Recent research has shown that the average lifespans of domesticated animals are up to 4 years less than those of their feral counterparts. The findings of this research highlight the hypocrisy and selfishness of pet owners - that these so-called animal lovers brutally and callously cut short the lives of their four-legged companions.

Adequacy.org spoke to the scientist behind the research and asked, what can be done to rectify this widespread and socially acceptable form of barbarism?
The findings of this research, published in the June issue of the Journal of the American Association of Veterinary Science and Associated Professions, are an unequivocal condemnation of pet owners. The facts, presented below, make chilling reading. For example, the average lifespan of a domesticated dog is four years less than that of a similar dog living in the wild.
Species Domesticated Lifespan (years) Feral Lifespan (years) Cat 16 19
Dog 12 16
Fish 5 6
Hamster 2 2
Horse 25 29
Rabbit 10 12
Comparative Lifespans of Domesticated and Feral Animals

Dr. Victor O'Neill, the author of this work and a veterinary surgeon for over 25 years, explained that several factors are responsible for foreshortening the lives of domesticated animals.
"Firstly, animals reared in a domestic environment are not exposed to the same pathogens during infancy as wild animals. Therefore, the immune systems of domesticated animals do not develop properly, which leads to a reduced resistance to disease in adulthood."

"However, the main reason for these disturbing findings is that animals do not adapt to domestic life. Animals are simply unhappy when sharing a habitat with humans. Humans attempt to impose their value system upon animals and then punish the animals should they transgress this arbitrary set of rules of which they have no comprehension. These animals, enslaved by human tyrants, eventually lose the will to live, which results in their premature deaths."
Following the publication of his research, O'Neill has formed a pressure group to lobby for a change in the law, outlawing pet ownership. In the short term, O'Neill believes that a change in people's attitudes is necessary.
"Currently, pet ownership is seen as a harmless hobby and people are dependant on their companion animals. However, this research has shown that pet ownership is anything but harmless. People need to realise that it is a cruel institution that must be stopped."

"There are many parallels between pet ownership and the practice of slavery that was widespread in the United States of America during the early part of the last century. Nowadays, the ownership of slaves is socially unacceptable and is rightly acknowledged as a barbaric practice. Pet ownership is exactly the same. I hope that people will come to realise that keeping domesticated animals is morally indefensible and that society will ostracize pet owners."

However, O'Neill's viewpoint has been controversial and unpopular.

"I have recieved innumerable death threats from pet owners. On one occassion my eight year-old daughter was kidnapped and physically assaulted by an enraged pet owner. Animal lovers are notorious for their emotional instability and they rely on their pet animals as a substitute for normal human relationships. My proposals to remove their emotional safety net are anathema to them and it is hardly surprising to see such an irrational reaction."
It is truly inspiring to meet a man such as O'Neill who is willing to risk his personal safety in the fight for a righteous cause. It is indisputable that pet ownership is a vile practice. Humanity will only ever be able to consider itself an advanced civilisation when it outlaws this cruel institution and treats the lesser species with proper respect.
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The study makes no mention on how getting hit by a car significantly shortens the life span of these furry creatures.
Frank "I love animals, medium rare, with ketchup" from Deetroit
Recent research has shown that the average lifespans of domesticated animals are up to 4 years less than those of their feral counterparts.

I own 3 cats, a cockatoo and an African grey parrot.

I have read lots of books, and know lots of poet owners, so feel fairly qualified on the subject. I used to dream about Harry my cockatoo being able to fly free, as birds should, and the cats should surely be allowed to wonder about outside as they please?
Wrong. My birds are MUCH SAFER at home with me than they would be in the wild. The law of the jungle doesn't apply at home. The cat's don't have to worry about being chased by dogs are run over by a motorist. They don't have to worry about FIV or any other nasty cat disease, again they are much safer at home and hence will surely live longer.
Just for the record, all my pets are extremely relaxed and happy.

Gary.
This nothing but a bald-faced lie! It's a proven fact animals in zoos live far longer than their wild counterparts. Feral animals don't have access to medical care or steady food, so their life spans are naturally shorter. If the animal rights crowd has to stoop to lies to get their message out, they must be getting desperate.

Frederick J. Barnett http://www.eatel.net/~fred / "Someone's got to take the responsibility if the job's going to get done!! Do you think that's easy?!" Gregory Peck - The Guns Of Navarone
This nothing but a bald-faced lie! It's a proven fact animals in zoos live far longer than their wild counterparts. ... responsibility if the job's going to get done!! Do you think that's easy?!" Gregory Peck - The Guns Of Navarone

I have to agree. What is the cite for this study?
Also, animals that have been domesticated DO NOT have a "wonderful life" in the wild, no matter how long it is.
R Flowers
Recent research has shown that the average lifespans of domesticated animals are up to 4 years less than those of ... to consider itself an advanced civilisation when it outlaws this cruel institution and treats the lesser species with proper respect.

Tell all this drivel to my 2 "mutt" (read: non purebred) house cats. Came from a local farm litter about 5 years ago. They're the only 2 left alive out of the entire litter AND their parents. Yeah, living out in the wild is much better. Right. Uh-huh, got ya.
They seem to have adjusted to filtered drinking water, a regular diet and relatively stable climate just fine. Their siblings and parents are dead and were unavailable for comment...
The study makes no mention on how getting hit by a car significantly shortens the life span of these furry creatures.

What study? I see no mention of it here
http://avmajournals.avma.org/toc/javma/228/11;jsessionid=oCWVOq54d6rgQz9opV It might be the letter to the editor.. or it might be ***.
The study makes no mention on how getting hit by a car significantly shortens the life span of these furry creatures.

What study? I see no mention of it here http://avmajournals.avma.org/toc/javma/228/11;jsessionid=oCWVOq54d6rgQz9opV It might be the letter to the editor.. or it might be ***.

Checked the adequacy website, and found that along with (non fact checked) articles contributed by readers on the topic of proof of alien life on other planets (as proved in scripture), this article was in fact posted around 5 years ago- with no citations. A quick google showed no such Journal of the American Association of Veterinary Science and Associated Professions, and no references to Dr. Victor O'Neill that didn't ultimately lead back to this article as the source of his name.
This is nonsense. Last I heard, the average life span of feral domesticated cats was way below 10 years of age, nowhere near 19.

Whoever suggested the sockpuppet makes sense. Sounds like something he would say.
Tara
What study? I see no mention of it here http://avmajournals.avma.org/toc/javma/228/11;jsessionid=oCWVOq54d6rgQz9opV It might be the letter to the editor.. or it might be ***.

Checked the adequacy website, and found that along with (non fact checked) articles contributed by readers on the topic of ... I heard, the average life span of feral domesticated cats was way below 10 years of age, nowhere near 19.

It does seem a tad credulous to accept without proper citations that a pet
provided with a steady supply of food, medical care and protection from

predators would have a shorter life expectancy than a wild animal.
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