally
This last class, I tested Sassy. No cringe/blink reflex. Not only that, but her owners (daughter & mom) were having an easier time focusing her.

it's not a good idea to assume that a dog who flinches was necessarily hit. elliott cringes and has never* been hit. harriet *was likely hit by her former owners. when she's startled by sudden movements, she has two responses: flatten and lose bladder/bowel control or stiffen up and prepare to defend herself.

shelly (perfectly foul wench) and elliott and harriet http://home.bluemarble.net/~scouvrette
NILIF talk.)

I have had TOO MANY dogs come to me that had their owners doing the NILIF. : (

They definitely screwed up the Chessies!
Do you recommend NILIF often? I've only recommended it 2 or 3 times and practiced it about that many but only with dogs with major behavioral issues...like dominance aggression.

I have NEVER suggested it, as I don't think it is needed.

I like negotiating with my guys and even the nastiest ones come around with kindness and patience and consistency and rules.
Of course I have always aid I like to work with BIG BULLY Brown Dogs

They are my favourite. : )
Paulette~
to

You're right. Lots of people think though if a dog is head shy they were hit.

It can also be because the dog was not socialized, had ear problems,many reasons.
Paulette~
Do you recommend NILIF often?

For every dog in my class, yes.
I recommend this:
http://k9deb.com/nilif.htm
I consider it one of the most "mild" applications of NILIF that I've found. Concise, easy to understand, seems to work well in establishing the humans as the pack leaders.
Most of my students are spoiled brats. :}
She quit cringing in only 2 weeks? That's shocking.

Yea, I was surprised. Seemed quick to me, too.
PetsMart Pet Trainer
My Kids, My Students, My Life:
http://hometown.aol.com/dfrntdrums/myhomepage/index.html Last updated June 27 at 10:00 a.m.
Cringing/cowering isn't always from being hit.

It was the eye-blinking that gave it away. I immediately assumed that her owner gave her light slaps on the nose or head. I was right.

PetsMart Pet Trainer
My Kids, My Students, My Life:
http://hometown.aol.com/dfrntdrums/myhomepage/index.html Last updated June 27 at 10:00 a.m.
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