Hello
I have a peach faced love bird. She is on a seed diet and I give her a calcium supplement (Prime) since in the past, she was unable to lay her eggs due to the calcium deficiency in her diet. (She is alone in her cage)

Lately, she has been laying eggs every 2 to 3 days. I would like to know whether my giving her the calicum supplement is too much calcium for her and this could be one of the reasons why she is laying eggs so often. Should I take her to the vet in order to stop her from laying the eggs?

Thank you
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How soon after you Lovebird is laying her eggs are you pulling the eggs from the cage? You should leave the eggs in the cage for a couple of days. Particularly IF you are pulling them as soon as she lays. That could be one of the reasons that she is laying all the time.
Also if she has a nest box, or other environmental stimuli that would encourage her to lay.
Herman
Hello I have a peach faced love bird. She is on a seed diet and I give her acalcium supplement ... often. ShouldI take her to the vet in order to stop her from laying the eggs? Thank you BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE

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I have to agree with you Herman, when we had both of our Lovie's, they'd both lay eggs so we had to remove ANYTHING that might have stimulated egg laying, including papertowel, any type of bedding material even sandpaper for a few days once (when they'd shred it for nesting material, just had a good layer of grit on the cage bottom) Our Vet back then suggested leaving the eggs for upto 10-14 days to stop egg laying, at one stage they had over
25 eggs between them, but they did stop laying, although they spent a coupleof weeks on min/vit boosters after.
But PLEASE take her to the Vet, an Avian Vet if you can find one, it's always better to err on the side of caution. Prevention is better than cure -)
Ian
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Ian,
Exactly, and this is the type of advise that is NOT species specific. It pertains to ALL birds.
Herman
and

Should

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I have to agree with you Herman, when we had both of our Lovie's, they'd both lay eggs so we ... days once (when they'd shred it for nesting material, just had a good layer of grit on the cage bottom)

Grit. Thats a good idea. Not.
Our Vet back then suggested leaving the eggs for upto 10-14 days to stop egg laying, at one stage they hadover

Eggs should be left until the hen loses interest in them - however brief or long it takes.
25 eggs between them, but they did stop laying, although they spent acouple of weeks on min/vit boosters after. But ... you can find one, it's always better to err on the side of caution. Prevention is better thancure :-) Ian

Take her to the vet only if it's the simplest solution to the problem. Isn't that right cowboy? It's exactly what your arguement was in another thread.

* Steve *
Well grit was what the Vet at the time suggested, any form of paper/sandpaper would be instantly shredded to nesting material. Fortunately the grit was only necessary for few days as it's not something that would have made an ideal long-term droppings catcher.
They both lost interest in the eggs eventually, we'd remove any that they discarded.
Taking them to the vet wasn't the easiest solution by a long way, we spoke to him first several times and he was worried in case of egg-binding after they'd laid so many. When we did take them, it was a nightmare getting them out of their cage and they both fought madly as expected with 2 hens nesting, never mind the stress it caused both of them. But, YES I'm glad we did take them.. as I said better to err on the side of caution. However I'm not totally sure if your reply was to me or to Herman?? Ian
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No, Steve that is NOT what I was trying to say.
All I was trying to say was that in trying to determine what is causing a particular behavior that we shouldn't overlook something that is right under our noses.
And wholeheartedly support and am in favor of the well bird check-up as well as routine check-ups so that our feathered children remain healthy.

Herman

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BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE Hash: SHA1 No, Steve that is NOT what I was trying to say. All I was ... am in favor of the well bird check-up aswell as routine check-ups so that our feathered children remain healthy. Herman

But you have not said that you are in favor of taking a bird to the vet if something is obviously wrong. You to spend the money on a vet simply because it may not be necessary. If something is overlooked, vet care shouldn't be that thing. Taking a pet to the vet needs to be done in conjunction with looking at envirnmental causes. Taking a pet to the vet only after exhausting envirnmental possibilties is an out right foolish idea.
You said "But how would you feel IF someone spent hundreds IF not thousands of dollars on tests and what not only to discover that it WAS either a lack of toys, human contact or an enviromental cause that was causing the feather plucking???"
Do you really think that someone should feel badly or even guilty because someone else cared enough for their pet to spend a lot of money on vet care?

* Steve *
No, Steve that is NOT what I was trying to say.

So try harder next time.

* Steve *
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