1 2 3 4  6 7 » 22
I did until this morning - after I took the picture I read where the iguanas tend to stay on them and "bake". I sacrified a waterproof heating pad until I get to the pet store tomorrow. I had bought a 100W UV bulb and caged clamp-on lamp, but within 30 minutes of plugging it in, the bulb blew - the glass is separated from the screw-on part (didn't break, just came apart), so I can't get it out to replace it. I have some 100W halogen bulbs in another clamp-on lamp that I use for taking photos of my beads - can I use them instead of the heating pad?
~J
I guess this is a little divergent from the topic at hand, but I'm wondering, to those who are able to let your pet herps run loose around the house and sleep with you and whatnot, how do you deal with the poo? Are your herps "potty trained,"? (for lack of a better term) If so, how did you manage that?I have always wanted to let susie, my amboina box turtle, roam around free at least occasionally, but she gives no warning when she is about to ...go. There is no discernable pattern to her movements as far as I can tell. After cleaning up a number of very large stinky messes when we've brought her out of her enclosure, we now take precautions for instance, she is not generally out of her enclosure without some kind of towel beneath her anymore, but while there are certainly worse sacrifices, she seems to really enjoy poking around in nooks and crannies of the house and we really want to let her without having to interrupt her explorations every time she approaches the edge of her protective towel.

She doesn't do it every time, and it's fun to bring her to bed and fall asleep together, which has happened without incident in the past. ..but man! Her poo is not something you want to be cleaning out of your bed! She even seems kind of embarrassed about it when it happens. I might be projecting.
So, anyway, when I hear about herps like Charlie's Iggy, it makes me want to know what your secret is. Or whether there even is a secret, or if some animals just naturally tend to deposit there *** in a designated area. Or otherwise, how you manage to deal with all the droppings. I appreciate your input.
Thanks!
Jana
"Rubystars" (Email Removed) ha scritto nel messaggio

I started with an impulse purchase. I knew nothing about reptiles when I bought my first snake. Once home I read and read and read up on Internet and so the snake was doing fine (and is still). I prefer people reading up after very much to people reading up never (as long as the animal thrives it's ok). Better late than never.
Anna
I've looked at those little dots on their legs, and they are still
rather small... I'm pretty sure one is a male, but the other two's gender is still up in the air!

Hi Julie,
You will be unable to accurately sex your Igs until they are well into their second year.
The links NJM gave you are a good start.
My first reaction to your post was to send back at least two of the three Iglets. Having one is a major commitment, never mind three and the complications that will arise.
colleen-
I guess this is a little divergent from the topic at hand, but I'm wondering, to those who are able ... the poo? Are your herps "potty trained,"? (for lack of a better term) If so, how did you manage that?

My fellow (full grown male) is paper trained. Iguana's are very habitual. When free roaming he liked going in the same place/time daily in my living room. I started placing newspaper in that spot, and he'd go on it. After a few weeks of doing this, I'd move the papaer to a different spot for him to find. He began to associate the paper as his pooping location.
Of course, during mating season (he's just begun now)..he has his own ideas!!! sigh
colleen-
Julie,
I advise you to read Lukes post carefully. And then consider how much interaction you want your sons to have with these Igs.

I have a full grown male, completely tame. Even during the dreaded mating season he is easy for ME to handle. No one else though. Just me. He is full of attitude and likes to threaten any male humans that approach him. All bluff I think, but one never knows for sure. They are animals afterall, and can be unpredictable.
To get my Ig so tame, I have spent a minumum of two hours/day handling him, cleaning his enclosure, handfeeding and socializing him. Time is something else to consider.
colleen-
Hi Jana I learned early on with my first Igg that they are a creature of habitmy first one would only poo in the dirt in the bottom of a large house plant as it got larger I noticed that if it even remotely thought it needed to go it would the second I would but her in the shower for her bathat that point I started giving her shower in the morning and again late afternoon and evening this ended having to clean it from the plant pot as time went on it seamed as though she would give a certaine look when she needed her shower..
My new Igg that we will have had for a year just after Christmas would climb out in the limb of her tree to poo yuk we put a small plastic tub with a little water so it would not dry on it and shee would poo into it again with time she has learned to wait for her shower and seldom poos in the plastic tub any more .
my first igg slept along side me in the bed for around 9 years all year round and the only time she had a accident was the week she passed on she was very sick and could no longer climb off of the bed dont know if this is ofany help to you with with your turrtle but I'm sure by closely watching for habit and manipulating feeding times you could have more roaming time..
Charlieigguy
I guess this is a little divergent from the topic at hand, but I'm wondering, to those who are able ... in a designated area.Or otherwise, how you manage to deal with all the droppings. I appreciate your input. Thanks! Jana

My first Ig wa free to roam the living room, had his area, basking light, UV, in the warm sun would move into the window and look at the people walk by, when he wanted a crap he would walk to the other side of the room, use the cat litter tray and walk back, when i was eating he would eat off my plate..forgot to mention the Alsation i had at the time loved to eat Ig crap!
I've looked at those little dots on their legs, and they are still

rather small... I'm pretty sure one is a male, but the other two'sgender is still up in the air!

Hi Julie, You will be unable to accurately sex your Igs until they are well into their second year. The ... of the three Iglets. Having one is a major commitment, never mind three and the complications that will arise. colleen-

Large jowels can be a good sign, along with the preformal pores but i agree at such a young sign you cant tell, i have one here, i think its a female, but then i have seen males look feminin.
Show more