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@attbi s21: Those books are incredible..and the reasons I slogged through Cryptonomicon without reward so many times. I still think Snow Crash is one of the more humerous, and prophetic works of fiction of our time.

Agreed. It's the book that predicted most of the next 10 years. Especially incredible considering it was written in 1992. On Cryptonomicon, I simply skipped over some of the "I can't understand this part" sections, and made it through.
It was a tossup between a game-theoretic examination of the toilet seat problem and the UnSuggester, which takes the title ... stay away from "The Devil Wears Prada," whcih is something I had kind of planned to do, anyway. http://www.librarything.com/unsuggester

great link. As for the Husky-cam, I finally got it working but no dogs are out Emotion: sad
I'll leave it up so I can hopefully catch some later.
Not az lot of subtlety there though. Seems like you either fall into the Christian camp, or the sci-fi/fiction camp. Or maybe my selections were so one sided that's all I got.

I put in To Kill A Mockingbird and got a bunch of religious stuff not to read. I don't know what Mockingbird has in it that would make it anti-religious. I think they must assume that people who read literature don't read religion and vice-versa. I find both interesting. I love the books by a former monk who is now a psychologist that I have read. I can't for the life of me remember his name, but I'm sure it will come to me when I am no longer trying to think of it and then I will go crazy wondering why I was trying to remember his name. Maybe they have a recommended reading list for the memory impaired in there somewhere!

Paula
"Anyway, other people are weird, but sometimes they have candy, so it's best to try to get along with them." Joe Bay
@attbi s21: Those books are incredible..and the reasons I slogged ... more humerous, and prophetic works of fiction of our time.

Agreed. It's the book that predicted most of the next 10 years. Especially incredible considering it was written in 1992.

Yup. I think I read it in 94 and couldn't believe what I was reading. It was so over the top..and yet eerily accurate.
On Cryptonomicon, I simply skipped over some of the "I can't understand this part" sections, and made it through.

Ahh. I'll have to try this method on my next attempt. I would have to reread a page 5 times (which is major, given that the book is over
900 pages to begin with) in order to just basically grasp a lot of thetechnical language he was using. I'd focus so hard on that, that I would lose the plot thread and have to then backtrack a few pages to remember what the context was. I love the guy, but that was just getting ridiculous. I assumed the technical stuff was critical to the plot..if its not, I won't worry about it all next time and just speed read through those parts. Yay!
Tara
I assumed the technical stuff was critical to the plot..if its not, I won't worry about it all next time and just speed read through those parts. Yay!

I think it ups the enjoyment level, but I don't think it's critical to the plot. But I think that along with his sense of humor the ease/skill with which he slides the techie stuff in there is one of the things that make him such an enjoyable writer. I thought the Baroque cycle was great because he did that across a bunch of disciplines. Well, because the writing was good, too, but he's a very facile nerd.

Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

Prouder than ever to be a member of the reality-based community
I assumed the technical stuff was critical to the plot..if ... next time and just speed read through those parts. Yay!

I think it ups the enjoyment level, but I don't think it's critical to the plot. But I think that ... did that across a bunch of disciplines. Well, because the writing was good, too, but he's a very facile nerd.

And I could.not.get.through the Baroque stuff. The first one was just interminally boring as far as I was concerned. I heard the next two were better but since I couldn't get through the first one I wasn't going to try. I don't like to have to work so damn hard to like what I'm reading, which is why I like light fiction...
I tend to really dislike science fiction but like Neal Stephenson quite a bit.

I like him lots. All in all, I like credible fiction of many sorts, emphasis emphasised.

Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
some unattractive reading habits (says Melinda, who has some unattractive reading habits).

Ditto. I haven't had time to read anything that can be considered 'deep'. Hell, these days, I'm lucky to get around to the Comic pages in The Post.[/nq]These days, I only read books to Soren at bedtime / in-between homework efforts (to de-stress and/or reward after a good effort). It's mostly Juvenile / Young Adult fantasy - we started with Harry Potter long ago and have re-read them a number of times. We've done the Artemis Fowl series (and other books by Eoin Colfer), they are short but very funny. We read the Golden Compass and it's sequels, and just finished the final book of the Bartimaus Trilogy (Jonathon Stroud) which we loved.

We enjoyed "Holes" by Louis Sacher and I'm in a search for other stuff by that author, hoping that his other works will be as good. I'm trying to get a copy of Howls Moving Castle. In non-fantasy, we read "Hatchet" by Gary Paulson but the protagonist was too grim/glum for Soren's taste. Dave and Soren have been working through the "Redwall" Series. In non-fiction, Soren and I like adventure - we've started on "Worldwalk" by Steven Newman which like the title implies is about a guy who walks around the world.

For Soren it's important that there is some humor and the story isn't scary/depressing. I plan to read the Gary Paulsen book where he does the Ididarod - Winterdance?

The only time I read books for myself is when I'm traveling/visiting my ILs. I maintain a list of potential reading material that I save for situations like this. This list includes some dog books (the next Patricia McConnell book - I can't remember the name) and some fiction. I use to have patience for difficult books but now if a story can't draw me in within a 25-100 pages (some days I'm more determined), I toss it aside.

If anyone has any suggestions, especially books for Soren, I'd love to hear of them.
Chris and the smoothies,
Pablo and Lucy-Goose
These days, I only read books to Soren at bedtime / in-between homework efforts (to de-stress and/or reward after a good effort). It's mostly Juvenile / Young Adult fantasy - we started with Harry Potter long ago and have re-read them a number of times.

I LOVED the Harry Potter books. I have all of them. And you know there's no one in my household who is in the target audience for them. I read the first one just to see what the big deal was and I quickly understood why the kids loved it.
If anyone has any suggestions, especially books for Soren, I'd love to hear of them.

I have no idea if you can still get them anyplace now but Brandy loved the whole Oz series of books. There were actually fourteen books in the L. Frank Baum series. We somehow have five of them. They show dates of around
1910 - 1913 so probably they don't exist in any semi-current form.

When I was pregnant - which was clearly a lifetime ago - a friend was losing his battle with cancer. He had saved a lot of his childhood books and gave them to me for the future generation. I can't remember now but I suspect these were part of that collection.
I'll look around here and see if I can find anything else in that vein.

Judy
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