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I appreciate your candor and info, Julian - I need facts so I can truly be prepared and do what's right for these critters!
I admit my stupidity has put me in a precarious situation, but I fully intend to make the best of it (i.e., I'm not going to give up!) I had already planned on putting them in their own habitats as they grew - mostly for their growing room but also for the boys to have their own iguana in their own room - but I had not thought of the agressive behavior between males. I've looked at those little dots on their legs, and they are still rather small... I'm pretty sure one is a male, but the other two's gender is still up in the air!
I had talked to two different iguana owners beforehand, and the only negative I heard was that iguanas slap you with their tail if you make them mad / startle them... I wasn't concerned about food availability here because I was told they eat fresh veggies (I had to give up my ball python when I moved here as there was nowhere to get mice). Your food info helpful, VTW...
I'm almost afraid to ask (and Rubystars, can you respond to this too?) - but why do you think iguanas are a bad idea for a pet? Julian, what kind of damage are you referring to - the damage they do to each other or something else?
~Julie
Julie, i will reply later in more detail when i can, dont take it personally, i have done the same before, but not with Igs, you wont be the last, but just think how much room you will need.
The pores, are not a great way to sex on really young animals, i have been whipped int he face, the teeth will slice thru skin and the claws will take your eye out rip your ear and as my neck and arms show, rip the skin to srheds..2 of mine are ame enough to be stroked, sit on my shoulder and go out shopping with me inthe summer, the other 2 are worse than dobermans, be prepard for a lot of 1-1 handling, try handfeeding to gain confidence.

I belive the person in the shop wanted to make money not give actual facts, i see this all the time, GOOD pet shops dont sell Igs.

If you ever want advice, but not here, email me direct, i cant help you on US terms for food etc, or brands, they differ here
I'm almost afraid to ask (and Rubystars, can you respond to this too?) - but why do you think iguanas ... Julian, what kind of damage are you referring to - the damage they do to each other or something else?

A tamed iguana requires working every single day with the lizard to first tame it and then to keep it tame. Even then they are sometimes subject to aggressive behavior, especially during breeding season. Tame male iguanas may even become aggressive towards human females who are menstruating. Believe it or not, they pick up on the pheremones and respond.
An untame iguana will tail-whip, scratch and bite. All of these can cause moderate to serious injuries to humans. Think cuts, scratches, bruises, and missing fingers in extreme cases.
Iguanas can make mellow pets, but it requires lots of hard work.

As for your questions about care, take Luke's advice and spend lots of time at anapsid.org. Melissa has a wealth of information there about topics from diet to lighting to medical care. There is some controversy, however, regarding her theories on aggression in iguanas. Please take a look at this site:
http://www.todaysplanet.com/pg/beta/lizardlover/page6.htm

Henry has some great pictures there of the type of damage that adult iguanas can inflict.
I wish you luck with your new wards, and I commend you for trying to do your best with a bad situation. I know you plan on keeping all 3 igs, but it's never a bad idea to have a contingency plan. Start thinking now about where you might be able to place these animals should you not be able to handle all 3, and remember that young and tame iguanas are much easier to find homes for. You might also talk to your boys about everything you've learned and convince them that it would be a good idea to return 2 of the lizards to the store right now, before they get too attached.

Julian - I believe you showed us once a picture of the room that you keep your adult igs in. I seem to remember the walls being completely trashed. Maybe you could post that again in the binaries group?
-Z
I had talked to two different iguana owners beforehand, and the only negative I heard was that iguanas slap you with their tail if you make them mad / startle them.[/nq]Iguanas are large, powerful lizards. They are made to climb. Unlike primates, which climb by grabbing onto branches, iguanas climb by sinking their large, sharp claws into wood. The claws sink into human skin and flesh just as well. If an iguana tries to climb you, or just keep its balance while you are holding it, you can suffer shallow lacerations from the claws (clothing helps a lot). If you try to restrain a nervous iguana, it will try to escape by finding purchase with it's claws and pushing off.

What it usually finds purchase on is your arms. When it pushes off, it goes nowhere since you are holding it, and it drags its claws through your skin. This causes even more lacerations, although they are usually shallow. Again, clothing helps, in the form of long sleeved shirts, jackets, or sweaters in this case.

If you approach a frightened iguana, it will, as you mentioned, hit you with its tail as it tries to get you to keep your distance. Large iguanas can leave cuts and welts with their tail, which is something like a combination between a club and a whip.
If you grab a terrified iguana, it will likely try to defend itself by biting you. They have sharp teeth, powerful jaws, and can leave deep, jagged, bleeding wounds. The bites, as with the bites of any animal, can be contaminated with oral bacteria leading to infection. Normal clothing does not offer much protection, although leather jackets or gloves will probably protect you.
Adult male iguanas will enter rut for part of the year. When in rut, they have been known to attack humans without provocation, usually by biting with the intent to cause as much damage as possible. These attacks often occur without warning. This hormonal agression is probably the biggest drawback to owning a male iguana, since even the tamest iguana can turn into a fighting terror. Tame females, at least, can usually be trusted.
Luke
I appreciate your candor and info, Julian - I need facts so I can truly be prepared and do what's ... Julian, what kind of damage are you referring to - the damage they do to each other orsomething else? ~Julie

When they're adults, they'll need room-sized enclosures. They'll be 6 feet long from nose to tip of tail. Males in breeding season can be aggressive not only to each other but also to owners. Your kids may have their own iguanas in their own rooms but the iguanas will eventually need their own rooms unless you plan to have an enclosure constructed for them at your own expense. I read a news article a couple of years ago about a lady who got her finger bitten off by a pet iguana trying to bathe it. They need a diverse diet, the right temps, etc.
This page has some pictures of nasty wounds given to people by their pet iguanas:
http://www.todaysplanet.com/pg/beta/lizardlover/page6.htm

Don't forget to read that anapsid.org site. That is supposed to have the best info on feeding iguanas.
-Rubystars
As a lover of Iggs for over 11 years I have to say narrow down to just a single Igg unless youhave a wealth of time to dedicate to themthe first thing you need to do if you must keep them all is seperate them you will never break them out of the tail whiping habit if they are housed together also consider this in January I bought a baby just like yours she was about 16 inches long from tip of nose to tip of tail with proper space and a good diet she is allready nearly 32 inches long and I havent quite had her a year. Dispite some coments you have seen from others in this news group Iggs make wonderfull pets but they realy do need to be a part of your life not like fish in a tank that are happy with having food thrown at them a couple times a week and the gravel and glass cleaned every now and again It took me 9 monthes to tame my new baby Igg .but now she is doing great hasn't tryed to whip me when I go to get her in several weeks now .

But again 9 monthes of handling her evry day several times a day even if she didn't want to be bothered..you can see my old Iggy who passed away just over a year ago at 11 years of age and allso our young Igg at mysite..
http://mysite.verizon.net/vze3z3sp /
Charlieigguy
"Charle Anctil" wrote in message
Dispite some coments you have seen from others in this news group Iggs make wonderfull pets

I just meant they would make a bad pet for someone like me. And I think they're not good for most people either because of all the care they need and their enormous size.
-Rubystars
Thank you all for some excellent advice, insight, and suggestions! I've showed them the web page with pictures of the mating bites that you guys posted, which is a nice reality check!
I have actually been working on the boys about taking two back (as suggested by Z), and we'll do that tomorrow. Besides avoiding problems that could occur from possibly having more than one male, we could all concentrate on spending time with the one and making it a part of the family.

Thank you all for taking the time to help me with this! I'll be re-reading the posts and more fully checking out the links!
Sincerely,
~Julie
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