We have two dogs, a female chow mix (10 yr. old) and a male lab mix (4 yr. old). The female chow had obedience class when we got her at 6 mo. old. Believe it or not, she was first in her class. She even got a trophy. The lab was a puppy when we rescued him, but very temid and has done well without classes.
Our problem is, the chow is very obstinate when walking on a leash. The dogs have a back yard, but my husband and I walk them in the evenings and many mornings my husband will take them for a walk. The chow is getting up in age and does have some arthritis but does well on medication. However, since she is older, we understand the need to walk slower with her. However her walks are getting more frustrateed. A walk consists of walking, sniffing and sitting when she see's she's turning for home. She does better when starting out, it's when we turn to come home or if we are at the park and the path is in the home stretch, she becomes very obstinate.
My husband has always gotten frustrated w/the chow even after she graduated as a puppy because it was a fight to keep her from stopping and sniffing on her walks. We would walk her in the middle of the road but it was a constant fight to keep her there. She wants to go in her own direction and becomes down right obstinate. Yanking her chain and telling her no, makes it worse and it's just a constant fight.

She decided at some point to simply stop and lay down to get her way. She ways 55 lbs. We all have to stop and wait a minute or two before she will get back up and the tug starts up again. I might add when she accidently gets loose at home, she bolts like she is the fastest dog in the neighborhood. She can sometime be difficult to catch and we are in the car!
This morning, My husband was out walking them both in our neighborhood. When the chow realizes she was headed back in the direction of home, she decides to stop and lay down. A man in our neighborhood has witnessed this on several occasions and today walked over to see if he could help. My husband (alone with both dogs) told him of his frustration and the man offered to hold the leash while my husband walked home to get the car. As soon as the chow saw my husband was leaving her, she jumped to her feet and followed with the neighbor holding on to her leash. Long story short, the neighbor walked her the rest of the way home with no problems and I might add at a fast pace.
Short of ever taking this dog out again for a walk, we do not know what to do. She's not going very far and we have learned that it is not that she's hurting or too tired. She just doesn't want to end her walk when she see's she's headed homeward. She loves her walk but it's to the point we don't want to go through the frustration of taking her. Help!

TIA,
Phyllis
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Short of ever taking this dog out again for a walk, we do not know what to do. She's not ... walk but it's to the point we don't want to go through the frustration of taking her. Help! TIA, Phyllis

She obviously loves her walks, so I think it would be awful for her if you stopped.
Why not take her out for different walks, pre planned and sometimes involving the car, so she goes to lots of different places and trying to make these walks 'round trips' so you start out from one direction and complete a circle - that way, she'll never know when her walk is coming to an end.
Different walks will be much more interesting and fun for you to.

Diana

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This morning, My husband was out walking them both in our neighborhood. When the chow realizes she was headed back ... neighbor walked her the rest of the way home with no problems and I might add at a fast pace.

Boy, does she have you trained. :}
Your neighbor provided you with a possible solution. Walk her on a long leash. When she doesn't want to go back home, ignore her and pretend to walk home without her (hanging onto that leash, which should be at least as long as the distance you have to walk before she gets up and follows you).

You won't get anywhere tugging on the leash. That doesn't do anything but cause an obstinate dog to become more obstinate. Carry her favorite treats, and reward her for walking with you.
At her age, I'd walk at her pace - if that means stopping and smelling the roses every 2 feet, so be it. She doesn't need the walk for exercise as much as she needs it for mental stimulation. The four year old lab needs more than this for exercise (i.e., running), but the 10 year old chow can mosey.

When you want her to stop sniffing and walk, tell her "leave it." Did you learn that in obedience class? If not, post and I (and probably several others) will give you instructions on how to do it.

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She decided at some point to simply stop and lay down to get her way. She ways 55 lbs. We all have to stop and wait a minute or two before she will get back up and the tug starts up again.

Stop tugging, stop stopping, stop coaxing, Hold the leash and walk. Don't look back. Just do it. She'll figure out that she's not winning this particularly obnoxious game and get her butt of the road. But only if you don't coddle her.
Janet Boss
http://bestfriendsdogobedience.com /
How I wish it was easy as that! When my husband has them both, the lab leads and the chow use to follow (last of course). Now she just rears her head back and pulls the train back when she wants to smell or stop. Just being obstinate. The more we jerk her chain and tell her no the more obstinate she becomes. She simply refuses to obey. She will really stand her ground.
We live in a neighborhood that the knows extremely well. There is no fooling her. We also drive them frequently to a small park nearby that has a walking path. It's nice and shaded and just long enough for her before she tires. We also bring them to a nearby school that is fenced and we let them roam without their leash and that really is the ideal way. However, it's not often we can go there because kids are having ball practice and if it's wet, we will walk on the road in the neighborhood. We have a variety of places and routes. The highlight of their day is walking and it's really something we all enjoy. It's just the chow has become increasingly incouragable.
At times we do simply drop the leash and then she will follow but sometimes she will also start to bolt in her own direction.
My husband is the one who took the obedience class with her and she was taught to walk on the left, at our pace and if she starts to go her own way, we pull her back yanking her chain. However, the two dogs are more often together with my husband and while the lab and dad are going in the right direction, the chow starts pulling away and constantly having to get yanked back on course. For some reason she has decided to fight this and its becomes a tug.
At times we do simply drop the leash and then she will follow but sometimes she will also start to bolt in her own direction.

Which is why you need a long leash.
My husband is the one who took the obedience class with her and she was taught to walk on the left, at our pace and if she starts to go her own way, we pull her back yanking her chain.

That's not the right technique to use. Obviously, as it doesn't work.
For some reason she has decided to fight this and its becomes a tug.

And that's why.
I would suggest walking her by herself, without the lab. Is there a treat she can't resist? Hot dogs, string cheese, peanut butter? Hold it in your left hand, about where you want the dog's head. Give her only enough leash to walk beside you without the leash getting taut. Talk to her, give her little nibbles at it, encourage her to walk beside you because it's fun, interesting and rewarding to do so.
Take the power struggle out of it.
Canine Action Dog Trainer
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At this point I don't want to reward her with treats on walks. The lab has severe food allergies and we have had to eliminate all treats for him. We slip her treats when he isn't around.
We both work but one of us tries to give them a walk in the evenings. Many nights I work late and my husband brings them alone, sometimes vise versa. We do, however, walk together on the weekends and it's easier. I take the fast dog and my hubby takes the slow dog.
We don't want to use a longer lead for her because she will walk into the neighbor's yards which is a big no, no. We try to keep them in the middle of the road as we walk to keep them from stopping and sniffing. However, we have had to slow our pace for her due to her age and physical ailments.

I'm afraid the solution may be that we will have to split and walk them separately. Perhaps try the treat reward you suggest with her and see how that goes.
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