I just got a six month old pit-boxer mix who is rather bull-headed. He is super nice and super friendly, but he jumps on people, pulls on the leash, and pretty much ignores my commands! I'm pretty consistent with him, but he is a pain in the ***. Any suggestions?
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I just got a six month old pit-boxer mix who is rather bull-headed. He is super nice and super friendly, ... pretty much ignores my commands! I'm pretty consistent with him, but he is a pain in the ***. Any suggestions?

training.

Janet Boss
www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com
I just got a six month old pit-boxer mix who is rather bull-headed. He is super nice and super friendly, ... pretty much ignores my commands! I'm pretty consistent with him, but he is a pain in the ***. Any suggestions?

You need to teach him how to greet people, how to walk on lead, and what those commands mean. There's no such thing as a stubborn dog. All that really means is that the dog doesn't understand what's wanted, or hasn't been given sufficient motivation to do it.

Lynn K.
I understand the concepts, but he doesn't seem to pay attention to me: He avoids eye contact and wont respond if I call his name. The only time he acknowledges me is when he is tethered, or when he wants something. He loves flirting with everyone else though. He will stop and stare at people, and other animals, from across the street. Also, I have to nudge him to sit. This is rather disconcerting considering I he knows the sit command. I wonder if he is misses his former guardian and is experiencing some type of seperation anxiety. Could it possibly be a dominance issue?
I understand the concepts, but he doesn't seem to pay attention to me:

Then apparently you don't understand the concepts as well as you need to or he'd be paying attention to you.
time he acknowledges me is when he is tethered, or when he wants something. He loves flirting with everyone else ... is misses his former guardian and is experiencing some type of seperation anxiety. Could it possibly be a dominance issue?

No.
It's an OWNER issue.
It's almost always an OWNER issue.
Your dog sounds like any other dog who hasn't been properly OBEDIENCE TRAINED.
So my advice to you is to enroll your dog and yourself in a good OBEDIENCE TRAINING class, or find a good professional trainer who will show you the ropes, etc.
Your vet can usually help you find one and/or both.

Good luck!

Handsome Jack Morrison
I stand with Israel.
http://michellemalkin.com/archives/005547.htm
Two books that every American (and Canadian) should read:
1) The Rage and The Pride, by Orianna Fallacihttp://makeashorterlink.com/?J13521A6D
2) The Force of Reason, by Orianna Fallacihttp://makeashorterlink.com/?T42552A6D
While they still can.
A little history lesson about Israel:
http://israelmatzav.blogspot.com/2006/07/history-lesson.html
Wasn't trying to force eye contact; I agree that coercion is a bad idea. He might be frustrating, but he is still a sentient being. I think a trainer is probably a good idea. I just wanted some feedback first. He is super smart and I think he will get it. He is already doing better on the lead.
Thank you.
I understand the concepts, but he doesn't seem to pay attention to me:

You really could use some in person help here. I've found that understanding the concepts and putting them into practice, isn't something so simple for a lot of people and their dogs. A group class should suit your needs just fine.

Janet Boss
www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com
Wasn't trying to force eye contact; I agree that coercion is a bad idea. He might be frustrating, but he is still a sentient being. I think a trainer is probably a good idea. I just wanted some feedback first.

The best thing you can do, I think, is get enrolled in a class with him. Aside from obedience issues, it will do a world of good in terms of building a relationship between the two of you.
He is super smart and I think he will get it.

Of course he is, he's a bully! I'm a huge fan of both Pit Bulls and Boxers, so I'm a little biased, but they're damnfine dogs.

Shelly (Warning: see label for details)
http://www.cat-sidh.net (the Mother Ship)
http://esther.cat-sidh.net (Letters to Esther)
Wasn't trying to force eye contact; I agree that coercion is a bad idea. He might be frustrating, but he ... first. He is super smart and I think he will get it. He is already doing better on the lead.

I agree with the value of getting instruction from a trainer, either individually or in a class. I'd just like to throw in an idea I've found
useful in dealing with dogs that appear "independent." Jean Donaldson expressed it as, "control what the dog wants, control the dog." Or in other words, try to arrange it so that your dog doesn't get all of his gratification independent of you, but instead that you "harness" his gratification-seeking and use it as motivation. This is the essence of NILIF (nothing in life is free) programs. If the dog doesn't seem interested in what you have to offer, offer him something he *is* interested in.
The more you know about training, probably the better you'll be able to do this.
I can't remember if you said you take him for walks. IMO, with a lot of dogs, taking them on walks is a good "bonding" activity. They may not appear to appreciate your presence, as they pull on the lead, sniff the scents, and pay attention to everything but you but you are the facilitator and these pleasures only occur with and through you.

I'm glad to hear you are willing to follow through on behalf of this dog. I expect persistence will pay off.
Amy Dahl
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