Do you think the vets who currently recommend pellets would continue to recommend that same pellet if there were no personal profit motive?

My argument for yes:
1. The vet has a general awakening of the value of the ingredients in thispellet compared to the awareness of a general nutritional value decline and toxic incline of substances in real food.
2. The vet has a belief that most clients don't understand nutrition or areunwilling to provide the effort necessary to be sure the bird's diet is rounded enough to include sufficient amounts of all nutrients necessary to promote good health.
My argument for no:
1. The vet was only motivated by profit to recommend these pellets anddoesn't really give a rip about the health of the bird. In fact, the sicker the bird becomes, the more money there is in it for the vet.

Personally, I use a combination of Roudybush, Large Hookbill Safflower Mix and real food. I rotate by day-of-the-week, and everyone is thrilled when it's seed day, or pellet day or "good food" day. I believe they can become bored with the same old menu day after day and they are as excited about each of the three when it rotates back around.
I know in humans, variety is the insurance that better nutrition will be achieved. I also believe that supplementation is necessary because the ground doesn't grow what it did a century ago. Meat sources have been artificially stimulated to grow because of the profit incentive in that industry, so careful selection of meat protein is the best I can do short of raising my own. And that would be laughable because we'd just end up with a new collection of pets.
So, what do you think?

Sincerely,
Joanne
If it's right for you, then it's right, . . . . . for you!!!

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Do you think the vets who currently recommend pellets would continue to recommend that same pellet if there were no personal profit motive?

I only know what my Vet does. She recommends them, sells Harrison's. My Macaw was weaned onto Zupreem, she's fine with that. She has never tried to tell us "her" brand was better, she was just as happy with what he was eating pellets.

The problem with the gene pool is that there is no lifeguard.
Our Mitred and Sun Conures get a mix of Zupreem (regular and fruit blend), Roudybush, Volkman Conure seed mix, and millet spray. They also get whatever they can steal of my plate at supper, not to mention all kinds of other healthy foods. Our Sun Conure, Skipper, will just about kill for Cheerios.
So, what do you think?

What one feeds their pets is usually an extension of how they view life for themself. There are only three basic groups:
1) The live-to-be-100-with-perfect-teeth group
2) The everything-in-moderation group
3) The die-young-and-leave-a-good-looking-corpse group

We're somewhere between 2 and 3, and feed our birds accordingly. Eating is one of life's most basic pleasures and we can't imagine subjecting any living creature to a diet of nothing but dried pellets. Obviously basic nutrition is required, but beyond that, our birds enjoy the same range of sometimes-horrible food that we do.

As for vets, we learned a long time ago most of them will hawk the products of whichever pellet manufacturer cuts them the best kickback deal.
I have 2 pairs of linnies and I dont feed them with pellets. I prepare a mix of veggies, fruits, beans and grains. They love it and they have the oportunity to choose what they like in the mix according to their like. Only in the eveinings i offer a seed mix.
So far, i got babies with better appeareance than the parents!

Paulo
Do you think the vets who currently recommend pellets would continue to recommend that same pellet if there were no ... laughable because we'd just end up with a new collection of pets. So, what do you think? Sincerely, Joanne

NO to pellets.
Do you think the vets who currently recommend pellets would ... of pets. So, what do you think? Sincerely, Joanne

NO to pellets.

You missed the question. I'd love to hear your answer to the question I posed in the first paragraph.

Sincerely,
Joanne
If it's right for you, then it's right, . . . . . for you!!!

Play - http://www.jobird.com
Pay for Play - http://www.jobird.com/refund.htm
Looking for Love? - http://www.jobird.com/hearts.htm Garden Kinder CDs
http://www.jobird.com/cd/gardenkinderhome.html
You missed the question. I'd love to hear your answer to the question I posed in the first paragraph. Sincerely, Joanne

Pellets haven't been around long enough to prove they are good for birds. They are un-natural and are just a money spinner for producers and sellers. What were birds fed before pellets came along and how did they manage to breed so successfully and how did they manage to live so long? There is nothing wrong with a seed based diet. My birds are fed a natural diet of mixed seeds and nuts, soaked seed, sprouted seeds and pulses, fruit and vegetables. The only time I have to visit my vet is for worming liquid and ivermectin for my birds in outside aviaries.
You missed the question. I'd love to hear your answer to the question I posed in the first paragraph. Sincerely, Joanne

Pellets haven't been around long enough to prove they are good for birds. They are un-natural and are just a ... only time I have to visit my vet is for worming liquid and ivermectin for my birds in outside aviaries.

Some of what you say is true, but here's the question:

Do you think the vets who currently recommend pellets would continue to recommend that same pellet if there were no personal profit motive?

Sincerely,
Joanne
If it's right for you, then it's right, . . . . . for you!!!

Play - http://www.jobird.com
Pay for Play - http://www.jobird.com/refund.htm
Looking for Love? - http://www.jobird.com/hearts.htm Garden Kinder CDs
http://www.jobird.com/cd/gardenkinderhome.html
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